violence

Sundance 2013 News and Reviews

    Editor’s Note: With Sundance 2013 upon us, we’re revisiting some of our favorite shorts from Sundance years past. This wonderful little film played the 2009 Sundance Film Festival, played in our Short Film of the Day series in May 2011 and is back for another run as we kick off a week of Sundance shorts. Why Watch? Because you should think twice before buying that Christmas tree. From the director of Hobo With a Shotgun comes this classic tale of tree-xploitation, shot in pristine 70s style. It’s a bloody affair with some beautiful practical effects and over-the-top everything. We cut them down, we humiliate them with decorations, and now it’s their turn to shove tinsel up our ass. Fair warning: as with any movie where foliage commits wanton acts of violence, there’s a healthy amount of curse words. Also, be on the look out for my interview with Treevenge and Hobo With a Shotgun director Jason Eisener on Reject Radio. What Will It Cost? Just 14 minutes of your time. Trust us. You have time for more short films.

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David Cronenberg

David Cronenberg has made many types of films, but all of them are unmistakably Cronenberg. From B-horror movies to a beat literature adaptation to a film about the working relationship between Freud and Jung, the Canadian filmmaking veteran’s oeuvre exhibits a versatility of subject matter that somehow maintains consistency in style. Cronenberg’s films are known for their complicated portrayals of sex, in-your-face depictions of violence, and unmitigated explorations of human transformation, whether that transformation be from a human to a fly, a patient to a psychologist, or an east coast mobster to a Midwest suburban father. David Cronenberg got his start in underground experimental films, then made interesting low-budget B-movie horror features, and has since risen to prominence as one of North America’s most respected and revered auteurs. In August, the 69-year-old Cronenberg’s 18th feature film will be released, and he may follow it up soon with his first ever sequel. So here’s a bit of free film school from an experienced filmmaker hailing from America’s favorite hat.

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Boiling Point

I guess I’m feeling pretty violent these days, since last week I talked about how more people on TV needed to die and we’re revisiting the subject of death again this week. Though, with a slightly different slant – whereas previously I wanted more death, now I want that same amount of death, but slower. In television, everyone seems like they’re in a huge hurry to die. Granted, the world of make believe is at least as dangerous as the real one, in fact, it’s infinitely more so. In a regular day, most of us won’t contend with tornadoes, Megasnakes, Sharktopi, advanced alien civilizations, primitive monsters, serial killers, psycho killers, bank robbers or mutated man-beast hybrids. Sure, there are some exceptional days, but for the most part we don’t have as much to worry about. Regardless of what Last Action Hero says, I think we also have it safer, after all, we don’t just instantly drop dead at the slightest provocation.

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Why Watch? Mad Max meets Excite Bike for lunch and Dead Alive provides the main course. If that’s not enticing enough to get you to watch, your veins are probably filled with oatmeal. This entry into the ABCs of Death 26th Director Contest is pure, unbridled, 80s cult worshiping genius. A young man finds some Turbo gear (with a skull lodged inside the helmet) and decides to become a crime fighter. Fortunately, he gets to show off his skills with a tough biker gang of rapists out in the desert. Heads don’t just roll. They fly clean off of their necks. Plus, the soundtrack from Le Matos is chipper electronic perfection. What does it cost? Just 5 minutes of your time. Check out the trailer for T is for Turbo for yourself:

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This week, on a very special episode of Reject Radio, we talk with Lucky McKee about his disturbing new horror film The Woman. Plus, we launch a new feature for the month of October where horror filmmakers discuss a favorite horror film. This week, A Horrible Way To Die and You’re Next writer Simon Barrett praises an obscure modern classic. As if that weren’t enough, FSR Associate Editor Rob Hunter goes mano a mano with Film.com‘s Eric D. Snider in a test of wits and movie news acumen. Download This Episode

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31 Days of Horror - October 2011

When the calendar page turns to October, we Rejects have only one thought: horror. To celebrate this grandest and darkest of months, we’ll cover one excellent horror film a day for the entirety of the month. That’s 31 Days of Horror and 31 Films perfect for viewing on a dark, chilly, October night. If you, like us, love horror and Halloween, give us a Hell Yeah and keep coming every day this month for a new dose of adrenaline. Synopsis From the brilliant mind of Shane Meadows, Dead Man’s Shoes is a vengeance-soaked slasher, told from the perspective of the slasher, and as raw as an exposed nerve in places. It focuses on Richard (played by the inimitable Paddy Considine), who returns from seven years military service to his hometown in a town within Meadows’s particularly grim version of modern Britain. His intentions become clear very quickly, as he seeks to confront a gang of locals who have committed some unspoken attrocity on his mentally disabled brother, Anthony (Toby Kebell), who follows him around as he stalks and terrorises those responsible with increased ferocity. The film is underpinned by a piquant and ominous dread, as the secret of what happened to Anthony is slowly revealed, as Richard’s venom intensifies, and his vengeful acts of retribution cut a bloody swathe through the Midlands landscape.

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The Holding begins with a dark action and stumbles its way through thriller territory, making pit stops along the way to undermine itself every time it starts to get gritty. Cassie Naylor (Kierston Wareing) is a tough woman whose farm is struggling, whose teenage daughter Hannah (Skye Lourie) is rebelling, and whose youngest daughter Amy (Maisie Lloyd) is beginning to get curious about everything around her. Even though a friendly old man called Cooper (David Bradley) helps out with the cows and the sewage pump, the holding is still not turning a profit. Bills are piling up, and Cassie’s neighbor Karsten (Terry Stone) is overtly obsessed with buying the land one way or another. That’s when aimless drifter Aden (Vincent Regan) enters the picture. He solves a few problems for Cassie and her young girls but ultimately becomes one himself.

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This week, on a very special episode of Reject Radio, we speak with legendary actor Ron Perlman about his white dreadlocks in Bunraku, we’ll chat with The Dark Knight Rises executive producer Michael Uslan about his incredible journey to bringing Batman to the screen, and we’ll talk with Brian Salisbury and Luke Mullen about favorite films from Fantastic Fests past to get excited for the debauchery of this week. Plus, Screenrant editors/Screenrant Underground Podcast hosts Ben Kendrick and Rob Keyes fight to the pain in our Movie News Pop Quiz. Is it any wonder we end up talking about Qwikster? Download This Episode

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Why Watch? Because yesterday we featured something sweet and romantic, and we can’t let that go unpunished. Fair warning: this short film is horrifying and graphic. It features a man distraught by the dark world of his TV-lit room who ultimately picks up a knife and hurts the only entity he’s capable of hurting. It’s excruciating. It’s calculated. It’s also beautiful in its torturous visuals. Again, it’s dangerous. Don’t watch it unless you can handle it, and consider yourself fully warned. Take a deep breath, and let us know in the comments if you make it all the way through. What Will It Cost? Just 10 cruel minutes of your time. Check out Snip for yourself:

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It started with a conversation I was having with my friend Robert about Salo. You’d be surprised how many ideas for articles arise from discussing this film. Not so many dinner plans, though. Makes sense for a film subtitled 120 Days of Sodom. Anyway, being avid film lovers, we agreed Salo was a film we were glad we had seen despite the inability to ever be able to “unwatch” it. We love film, and we love the notion we could sit through and appreciate a movie like Salo despite the graphic imagery therein. This spiraled the conversation into other films that our desensitized minds could handle, films we could observe from a film-lover or even a critical perspective even though they had imagery that could not be unseen. An hour later, we had disgusted ourselves to the point of seppuku, we went our merry separate ways, but a lingering idea was stuck in my head. Amidst all the onerous images I had conjured back into my mind from years and years of watching whatever whenever, a nugget of a question remained. It was basically this: As a film connoisseur, can you desensitize yourself for the sake of cinematic appreciation?

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At first glance, the idea that Warners would want to make a movie about the little wooden boy whose nose grows when he tells a lie seems moronic. Not only has the tale been tried before to disastrous results, it’s also been tried before to transcendent results – giving the world a Disney version that continues to act as the prime example of the story’s existence on film. However, with Dan Jinks producing, it’s a bit of a different story. Jinks (funny name, serious producer) was on board for Pushing Daisies and for Big Fish, as well as Milk and American Beauty. The point? He has been involved in some great projects so dismissing him outright for shooting for the wishing star here is a bit premature. He’s going to need help. That’s where this handy guide comes in. If you’re thinking about making a movie about Pinocchio, here’s a simple way to make it great.

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Hideo Nakata is going to shove ten people into a bunker and make them murder each other. Get excited.

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This week, on a very special episode or Reject Radio, Landon Palmer attempts to explain why his fascination with nun orgies hasn’t gotten his Masters degree taken away from him.

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bp-jerseyshore

Robert Fure gets teased by the tale of violence on MTV, then lashes out when he’s denied his blood lust.

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NicolasWindingRefn

Nicolas Winding Refn is a great filmmaker. He’s also an avid toy collector and a man obsessed with violence and criminals. Watch how these things come together as we enter the mind of the man who gave us Bronson.

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ff-LoveExposure

Watching a 4-hour long movie may seem daunting, but it’s an incredible reward when the flick involves love, religion, cults, bloodbaths, lesbianism, perversion and, of course, upskirt pictures.

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AlamoDrafthouseCinemapocalpyseNazi

I braved the wilds of Austin’s Alamo Drafthouse in order to get pummeled Inglorious Basterds and 5 other fantastic, fireball-laden, violently satisfying films that left my blood-lust quenched and me questioning whether or not I’d lost my sanity before or after the marathon began.

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This is a chord everyone can hear, because it rings true to all ears – unless they belong to an executive at a studio.

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Mel Gibson needs booze money… Let’s have another release of Braveheart on DVD!

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published: 11.26.2014
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published: 11.26.2014
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published: 11.21.2014
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published: 11.21.2014
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