Tilda Swinton

Tilda Swinton in Burn After Reading

2011 and 2012 were tough years. Before then, things were plentiful, as every year a new Coen Brothers film would release right on schedule. No Country for Old Men, Burn After Reading, A Serious Man and True Grit. Truly, it was a great time to be alive. But the next two years after True Grit were a desert. No Coen films. No Coen anything. Not a single trace of dryly broad (or broadly dry?) comic sensibilities, nor the gentle pop of John Goodman’s vocal chords exploding after one screamed line too many. Those were dark times. And when Inside Llewyn Davis swooped in to remind us that Joel and Ethan Coen were both still alive and still capable of putting story to celluloid, things got a little lighter. But still the question remained: when would the Coens return to hibernation? We should be in the clear for now. Their latest film has progressed enough to call it quits on the Coen slumber party. It’s got a title (Hail Caesar!), two cast members (George Clooney and Josh Brolin), and a vague outline of the story. It’ll follow Eddie Mannix, a Hollywood fixer in the moviemaking salad days of the 1950s. Mannix will have to juggle the lives and careers of various hyperactive Coen movie moguls. And now, according to Variety, the film’s got cast member number three: Channing Tatum.

read more...

Snowpiercer

For director Bong Joon-ho, the future looks bleak. Based on the French graphic novel, “Le Transperceneige,” Snowpiercer takes audiences a mere twenty-six years into the future when an attempt to stop global warming leaves the world frozen and uninhabitable. The only humans left alive now exist on a self-sustaining train that endlessly circles the earth making their new home feel more like prison than salvation. For those segregated to the back of the train, life is a constant struggle where every meal (and moment) is regulated by a select few lucky enough to have boarded at the front. The Snowpiercer is ruled by it’s omnipresent inventor, Wilford, and his unflinching rules are upheld by Mason (Tilda Swinton) who is equal parts comical and terrifying. Trying to survive under this constant oppression, it is not long before those in the back of the train decide it is time to overthrow their self-appointed rulers. This rag-tag army, as led by the surly Curtis (Chris Evans), band together to push their way to the front and try to figure out why they are being treated like second-class citizens.

read more...

Spring Break 83 Movie

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

read more...

Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston in ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE

Editor’s note: Our review of Only Lovers Left Alive originally ran during this year’s SXSW, but we’re re-posting it as the film opens theatrically. Director Jim Jarmusch‘s (Broken Flowers, Dead Man) films have never been for everyone. They’re experimental in a variety of ways, but, for good or bad, they are always Jim Jarmusch films. However, sometimes too much Jarmuschiness can agitate even his own fans. His last film, The Limits of Control, never shied away from testing its audience’s patience in part because its awareness of itself was far too often distancing. That’s not the case with his latest film, Only Lovers Left Alive, a movie that maintains its focus, emotional investment, and laughs from start to finish. Adam (Tom Hiddleston) and Eve (Tilda Swinton) have been lovers for hundreds of years. They’re true romantics, but they are on opposite sides of the world. Eve is living in Tangier, while Adam is in the rotting city of Detroit. Time is relative when you’re immortal, but still, it’s not easy for them. The distance becomes an issue when Adam, a shy goth rockstar, is feeling more lost than usual without her. She immediately packs her favorite novels, books a flight, and comes to Adam’s side. It should be mentioned that they’re also vampires, which explains why they’ve been alive for so long.

read more...

Only Lovers Left Alive

When a well-known actor takes a job for the cash, the final result generally comes off as little more than a paycheck for all involved. Actress Tilda Swinton is lucky, in that regard. Her work-for-hire performances have served the likes of David Fincher, Tony Gilroy, the Coen Brothers, and the perfectly fine adaptation of The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. Those pictures aren’t Swinton “selling out,” but taking on respectable gigs with people whose work she admires. What revs the actress up the most are the kind of projects that represent who she is. “That’s just the way I roll,” says Swinton on her long history of staying in the trenches with the projects and filmmakers that she deeply connects with. She’s someone that stands by her director. If you recall, when Bong Joon-Ho’s director’s cut of Snowpiercer was in danger of being chopped up for its US release, Swinton quickly came to the his aid, saying, “Maybe an effect of the film is that when one has spent two hours in the claustrophobia of this train we can leave the cinema and feel the relief that we can make life wider, so maybe it’s a sort of aversion therapy to sit in the train for two hours. That’s two hours, not one hour and forty minutes.” Clearly, Swinton is an actress you want by your side during all the trials and tribulations of filmmaking. She also went to bat for director Jim Jarmusch for this long-in-development Only Lovers Left Alive. She’s been attached to the project […]

read more...

The-Grand-Budapest-Hotel-Poster_header

Wes Anderson‘s latest foray into the world of forbidden love is a little more off-kilter than 2012’s sweet childhood romance Moonrise Kingdom. It’s not that Sam and Suzy’s budding union was all sunshine and butterflies; it’s just that The Grand Budapest Hotel‘s events are set off by a mustachioed Ralph Fiennes having relations with an 84 year-old Tilda Swinton. Fiennes plays a top-notch concierge named Gustave H., who takes on an apprentice and confidant to shadow him in all his endeavors. When Swinton’s wealthy heiress suddenly dies, all hell breaks loose as her gang of relatives come after him (“I go to bed with all my friends,” he purrs to her son Adrien Brody. Brave man.) as they realize she’s left some very valuable assets to him in her will. There’s also a small predicament that some believe that he may have murdered her as well. The film appears to be told through the eyes of Gustave’s apprentice, meaning we’re getting a look at a very ridiculous world of adults, even if he truly believes it to be serious and respectable. In true Andersonian fashion, the landscapes are lush, the hotel is ornate and the colors are vibrant; even if the situation is grim, it’s kind of a world you want to be immersed in. Favorite shot of an adult doing a silly task: Willem Defoe riding a motorbike with tiny goggles. Check out the trailer here:

read more...

oh0iz9

While it’s still unclear when the U.S. will be able to see Bong Joon-Ho‘s Snowpiercer, which is still enjoying a record-breaking run in South Korea, we can all wait and twiddle our thumbs while the Weinstein Company trims and re-edits the movie and occupy ourselves with these new stills and gorgeous concept art. Many of the photos take us inside the grimy train where people huddle in the dark – but Tilda Swinton almost looks stately in her bug glasses and fur coat. In sharp contrast to the train, Alison Pill appears to rule over a bright, cheery classroom as the grooviest schoolteacher in an otherwise desolate landscape. I’d like to think that shot of the man in the suit looking puzzled is a direct reaction to watching her dance. The concept art shows beautifully inked images of the train and its insides, and perhaps glimpses of scenes that we haven’t been shown yet. And hopefully, that won’t get cut in the “new and improved” version of the film that we may get thrust upon us. Hopefully, these images will be enough to tide you over for awhile, because it doesn’t look like we’ll be seeing Snowpiercer until early next year, so take a look after the break.

read more...

trailer snowpiercer

There are few directors with a track record as consistent as Bong Joon-ho, and while it could be argued that he hasn’t made all that many films yet I’ll always prefer quality over quantity. His debut feature remains his only truly average one with Memories of Murder, The Host and Mother all being near brilliant examples of genre filmmaking at its best. It’s been a long four-year wait since his last film, but Bong’s newest is finally ready to be shared with audiences. Snowpiercer is his biggest film yet with a globe-spanning storyline and an international cast. The story, based on a French graphic novel, is a post-apocalyptic tale about a train carrying the last human survivors across a landscape enduring a new ice age. A clear line exists between the classes, and as the train races along the tracks a violent uprising is brewing in the back cars. Take a ride with the Snowpiercer trailer below. (And note, this international trailer isn’t of the highest quality.)

read more...

snowpiercer-characterposters-swinton-full

While Bong Joon-ho‘s upcoming Snowpiercer is set in a post-apocalyptic world where the only living survivors of a massive, ongoing Ice Age all live together on a trans-continental train that continually circles the globe, it looks like certain things haven’t changed – namely, that Tilda Swinton has still somehow managed to look insane, otherworldly, and completely engrossed in her character. Sure, there are some shades of Golden Girls here in this first set of character posters for the film, but this look at Swinton and the rest of the cast is eerily compelling. Just how bad are things on this train? (Yes, yes, pretty bad, as there is a revolution stirring.) After the break, check out the rest of the character posters, including Chris Evans, Jamie Bell, John Hurt, Kang-ho Song, and Octavia Spencer.

read more...

Only Lovers Left Alive

Jim Jarmusch usually only makes a new movie once every few years these days, so it’s always nice to see something he’s done pop up on the upcoming releases calendar. His latest work, Only Lovers Left Alive, can’t help but give one pause though. Is Jim Jarmusch, the guy who always makes off the beaten path projects, really making a vampire movie at the height of this current, Twilight-inspired vampire craze? Yes, it’s true, Jarmusch is making a movie about a glamorous, vampire rock star and his eternal romance with a pale, blood sucking beauty—but there’s a twist that makes all of that instantly okay. As you can see from the film’s first released image [via Indiewire], Jarmusch has cast The Avengers’ Tom Hiddleston as his vampire rocker, and Middle-earth’s Tilda Swinton as his centuries-old lover. Maybe it goes without saying, but… They. Look. Awesome. That’s all it takes, just one image of these two wearing sunglasses at night, and suddenly one’s mind dizzies with the anticipation of watching them hanging all over each other and acting all sleazy together. What a couple of creeps. Factor in that Jarmusch has also cast Mia Wasikowska as Swinton’s crazy little sister, and this thing is likely to extend the tired vampire craze by another five years. But it’s going to be worth it.

read more...

Maggie Gyllenhaal

What is Casting Couch? It’s the casting news roundup that’s been out of work since casting agents seem to be treating the week between Christmas and New Years as one prolonged food coma. If there’s one thing that Jurassic Park taught us, it’s that nature finds a way. Well, casting finds a way too. In a week where there isn’t any news getting leaked to the trades, leave it to Albuquerque Business First to break a new scoop. The eagle eyes over at The Film Stage noticed that, in an article about how that Michael Fassbender-starring rock and roll comedy called Frank is coming to town to shoot, the local source managed to break the news that Maggie Gyllenhaal is coming to town with it. Her involvement in the film sees her joining a cast that includes not just Fassbender, but two of the young MVPs of 2012, Domhnall Gleeson and Scoot McNairy, as well. Which, you know, makes her one of the luckiest ladies in the world.

read more...

Snow Piercer artwork

Whether due to coincidence or collusion, 2013 is the year three of South Korea’s best film directors will premiere their English language debuts. Kim Jee-woon’s The Last Stand will hit screens first in January, while Park Chan-wook’s Stoker will follow suit a few months later. Both films look to exist firmly in their director’s respective wheelhouse leaving Bong Joon-ho‘s Snow Piercer as far more of an unknown entity. One of the biggest questions has now been answered though as The Weinstein Company has reportedly picked up distribution rights for the film in North America, the UK and a few other English-speaking regions. No official release date has been set, but Deadline seems to believe a Summer 2013 premiere is to be expected. Snow Piercer is based on a French graphic novel called Transperceneige and plays out almost exclusively aboard a futuristic locomotive. The world has become an iced-over post-apocalyptic wasteland, and the only real safety is on this train which is constantly in motion. The last vestiges of humanity live aboard distinctly divided along class lines, but rumors of a rebellion from the lower decks reach the one-percenters living above and threaten to derail mankind’s last hope.

read more...

Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward in Moonrise Kingdom

It’s the summer of 1965, and a storm is heading towards New Penzance Island. The small dot of land is home to a few permanent residences, but it’s also a seasonal destination for a troop of Khaki Scouts who camp amidst the lush green forests and golden fields. Scout Master Ward (Edward Norton) awakes one morning to discover the troop’s least liked member, Sam (Jared Gilman), has gone missing. Elsewhere on the island the Bishop family realizes their daughter Suzy (Kara Hayward) has also disappeared. The two pre-teens fell for each other the year prior during a brief, chance meeting, and have now taken off on an adventure as young lovers are prone to do (in movies at least). Sam and Suzy soon have half the island searching for them, but being such a small, sparsely populated place that search party consists almost entirely of the Scout Master, the local constable, Captain Sharp (Bruce Willis) and Suzy’s parents, Walt and Laura (Bill Murray, Frances McDormand). Wes Anderson‘s latest film splits its time between the kids on the run and their mostly adult pursuers, and in doing so it tells two sides of a story that offer equal amounts of humor, whimsy and heartbreak. It’s a return to form for the director and his first to follow-up on the promise of Rushmore and The Royal Tenenbaums as it highlights the wide-eyed possibilities of youth and the harsh reality of adulthood.

read more...

Moonrise Kingdom appears to be a delicate fancy of a film – an assessment you suspect might entertain Wes Anderson – offering no more ground-breaking a story than young love, with the director’s traditional preoccupation with whimsy, and creating such artfully created landscapes and characters that they flirt outrageously with magic realism, though without explicit realisation of that concept. But there are weightier issues at hand, of parental neglect, of revolution (not just sexual but also anti-establishment), and it seems completely appropriate that Anderson chose to set it in as provocatively important a time as 1965. The film follows two young lovers – Sam (Jared Gilman) and Suzy (Kara Hayward) – who escape their lives to run away together, and the ensuing chaos of their parents and the local authorities’ attempts to find them: no more than a gentle plot that suggests nothing of the drama and comedy that subsequently unfolds.

read more...

Hooray! On May 25th, Wes Anderson‘s latest movie Moonrise Kingdom will enjoy the warm glow of the silver screen. The movie stars Bruce Willis, Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, Tilda Swinton, Jason Schwartzman and Bob Balaban, and it tells the story of young love that leaves town and causes a search party to form. No doubt, Balaban is looking stately here. Like a young Santa Claus. Ahead of the release, Focus Features has released a team photo of the whole crew, and if you didn’t know it was from Wes Anderson before, this photo definitely isn’t hiding it. Check it out for yourself and click it to make it even bigger:

read more...

South Korean filmmaker Bong Joon-ho‘s English-language debut was always going to be a hotly anticipated feature, but as the cast for Snow Piercer rounds out, it’s become obvious that The Host director is really going all out for this one. The next star to join the sci-fi indie film is Octavia Spencer, who just won a SAG Award for Best Supporting Actress and is viewed as the frontrunner for the Oscar in the same category for her work in The Help. She joins an already impressive (both in terms of talent and how wonderfully varied it is) cast that includes Chris Evans, The Host star Kang Ho Song, and veteran talents John Hurt and Tilda Swinton. The film, which has been adapted from the French graphic novel Le Transperceneige has been co-scripted by Bong (with the most recent draft coming from Kelly Masterson), and is set in a future world ruined by a failed attempt to finally stop the fallout from global warming. The experiment to end global warming has led to an Ice Age that has destroyed all living creatures, except for those who live on the Snow Piercer, ” a train that travels around the globe and is powered by a sacred perpetual-motion engine.” The film will center on a revolution that stirs up between the train’s inhabitants, who had previously settled into an uneasy class system. Spencer’s role will be that as a mother who takes up with the revolution ” in order to save her son” […]

read more...

Reel Sex

People were up in arms Tuesday after the announcement of nominees for the 84th Annual Academy Awards. So many seem to forget that every year they are disappointed with the nominees and every year there is some film or performer who was left off or included on the prestigious list. I may have spent the final weeks of 2011 lamenting my utter ennui with last year’s films, but I never in a million years expected some of the Oscar outcomes. No Supporting Actor nomination for Albert Brooks, whose performance in Drive unnerved audiences to the core? Or the blatant disregard for solid documentary filmmaking in The Interrupters, Buck, or Project Nim, three entries into filmmaking that will forever impact the way we view the world around us? No, the Academy seemed to forget the impressive and daring offerings in favor of an adorable dog in a silent film. What is this, 1920? Last I checked The Jazz Singer pushed us into the land of the talkies. I could spend all day gnawing my tongue over which films shouldn’t have been included in this year’s awards recognition, but just like arguing the virtues and evils of the MPAA, our time is better used talking about some of the sexy pieces of work that the Academy felt were too provocative to include (for reasons I have completely made up in my mind. Hey, they have their prerogative, I have mine.). Going along with the Academy’s new voodoo math rules of deciding the […]

read more...

Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg

What is Movie News After Dark? It’s a nightly dose of awesome movie news, with a side of other stuff you’ll probably want to read in between all the movie news. We begin tonight with an image of Edgar Wright and Simon Pegg pondering The World’s End, the supposed third film in their “Three Flavors Cornetto Trilogy” that began with Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz. It’s about damned time, as they say. From Scott Pilgrim to Star Trek, the pair have done plenty of great things apart, but now we’ll hopefully see them wrap this thing up. Unless Marvel calls Edgar about that Ant-Man movie…

read more...

Tilda Swinton and John Hurt

South Korean director Joon-ho Bong is set to make his English language directorial debut with a train thriller set in an ice covered world called Snow Piercer. Normally if you told me there was a movie about train travel on an ice covered world called Snow Piercer, I would assume that we were talking about a Syfy channel original with a B-list cast and some hilarious attempts at digital effects; but that’s certainly not the case here. Joon-ho is pretty much the man when it comes to moviemaking skills, so despite its outlandish premise, Snow Piercer is very rapidly amassing an impressive cast. I mean, duh, Hollywood actors have probably been lining up around the block to audition once it was announced they could work with this guy.

read more...

Culture Warrior

Ambiguity is no stranger to the arthouse film. Over fifty years after a group of daytrippers never found their lost shipmate in Antonioni’s L’Avventura, the ambiguous ending still retains the power to frustrate, confuse, anger, and challenge viewers. Continued controversies over ambiguity in narrative films point to Hollywood’s enduring dominance over the notion that films must be coherent and contain closure. However, the convention of closure can be a maddening limitation for filmmakers who intend to ask questions with no easy answers, or pose problems with no clear solutions (assuming that such answers or solutions exist in the first place). But ambiguity can take on a variety of forms, and with different degrees of effectiveness. Sometimes a film’s ambiguous hole can be more fulfilling and thought-provoking than any convention of linear causality in its place, but at other points ambiguity can become a handicap, or a gap that simply feels like a gap. Here are a few films from the past year that engage in several modes of intended ambiguity.

read more...
NEXT PAGE  
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 12.19.2014
A-
published: 12.18.2014
C-
published: 12.17.2014
B+


Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3