Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch

Just last week, Landon and I discussed the risk Orson Welles and RKO took in making Citizen Kane, likening it to a major studio making a fictional movie based on Rupert Murdoch at the height of his power. According to Twitch, it won’t be made by a major studio, but an indie outlet is pushing forward with a direct biopic of the media mogul. Screen Australia is investing funds into developing a script called The News of the World, which will focus on Murdoch’s purchase of that same-titled newspaper in the 1960s as a way to tell his life story. Judging by his recent legal problems, it may not come with a Hollywood ending. The screenplay will come from Bob Ellis (Newsfront, Man of Flowers) – who hasn’t been active in filmmaking since the mid-1990s – alongside Stephen Ramsay. The acute danger of a project like this is that it will be far too blunt to matter. Not only is it directly taking on Murdoch’s story (as opposed to the roman á clef nature of Kane), but since it deals with a polarizing figure, it could end up being more attack job than earnest portrait. The movie won’t work narratively if every scene is in service of displaying Murdoch as a giant asshole. With any luck, Ellis and Ramsay will manage some grace and restraint in service of a human story. If it gets made, we’ll get to see if Fox News bans all mention of it or if Murdoch uses back channels to […]

read more...

Citizen Kane

Looking for any excuse, Landon Palmer and Cole Abaius are using the Sight & Sound poll results as a reason to take different angles on the greatest movies of all time. Every week, they’ll discuss another entry in the list, dissecting old favorites from odd angles, discovering movies they haven’t seen before and asking you to join in on the conversation. Of course it helps if you’ve seen the movie because there will be plenty of spoilers. This week, they discuss the fortitude it took to make Citizen Kane with a still-powerful William Randolph Hearst ready to respond with fire; they imagine a modern equivalent taking on a pre-scandal Rupert Murdoch; and they explore the irony inherent in the movie’s treatment of journalism.

read more...

From tabloid fodder to genuine privacy issue to movie, that’s how these things go. Variety is reporting that What’s It All About? Productions has optioned Harold Evans’s book “Good Times, Bad Times” which is a He Said account of a contentious relationship between Evans and media titan Rupert Murdoch while the former was the editor of the Sunday Times. There isn’t a script yet, but the phone tapping scandal was a massive news story that crossed over from 2011 to 2012, so it’s unsurprising that it will find its way in some form to the big screen. The catch here is that What’s It All About? isn’t exactly a major player. They’re a small shingle looking for a production partner, which means this project is miles away from being a done deal. The big question that will propel it forward: do people want to see the mud-slinging between two men who buy ink in bulk?  

read more...
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 11.21.2014
D
published: 11.21.2014
B+
published: 11.19.2014
C+
published: 11.19.2014
B-, C


Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3