Winnie the Pooh

molly weasley in action

Moms have been an important part of cinema since the beginning, as one of the first humans to appear in a film was Sarah Whitley, mother-in-law of inventor/director Louis Le Prince, in the extremely short 1888 work Roundhay Garden Scene. Since then, we’ve had mothers serving important roles in quintessential masterpieces of Soviet cinema (Mother), Bollywood (Mother India), experimental film (Window Water Baby Moving), animated features (Bambi, Dumbo, etc.), documentary (Grey Gardens), political thriller (The Manchurian Candidate), science fiction (The Terminator), horror (Psycho, Friday the 13th, Carrie, etc.), comedy (The Graduate) and of course melodrama (the whole maternal subgenre). And we’ve all grown up identifying with certain movie moms, and actresses who often played moms; for me they were usually portrayed by Teri Garr, Melinda Dillon, Dee Wallace Stone and Diane Wiest. Therefore it would be an enormous task and read if I were to attempt to either list all or narrow down the best movie moms ever let alone handpick only a handful of scenes we love involving matriarchs. So I’ve asked the other FSR writers to help out by selecting a single maternal character they favor, and with one from yours truly included we honor ten of these varied women below.

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Year in Review: The Best Scores and Soundtracks of 2011

It has been quite the year in film, but even more so when it came to the music in those films. We got scores that pushed the envelope, soundtracks that were full of nostalgia and orchestration that could easily fit in to the 1930s. It was an eclectic year that introduced us to new talent while also reestablishing the music from existing ones. Normally when the year comes to close, I look back on the various soundtracks and scores from the films that came out and I can easily hone in on a handful that most stood out to me. 2011 was not that kind of year. With even more artists becoming composers (The Chemical Brothers and Basement Jaxx), impressive composers coming to the forefront (Cliff Martinez with his scores for The Lincoln Lawyer, Contagion and Drive, two of which made this list) and childhood favorites back on the big screen (The Muppets and Winnie the Pooh), there was a huge pool of talent and good music to choose from. And although it makes my task of rounding up the top picks more difficult, it also means films are getting filled with more and more good music – a trend I hope (and expect) will continue in 2012. But on to this year’s picks!

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The Holiday Gift Guide: DVD and Blu-ray

Merry Christmas movie/TV/goat-cheese lovers! As part of our week-long gift guide extravaganza thingamajig we’ve put together a list of Blu-rays, DVD and a few other ideas for you to use when shopping for others or for putting on your own Christmas list. Or both. Some of the films below are from years past, but they all hit Blu-ray and/or DVD this year so they totally count for this gift guide. Click on the links to be magically transported to Amazon, AmazonUK and other places where lovely things can be found.

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Whereas Pixar has dominated the category in recent years, the sense that Cars 2 isn’t a shoe-in for awards season is offering a spotlight to a wider field. In fact, it’s also a wider field that will beget more nominees – if there are 16 eligible in the given year, 5 nominees will make the short list. If the numbers stay steady, this would mark the third time since the Best Animated Feature‘s inception in 2001 that there are more than 3 films up for the big prize. According to The Wrap, the list of films that have been submitted for consideration include: The Adventures of Tintin, Alois Nebel, Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked, Arthur Christmas, Cars 2, A Cat in Paris, Chico & Rita, Gnomeo & Juliet, Happy Feet Two, Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil, Kung Fu Panda 2, Mars Needs Moms, Puss in Boots, Rango, Rio, The Smurfs, Winnie the Pooh, and Wrinkles. Just because they’ve been submitted doesn’t meant they’re all eligible. Several haven’t done qualifying runs in Los Angeles theaters, and many are questionable because of their use of motion capture or live-action blend. In the mo-cap cases of Tintin, Happy Feet Two and Mars Needs Moms, filmmakers have been asked to discuss their methods and intentions with the process in order to prove eligible. The Smurfs and Alvin and the Chipmunks are also animation/live-action hybrids, so their fate is unclear at this time. Without them, and without, say, the Czech Republic’s rotoscoped Alois Nebel, the […]

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This Week in Blu-ray

This is the best week of Blu-ray releases of 2011. Mark my words. No seriously, write it into your calendars. Between the breakout geek genre hit of the year, a Blu-ray set 65 million years in the making, a hero we can all believe in, creepy Finnish Santas, some Criterion confusion and Serbians doing terrible, terrible things to each other, this may be the most well-rounded, exciting week of releases we’ve seen in a long time. And it all begins with a must-have Pick of the Week… Attack the Block When Joe Cornish and Edgar Wright got together and decided to make a film about a group of hoodlums who face down an alien invasion, they probably didn’t think of you or me once. They didn’t know that they’d be custom-tailoring a sci-fi comedy for the nerd set that would ignite crowds and become the cult hit of this (and probably a few other years). They couldn’t have known. But they moved forward anyway, with a cast of unknowns and some killer creature designs, creating what could go down as the geek film of 2011. What’s more impressive about this release? Even though I didn’t receive a review copy, I’m making it pick of the week. Usually I’m a big whiney baby, who gets a bunch of review material, only to pick it apart week to week. But this week I’m putting my own money where my mouth is. In a week when competition comes from one of the longest awaited Blu […]

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What is Movie News After Dark? It’s nothing more than a nightly film news column that keeps fighting the good fight. The one that celebrates movies, good, bad and otherwise interesting, and is generally optimistic. It doesn’t attack other websites that smear its name. Though if /Film’s Page 2 keeps mean-mugging it, that bitch is gonna get smacked. That’s how we settle things in the streets. As you are about to see, this week’s final News After Dark edition comes on a very slow news night. So it’s all posters, future Blu-rays and articles I found interesting. Including this AV Club Q&A about first R-rated movies. Like AV’s Josh Modell, I’m fairly certain — almost completely certain — that my first R-rated film was The Blues Brothers, a film that has remained part of my beating, movie-loving heart ever since. What was your first R-rated movie? Feel free to let me know in the comment area below and we’ll have some fun discussing. Or not, whatever. I see how it is.

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What is Movie News After Dark? It’s a nightly movie news column that just got back from a little vacation. No, it didn’t go to Comic-Con in San Diego. It feels it necessary to leave stuff like that to the professionals, namely Misters Abaius, Fure and Giroux. They did a wonderful job, did they not? And rumor is that they’re not done yet. That said, it shouldn’t come to you as a surprise if tonight’s entry is a little Con-tilted, or nerd-obsessed. It is part of the Comic-Con hangover treatment, after all. The above image, tweeted out by Community creator Dan Harmon, shows a sign erected at the studio where the show has begun shooting its third season celebrating the show’s zero Emmy nominations. “I want to win an Emmy for this show,” said Harmon as he and cast led a rousing panel during Comic-Con. They’ll get one. If not, we’ll make one and send it to them.

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The Reject Report

So now Harry Potter’s patronus is in the shape of a giant dump truck loaded with million dollar bills. Is there such a thing as a million dollar bill? There probably should be. And while you’re at it, go ahead and put Alan Rickman’s face on it. In J.K. Rowling we trust. Okay, I’m done with all that. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows 2, the last film of the 10-year series, has demolished all kinds of box office records. After breaking advance day records with $32m in tickets sales, it went on to make $43.5m in midnight showings. It wasn’t a shock to anyone when the Friday numbers came in and Deathly Hallows 2 had beaten The Twilight Saga: New Moon‘s $72.7m opening day with its own $92.1m. But the young wizard wasn’t done there. No, satisfaction was not met at the defeat of New Moon, though we’re all pretty thankful for it. Deathly Hallows 2, and probably Warners had something to do with it, too, had its eyes set on that opening weekend. Another Warners film, The Dark Knight, was holding the #1 weekend slot for three years with its $158.4m three-day take. Now that Sunday’s numbers have come out, Deathly Hallows 2 has pretty much swept the floor with that record, too.

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This week, Fat Guy Kevin Carr dances with joy because it’s the only time you can dress up in flowing robes and head to the cineplex to see a movie based on an alleged children’s book and not get arrested. After cinching his wizarding cloak around his waist with his Gryffindor scarf, he sails off to check out Winnie the Pooh. Then, from the dysfunctional head cases in the Hundred Acre Wood, Kevin sneaks into the screening room next door to watch Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II only to discover he doesn’t have his 3D glasses. Curses!

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A.A. Milne’s Hundred Acre Wood and the characters that inhabit it are among the most indelible literary creations, so it’d have been pretty hard for directors Stephen J. Anderson and John Hall to mess things up in their new Winnie the Pooh. And they haven’t. With its appealingly retro hand drawn animation, low-key aura and narrative reliant on gentle misunderstandings, the film offers a welcome return vehicle for Pooh, Christopher Robin and their motley band of Hundred Acre dwellers.

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The Reject Report

The Reject Report who lived now comes to die. Wait, that’s not right. This isn’t the last Reject Report. It’s just the last one wherein we’ll be talking about a new Harry Potter movie. I know. Sadness entered my soul just typing that, too. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 in 3D and IMAX All Across the United States of America and in Certain Parts of the Great Land of Canada – I think that’s the full title now – hits theaters this Friday. Millions upon millions of eyeballs will be gushing tears as the credits roll, but Warner Brother will be hap-hap-happy about each and every one of them. Not because of the disinfecting costs on all the 3D glasses but because it’s sure to be another glowing mark in their box office books. What’s causing all this Harry Potter success? Magic. That’s what. And don’t you question it. Let’s take a look at just how badly HPATDHP2I3DAIAATUSOAAICPOTGLOC is going to trounce the competition.

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We previously reported that The Undefeated, an emo band I used to go see in high school a documentary about Sarah Palin painting her as an underdog who fought against the system to rise to prominence in Alaska (and then, of course, to the national political stage), would be released in primary states leading up to the election. However, it looks like if you live in Dallas, Denver, Oklahoma City, Orlando, Atlanta, Orange County, Phoenix, Houston, Indianapolis or Kansas City (the good one), you’ll get your chance to see it as well. According to Politico, filmmaker Steve Bannon has signed with AMC Theaters to get the doc on the big screen in select cities July 15th. That makes it counter-programming for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2, Salvation Boulevard and the new Winnie The Pooh movie. Bannon told NPR that he sees people responding to the film as a Rocky style narrative. He also mentioned that his method is in the same vein as Michael Moore, calling the documentarian a “master of the craft” and saying that he was still learning it. The former Goldman Sachs employee might be newer to filmmaking, but he’s definitely chosen a compelling figure to focus on. No matter how you feel about the politician, she knows how to get a crowd gathered.

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Disney’s July release Winnie the Pooh is shaping up to become a cross-demographic juggernaut. First off, you have the fact that it’s hand drawn, which is going to draw in a bunch of nostalgia sales from people looking to get a break from the Hannah Montana era of Disney product. Secondly, it’s a new Winnie the Pooh movie, which means everyone is going to take their kids to see it. And now, Zooey Deschanel and her She & Him bandmate M. Ward have been added to the soundtrack, which should send hipsters in their early twenties running to the theaters to have a half ironic, half too precious to pass up time at the movies with Pooh Bear.

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There was a time, decades before I was born, where if you were going out to the movies then chances were pretty good that you were going to see something with Mickey Mouse in it. That’s where Walt Disney originally made his mark, in movie theaters. Whereas we sit through advertisements before our big feature films today, back in the days of yore there would be a presentation of news reel footage and animated shorts. Through these shorts enduring icons were born: Mickey, Minnie, Goofy, Donald. These are the franchise players of the Disney Empire. But recently, they’ve felt a bit diminished to me. Sure they still appear in books, in TV shows, on countless numbers of merchandise, but it feels like Disney has walled themselves off from the rest of culture. It used to be that you saw Disney characters everywhere. Now you see them only on the official Disney TV Channel, in the official Disney Store, at an official Disney theme park. When’s the last time you saw some foreign tourist walking around in the US with a faded out Mickey Mouse t-shirt on? It might be time that Disney looks to revitalize the core of its brand. One man who is working to accomplish something like this is Burny Mattinson. His work with Disney goes all the way back to the Winnie the Pooh films of the 1960s, and he’s working as the supervising story artist on an updated Winnie the Pooh that’s set for this year. […]

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This summer Walt Disney Pictures will release the first big screen Winnie the Pooh movie in more than 35 years. The story will see Pooh Bear gathering together all of the usual cast of characters from the 100 Acre Woods on a mission to save Christopher Robin from something or other. Images from the upcoming animated feature have been released and just a cursory glance at them has childhood memories bubbling up from some dark, disgusting place inside of me. Disney hasn’t looked like classic Disney in quite a while. And by classic Disney, I’m talking about hand drawn animation featuring all of the core characters from back in the day when Walt was doing things. I know the Pooh characters aren’t Mickey and Minnie; they weren’t created by Disney they were acquired by them. But the acquisition happened long enough ago that for my childhood they all stood side by side in the Disney pantheon.

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published: 11.26.2014
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published: 11.21.2014
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published: 11.21.2014
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published: 11.19.2014
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