Media companies jump ship after C.K. admits to sexual misconduct.

It’s been a whirlwind 48-hours for comedy icon Louis C.K. Yesterday, the premier for C.K.’s latest film, I Love You, Daddy! was scrapped after a New York Times’ exposé accused the star of sexual misconduct towards five women. C.K. also canceled his public appearance for later that evening when he was scheduled to appear on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert.

Earlier today, indie film distributor, The Orchard, announced that they would cancel I Love You, Daddy!’s theatrical release. The film was set for a November 17th launch. The dark comedy which C.K. co-wrote, stars in and directed also features a murderer’s row of Hollywood stars. The cast includes John Malkovich, Chloë Grace Moretz, Rose Byrne, Edie Falco, Charlie Day, Pamela Adlon, Helen Hunt and Ebonee Noel. The film is said to feature an uncomfortable scene with an uncanny relation to the allegations leveled against C.K.

Also on Friday, Deadline reported that FX Networks and FX Production have ended their association with the comedy mogul. They issued the following statement:

Today, FX Networks and FX Productions are ending our association with Louis C.K. We are cancelling the overall deal between FX Productions and his production company, Pig Newton. He will no longer serve as executive producer or receive compensation on any of the four shows we were producing with him – Better Things, Baskets, One Mississippi and The Cops.

C.K.’s FX series Louie is heralded as one of the most original comedies on television. The show began in 2010 and has aired 61 episodes over five seasons.

The bad news didn’t stop pouring in for C.K. Also on Friday, HBO dropped C.K. from its A Night of Too Many Stars special, Netflix announced it would not go ahead with their planned stand-up comedy special, and TBS suspended production on C.K.’s upcoming animated series, The Cops.

Additionally, 3 Arts Management and Kovert Creative have also parted ways with C.K., leaving him without his management company and publicists.

Usually, when scandals strike, celebrities are whisked off to rehab centers or other facilities where they can seek treatment and keep a low profile. Depending on the severity of the offense, they may emerge years later and try and pick up the pieces of their shattered career. There are a couple noteworthy components to today’s story: One, the scandal is taking place amidst a widespread sexual misconduct reckoning where a mogul like C.K. is not even the biggest story in the news; two, he’s not denying it.

Today, C.K. issued a statement in the New York Times admitting there is truth to the women’s claims. Here is a brief excerpt:

I have been remorseful of my actions. And I’ve tried to learn from them. And run from them. Now I’m aware of the extent of the impact of my actions. I learned yesterday the extent to which I left these women who admired me feeling badly about themselves and cautious around other men who would never have put them in that position

The silver lining in today’s announcements is that the series C.K. produces will remain in production with C.K. being stripped of his producer role and potential compensation. Shows like Better Things and Baskets employ hundreds of men and women and it would be unfortunate to see them all lose their jobs because of their producer’s misconduct.

 

More to Read: