Aptly Titled, ‘A Very Short Film’ is a Very Vibrant Experiment

Short of the Day

A colorful and whimsical 95-second dream-journey.

I don’t know exactly what’s going on in A Very Short Film, but I know I was rapt, almost hypnotized by it. It comes from Vallée Duhamel – a studio founded by Julian Vallée and Eve Duhamel – and consists of artificial backgrounds depicting a strange environment colored like a birthday cake and a young woman in a pretty yellow dress navigating her way through it. The film has no dialogue, no real plot other than progression, and an aesthetic that looks like Wes Anderson and Jacques Tati collaborated on an unused Fellini script, along with all the beautiful and abstract brilliance such an amalgam would infer.

Telling a story with words and linear structure is all well and good, but it takes a particular kind of talent to tell a story without either of these things, to engage the experiential side of our minds as opposed to the rational side, and Vallée and Duhamel are two such talents. A Very Short Film is a very big delight, a delectable, bite-sized dessert for the eyes and just the spark of quirk you need to push your spirits through to the weekend.