Louis C.K.’s self-financed film might be a casualty of a recent exposè.

A big premiere for Louis C.K.’s newest film, I Love You, Daddy, was supposed to happen this evening in New York. That plan was scrapped at the last second due to a new exposè that was written by the NY Times detailing multiple instances of sexual misconduct by Louis C.K. According to Deadline, the comedian was also scheduled to appear on tonight’s Late Show with Stephen Colbert, but that has been canceled as well.

The Orchard, who is handling the release of the film, said in a statement, “In light of the allegations concerning Louis C.K. referenced in today’s New York Times, we are canceling tonight’s premiere of I Love You, Daddy. There is never a place for the behavior detailed in these allegations. As a result, we are giving careful consideration to the timing and release of the film and continuing to review the situation.” I Love You, Daddy is still scheduled for release on November 17th for the time being.

The Orchard acquired the picture shortly after its premiere at the Toronto Film Festival in September. It was quite a large purchase of $5 million considering the film’s subject material. It was likely a gamble from The Orchard based on the popularity of C.K. and the strength of the supporting cast which includes John Malkovich, Chloe Grace Moretz, Rose Byrne, Edie Falco, Charlie Day, Pamela Adlon, Helen Hunt and Ebonee Noel. Outside of the new allegations against C.K., the picture was always going to be a headache for The Orchard given the current news cycle. I Love You, Daddy features C.K. plays Glen Topher who is well-0ff due to his work in entertainment. Trouble happens when his daughter China (Moretz) gets involved with an older man/director (Malkovich) known for his creepy relationships.

There are some rumors that The Orchard might not even release the film given the claims against C.K. While they might delay the release or outright give up the rights to the project remains to be seen, but it is likely that the film will see the light of day. Louis C.K. was able to keep the project secret up until its release at the Toronto Film Festival because he finances most of the film himself. It is likely that should The Orchard give up on showing the film, the rights might return to C.K. and he could distribute it himself. How many people would want to see it after the recent allegations? Well, that’s for audiences to determine.

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