Youtube

username666 short film

Last week I introduced you to some of my favorite creepy short films on YouTube, perfect for your Halloween party YouTube playlist. (Does anyone do that? If not, you should, because that sounds awesome.) Those films were live action horrors. This week, I bring you the animated fare. Since animation is limited only by the bounds of the artist’s imagination, I find it tends to be creepier and far more surreal. If you disagree, please swear profusely at me in the comments! Also, feel free to share some your favorites. Here we go:

read more...

Devil

The dream is to get famous on YouTube and translate that success into a feature film career, but so far the only group to truly do that is Radio Silence. The filmmakers behind the found footage uterine horror Devil’s Due made a name for themselves on the site where a bajillion hours of video is uploaded every second, and now they’re staking that reputation on the big screen. We’ll talk to them about that jump and what goes into making a baby. Plus, Geoff and I attempt to sell each other on two debatable ideas: the rising power of fan clubs to demand content from creators and the need for aspiring screenwriters to avoid reading scripts-in-progress. You should follow the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis. And, as always, if you like the show (or hate it with seething fervor), please help us out with a review. Download Episode #46 Directly Or subscribe Through iTunes

read more...

Targets Karloff

The morning’s best writing from around the movie website-o-sphere. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

read more...

MINIS + MOVIES

YouTube has transformed itself into what was once the harbinger of Rick Astley videos and dudes filming what would happen when they bet they could totally jump off that roof into something somewhat more respectable. Via Sonar Entertainment, Youtube launched MINIS + MOVIES, a new paid subscription channel that brings classic miniseries and made-for-TV movies to your computer screen.

read more...

Culture Warrior on 2012

In this end-of-year editorial, Landon Palmer discusses the pattern that movies demonstrated in 2012 for telling stories through protagonists defined by their various personality traits rather than through conventional, straightforward characters. In so doing, movies this year showed how our individual identities have become divided within various aspects of modern social life. This trend made some of the year’s movies incredibly interesting, while others suffered from a personality disorder. Landon argues that movies ranging from The Hunger Games to The Dark Knight Rises to Holy Motors alongside cultural events and institutions like the Presidential election, social media, and “Gangnam Style” all contributed to a year in which popular culture is finally became open about its constant engagement with multiple cults of personality. Six years ago, Time magazine famously named its eagerly anticipated “Person of the Year” You in big, bold letters. Its cover even featured a mirror. As a result of the established popularity of supposedly democratized media outlets like Facebook and the home of the cover’s proverbial “You,” YouTube, Time declared 2006 as the year in which the masses were equipped with the ability to empower themselves for public expressions of individual identity. More than a half decade later, social media is no longer something new to adjust to, but a norm of living with access to technology. Supposing that Time’s prophecy proved largely correct, what does it mean to live in a 21st century where we each have perpetual access to refracting our respective mirrors?

read more...

The Quatermass Xperiment

Clicking aimlessly through the internet trying to figure out where you can see The Pirates of Blood River or The Satanic Rites of Dracula? Of course you are. What else would you be doing? Fortunately for all of us, an answer has been found in the form of a Hammer Films YouTube channel. The studio responsible for strapping vampire teeth to Christopher Lee in the 70s has had a vibrant resurgence, reforming after a three-decade break to produce films like Let Me In and The Woman In Black. Their success has opened the door for more horror and sci-fi, but it’s also encouraging to see them focus on some of their earlier cult hits. According to their press release, they’re making restored versions of The Quatermass Xperiment (1955), Man in Black (1949) and Captain Kronos – Vampire Hunter (1974) available with designs on more in the future. They have a massive catalogue to choose from, so hopefully we’ll see their very best publicly available on the video sharing site. In addition to the older gems, they’ll be using the channel to promote upcoming projects like The Quiet Ones – a story about a physics professor getting a team together to make a poltergeist. The channel will act both as a home for streaming movies and for advertising material like trailers and interviews. It’ll probably act as a hypnotizing agent for some sort of diabolical plan to make a planet full of B-movie zombies. Can’t wait!

read more...

Lloyd Kaufman is the Rodney Dangerfield of low-budget, B-level horror movies. He gets no respect. Even Roger Corman, who is notorious for cranking out genre films for profit since the 1950s, has respect of his Hollywood peers. But in Corman’s shadow is Kaufman’s exploitation studio Troma, which has been generating marginal and low-quality entertainment for years…almost 40 years, to be exact. Troma began in 1974 as a joint venture between Kaufman and his buddy from Yale, Michael Hertz. Over the years, the studio has pulled their own fair share of Cormans by featuring would-be stars in their earliest roles, including Kevin Costner in Sizzle Beach U.S.A., Billy Bob Thornton in Chopper Chicks in Zombietown, and the comedy team of Trey Parker and Matt Stone with Cannibal: The Musical. In 1985, Troma broke out with their tongue-in-cheek success The Toxic Avenger, a low-budget hit that spawned three sequels and gave Troma its poster boy for its studio. Soon, Troma became a staple in the direct-to-video market with additional hits like Class of Nuke‘Em High, Sgt. Kabukiman NYPD, A Nymphoid Barbarian in Dinosaur Hell, and Surf Nazis Must Die! To celebrate its upcoming 40th Anniversary in Tromaville, Troma is offering dozens of their movies for free on the Troma YouTube Channel. Films will be continually added to the line-up, but the channel is opening with the following titles:

read more...

The Best Short Films

Why Watch? Yesterday, we wrote about the theory that sites like YouTube and Vimeo would make festivals obsolete for independent filmmakers looking for an audience. In the age of the internet, they can directly connect. It’s no surprise that Freddie Wong‘s work has connected, because he makes accessible, unbelievably good CGI-driven, geek-friendly films. Video Game High School is his latest work – a project that was funded on KickStarter to the tune of over $270,000. All they were asking for, was $75k. That’s what internet popularity can get you. Fortunately, the work doesn’t disappoint. Granted, it’s not exactly a short film, but they’re releasing it in installments online so definitions are hard to come by here. It’s a feature length film, being told as a serial. Regardless of what Webster’s will do, this film is the future in more ways than one. What will it cost? Only 12 minutes. Skip Work. You’ve Got Time For More Short Films

read more...

Video Game High School

The absolute, must-read article of the week is “Disrupted: Indie Filmmakers” from Brian Newman at Sub-Genre . The week isn’t over yet, but the article that shows how popularity on YouTube has sidestepped the traditional indie film festival track will be tough to beat. It may sound a bit counter-intuitive because videos that get millions of views on YouTube are How To Videos and shots of cats wearing monocles and stuff, but there are a handful of popular users that are translating a massive subscriber list (and an even bigger amount of views) into funding through KickStarter (the above image comes from Video Game High School) and IndieGoGo to raise funds for more projects. Meanwhile, filmmakers trying to find funding are still going through festivals like Sundance and, often, falling short. It’s a fascinating theory because it seems plausible. It might not make immediate sense that making mash-ups and quirky spoofs could lead to big screen bliss, but all the elements are there.

read more...

The so-called YouTube generation, aka the ‘Me’ generation, doesn’t get a lot of respect. To be sure, that’s 100% their own doing thanks to their decision to live in an egotistical video bubble. Technology has reached a point where anyone and everyone can get themselves onscreen regardless of talent or worth, and society does the rest. The American public eats up all manner of reality television in multiple forms from actual TV shows to nut-shot video clips to online porn sites to cell phone captures of self-important nonsense. It’s those last two mediums, the internet porn and cell phone video, that meet in the new film King Kelly to tell a story about one specific member of this vapid, selfish and ultimately lost section of the population. We follow Kelly through a one day period in July and witness nothing short of the decline of Western civilization. Well, maybe it’s a little short of that, but we do watch as Kelly finds herself caught up in a search for stolen drugs, threats against her life and the arrival of her number one (and highly unstable) fan. She quickly and consistently proves herself to be exactly the kind of brat to star in her own TV show on the E! Network. The film is shot almost entirely on iPhones, and you’d be forgiven for thinking that sounds like an immediate recipe for disaster. An obnoxious young woman who rarely shuts up as the lead in a film comprised exclusively of cell […]

read more...

A deal was announced today that Walt Disney Pictures will start allowing hundreds of their films to be rented on YouTube, the Google-owned video hosting site that has also been pushing itself as a place to rent mainstream video titles since May of this year. Disney’s deal makes it the fourth big studio, joining Sony, Universal, and Warner Bros., to allow easy access to their movies not just on the YouTube.com site, but also on Android powered devices and on Google TV. Some Disney titles have already started hitting the site, with older movies like Alice in Wonderland available for a $1.99 rental, and newer titles like Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides available for $4.99. In addition to pushing movie rentals on their site, YouTube has also been active in developing branded channels where big time media companies can distribute video for free. This new Disney rentals deal was proceeded earlier this month by an announcement that the two companies were launching a co-branded YouTube channel for Disney’s original series. According to Reuters, this new channel will include, “video drawn from relevant family-friendly content currently available across YouTube, original video produced by Disney, as well as a blend of current Disney Interactive original series, select Disney Channel programming and Disney user created content.”

read more...

Want to feel insignificant? Stop reading this review and take a second to contemplate 6.8 billion. It’s an extraordinarily vast, staggering sum, almost unfathomable. And yet, throughout the world, every day, 6.8 billion people laugh and cry, love and fight, experiencing the joys and heartbreaks that are fundamental to life, as their own stories are written. Last summer, YouTube put out a global call for user-generated submissions of home movies depicting life on July 24, 2010. Life in a Day, the resulting film (assembled by director Kevin MacDonald, with an assist from producer Ridley Scott), culled into an hour-and-a-half from 90,000 entrants, is an extended montage of select clips drawn from the submissions.

read more...

Well over a billion opinion-owners have commented about the power and innovation of YouTube, but while watching videos of cats in sinks, it somehow feels like it’s not living up to its potential. Now it might be on the right track. Director Kevin MacDonald and Producer Ridley Scott will be showing their latest film Life in a Day on YouTube at the same time that it debuts at Sundance. The film especially belongs on Youtube, though. It’s a film created by exhaustively combing through over 4,500 submissions of daily life shot by people all over the world on July 24th, 2010. The crowd-sourcing technique was done a bit earlier with the Beastie Boys’ Awesome; I Fuckin’ Shot That (a title which screamed out its method), but the subject matter here lends itself completely to a deeper documentary film. From all the people that sent in tapes, 26 were chosen from a startling variety of countries, and the film will air for free on its official YouTube page; once on January 27th at 8pm EST and once again on January 28th at 7pm Local Time. Check out one the teaser clips for yourself:

read more...

cw-foundfootagefilmmaking

This week’s Culture Warrior talks fake movies that look real but are fake, from Paranormal Activity to Blair Witch to old people getting in it with garbage.

read more...

youtube-logo

From the people that brought you Sneezing Panda, it’s a movie rental concept that will rival Netflix, Redbox, and that guy that comes over sometimes and acts out all the parts to Sleepless in Seattle for you despite the restraining order.

read more...

Officially Cool

I found this nifty little video that makes Fight Club look like it could actually look like a lighthearted romantic comedy. Watch and comment, like Jack’s dirty mouth.

read more...

Officially Cool

Using the character creation feature on the smash hit video-game Soul Calibur 4, one YouTuber has created Presidential hopefuls Barack Obama, John McCain and Senator Hillary Clinton.

read more...

Officially Cool

Some people say that humans that are animated should be merely caricatures of humans, not mirror replicas. This is a video explaining the visual effects company, Image Metrics. Watch, and I will catch you after the video…

read more...

Officially Cool

I ran into this report of an Annual Ninja Parade that takes place in Modesto, California. Apparently thousands of people gather every year to “not see the ninjas”.

read more...

Officially Cool

Are you the type of person who loves to share movie quotes and one-liners with friends. Who doesn’t love the funny or iconic dialog from their favorite films. Well I found something sure to brighten up your day.

read more...
NEXT PAGE  
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 12.23.2014
B+
published: 12.22.2014
C-
published: 12.19.2014
A-


Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3