Twitter

Scottish actor Christopher Malcolm, who was a regular screen presence through the early seventies through the late eighties, and a cast regular on hit British comedy Absolutely Fabulous, died today at the age of 67. His passing was confirmed by his daughter, playwright Morgan Lloyd Malcolm, via Twitter. Today the world lost a beautiful, brilliant man. My dad Christopher Malcolm left peacefully and with dignity. He will always be my hero. X — morgan lloyd malcolm (@mogster) February 15, 2014 In addition to his television and film roles, Malcolm was an accomplished, classically trained Shakespearean actor, beginning his career with the prestigious Royal Shakespeare Company in England. He performed in standards like “Macbeth” and “Hamlet,” though his push to mainstream audiences came during his appearance as Brad Majors in The Royal Court Theatre’s original run of “The Rocky Horror Show” in 1973. While a number of the stage cast transitioned to Jim Sharman’s big screen adaptation, The Rocky Horror Picture Show, in 1975, Tim Curry amongst them, Malcolm was replaced as Brad by Barry Bostwick.

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guardiansofthegalaxy

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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The Birds

A few decades after the halcyon days of Mad Men, advertising began to give way to a terrible step-child called Public Relations. The goal of PR was to build brands because, as it turns out, telling people to like your product is much harder than having someone else tell people to like it. In fact the former is pretty close to impossible — otherwise new companies would pop up constantly with promises that their widget was the best, and we’d nod our heads thinking, “They seem honest and legit! Five widgets please!” There’s a lot of science to explain why we don’t trust advertising, and a pretty great book on the subject, but there’s a fundamental problem (for companies) with PR. While you can completely control the ads that people don’t trust, you can’t control public relations. At least not as much as you’d like. You can’t eat your cake and entice people to buy it, too. To be fair, movie studios have accepted that shift relatively well — probably because PR solves the age-old problem of having to advertise a new product (and make millions of people believe in it) every other month or so. But now that the Aint It Coolism of internet movie sites has reached gargantuan levels, studios are scrambling for some semblance of control over the things they don’t want out in the open yet. The latest, biggest example is Paramount sending copyright violation notices to random Twitter users for sharing Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles concept art.

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Listen, I know we all love Twitter (don’t we?). The short-yet-still-sweet posts. The bird-shaped logo. The ability to follow your favorite celebrities and find out the intimate details of their eating and sleeping habits. Yet it’s not enough to simply Tweet your Tweetings on Twitter. Nor is it enough to watch Tweets cycle through the lower third of every TV show in existence or see entire TV series aired on Twitter. No, what we truly need is TV show about Twitter – and Lionsgate Television has graciously stepped in to fill that niche. The studio is crafting a show out of Nick Bilton‘s best-selling book, “Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship and Betrayal,” which documents the rise of the 140 character social media craze. You see, Twitter was the product of four men – Evan Williams, Jack Dorsey, Christopher Stone, and Noah Glass. And then, Williams had Glass fired from the group and expunged from the history books (at least, the rare history books that would mention the founding of Twitter). Despite being one of the original creators, Glass was left behind to watch the social media platform rocketed up to the multi-billion-dollar mark, where it currently sits as the eleventh most popular website on the planet.

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jim_carrey_kick_ass_2_trailer

Opinions change. Yours, mine, Jim Carrey‘s… we’re all allowed to reassess our views when new information presents itself, but very few of us will see that new opinion cause anything resembling an uproar. Carrey’s stance on gun-control has been pretty clear for months now thanks in part to his musical Charlton Heston dig on Funny or Die and multiple tweets on the subject via his official Twitter. Some people have badgered him to denounce the supposed hypocrisy of his upcoming Kick-Ass 2 seeing as it features gratuitous violence both gun-related and otherwise, but while he refused to do so then it appears he may have had a change of heart. He took to Twitter earlier today with the following two thoughts.

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City of God director Fernando Meirelles is just off the publicity tour for his latest film, 360, and already he’s looking to get work started on his next project, Nemesis, which is an adaptation of the Peter Evans book “Nemesis: The True Story of Aristotle Onassis, Jackie O, and the Love Triangle That Brought Down the Kennedys.” As you would probably expect from that title, Nemesis is set to be a drama focusing on the famous Kennedy family, or more specifically, the rivalry between Aristotle Onassis and Bobby Kennedy. At one point Kennedy investigated the magnate’s business practices and ended up getting him barred from trading in the United States, and the book goes as far as to assert that the conflict between the two escalated to the point where Onassis ended up financing Kennedy’s assassination. That’s heavy stuff involving some very iconic figures, so Meirelles is going to have to put together a pretty amazing cast in order to do the material justice. And, to that end, he’s taken to Twitter in order to stir up some interest from one of the best actors working today. This morning Meirelles tweeted the following, “Fazendo elenco de Nemesis. Que tal Fassbender para fazer o Bobby Kennedy?” I know what you’re thinking…those words look like gibberish. Well, it turns out Meirelles speaks this whole other language that isn’t even English. Luckily, through the magic of Google technology, we’re now able to translate that what he was tweeting roughly reads, “Making cast of […]

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Boiling Point

Some big time shows are finally back on the air and with them has come an air of excitement and, of course, the urge to share your opinion of what happened with everyone in the entire world, because you have something of value to offer. Like a 140 character recap of what happened! You should be a writer. I am smiling so smugly right now. For better or worse (definitely worse), Twitter and Facebook are things that are going to stick around. Whether or not we even like them, we use them. They’re how we connect with friends both close and distant and they keep us abreast (a breast, hahahahaha) of what’s currently going on in the world, like why you hate waking up, how bad your dog’s fart smells, what you ate for lunch, and that question you have that you typed into Twitter instead of Google. Unfortunately, one of the things that goes on is television. And movies. On different timetables. We all get excited about entertainment, that’s why we’re here together on this site right now. But I think we can all agree that spoiling stuff makes you a dick. So here’s the thing about tweeting television….

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Movie studios have been using testimonials to market their films for years. Most frequently, they rely on professional film critics to supply pull quotes for use in advertising. While some of these quotes are genuine, some are simply generated on demand by media hounds who just want to see his or her name on a movie poster or in a TV spot. In the industry, we disrespectfully refer to these folks as “quote whores.” Quote whoring is big business to some, giving them attention from the studios with perks and junkets. Being in the inner circle of quote whores is kind of like being in the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. There’s lots of benefits and little responsibility. However, there’s a disturbing recent trend in Hollywood that jeopardizes the institutionalized quote whore’s well being, and it comes in the form of social media.

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A few weeks ago, legendary indie producer Ted Hope (21 Grams, American Splendor, Martha Marcy May Marlene, and 50 other movies) spoke at the Athena Film Festival as part of their “From Script to Screen, Producing Films in Tough Times” panel. He was the token male amongst the solid producing presence of Lisa Cortes (Precious), Susan Cartsonis (No Reservations), Nekisa Cooper (Pariah), and Mary Jane Skalski (Win Win). With considerable experience working outside the studio world, they offered advice and encouragement, and Hope was nice enough to spread it to the world at large through his twitter feed. He was unavailable to clear up who should be credited for which piece of advice, but it’s a safe bet to assume that the panel agreed on these points at-large. Not only are they essential for aspiring filmmakers, they also provide a window into the world for movie fans. No matter what side of the screen you’re on, there’s something here for everyone.

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Boiling Point

They say laughter is the best medicine and well, world, I’m dying here. I need my medicine. I need to laugh. I need to be entertained, but it seems every time I try to chuckle these days, someones standing right there to make me feel bad about it. Over the last few weeks in this column, I’ve mostly pointed the finger at big corporate entities bowing to some outside force, whether it’s a perceived notion that they must be politically correct to the point of being historically incorrect or whether it’s removing a joke that probably cost thousands of dollars to animate to not offend a small handful of people in a far off land with a disease that’s rapidly disappearing. Today, I point my finger elsewhere. I point it at you. I point it at them. I point it at us, a society that has lost its sense of humor – and that is a damn shame.

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What is Movie News After Dark? It’s a nightly collection of movie and television news that throws caution to the wind, but never ever pees into the wind. That’s just not smart, friends. We begin this evening and this week with artist Kinjamin’s depiction of the Community cast as the characters from Street Fighter. It was found via Twitter, as posted by the show’s executive producer Dan Harmon. Needless to say, it’s inspired. So inspired, perhaps, that it makes us hope that Harmon is writing this one down. How about a Street Fighter episode in season four? Hey NBC, how about a season four?

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In our first show of the 2012 season, we set off the filmmaking fireworks by finding out why Innkeepers director Ti West doesn’t believe in spooks, and by talking to indie icon Ed Burns about the twitter revolution, his $9,000 budget, and his new must-see movie Newlyweds. Plus, Neil Miller stops by to dangle the hope and potential of 2012’s most anticipated movies over our noses. Will he say the movie you’re thinking of and validate his opinion to you, or will he neglect it, making everything he says in the future suspect? Be prepared to find out a metric ton about movies and their makers, because it’s our third season, and we’re only getting started. Download This Episode

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Can an indie filmmaker upset the apple cart twice in a career? Evidence seems to point to Edward Burns doing just that, quietly dominating a niche audience without the aid of big budgets (or any budgets really) and without the hollow aid of buy-the-bank advertising campaigns. His first bow on the scene was in 1995 with Sundance favorite The Brothers McMullen, and now he’s capitalizing on the same social networking tool that protestors are using to overthrow dictators: Twitter. At a time when Hollywood is struggling, post-movie star, to figure out what works, Burns is exercising a formula that involves tiny bottom lines and an audience that already trusts and reveres his work. It’s almost certain that few filmmakers will be able to rise to prominence through Twitter, but since Burns is a known entity dedicated to finding his fans and engaging with him, he’s been able to make back money with ease and tell the stories he wants to tell. His latest is Newlyweds, a slice of life written/directed/produced and starring Burns as one-half of a newly married couple whose lives (much like an apple cart) are upset by a half-sister coming on the scene. As the thorough Christina Warrren over at Mashable explains, Burns shot the flick for $9k and raised massive awareness for it and for his process using the little blue bird of tweeting. He also found talent through it. Her full article deserves a read, and in a time where mature adult situations are nearly […]

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Comic-Con is around the corner, and while our dance card is filling up, we’ve carved out some time to hang out with veteran film critic, author, and film historian Leonard Maltin. Unlike two years ago when we ended up hanging out by the San Diego docks with Tom Jane and the Raw crew at 3am, we’ll be keeping it a little tamer this year at the Movies On Demand lounge inside the Hard Rock Hotel on Saturday, July 23rd from 3-5pm. So what does our drinking in the afternoon have to do with you winning $500? Great question. Speaking of questions, we need them for our conversation, and we want to give you the chance to win that half-thousand-dollar gift card just for sending us yours. Here’s how to enter:

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What is Movie News After Dark? It’s a movie news column that wonders: “does your daddy know that it sneaks into your room every night?” In a slightly less creepy description, it’s a column that, as of tonight, is of two minds: one that thinks about movie news and is seemingly on vacation, and another that is all about television. Like The Adventures of Pete and Pete. No, seriously. Tonight’s top story is an imperfect first look at Colin Farrell in the Len Wiseman directed reboot of Total Recall. Some sites are dedicating primo space to such an image, so I thought I’d throw it up there because it’s a decent sized fish on a day where news has been flowing into our nets plentifully. In other non-fishing references, the Total Recall character looks a lot like plain old Colin Farrell. Nothing to see here, I suppose.

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What is Movie News After Dark? It’s a nightly movie news round-up that finds the darndest things. Like Sacha Baron Cohen’s beard, creepy Musketeer posters, Mark Wahlberg, Simon Pegg, Paul Walker and a way to make your tweets into epic cinematic adventures. You need this and you know it. We begin tonight with Sacha Baron Cohen looking crazytown as The Dictator, his latest mockumentary prank film. Only this time, it’s got a more concise narrative. Cohen will play the dual roles of a ruthless dictator who heads to the U.S. for a meeting at the United Nations and finds that his number two has replaced him with an unsuspecting sheepherder lookalike. The big guy has sort of a Cosmo Kramer meets Mr. T vibe going on, with all the frills of the late Saddam Hussein. That feeling deep in your loins is unbridled excitement. That’s a good thing.

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Haven’t seen enough Kim Kardashian on your TV and in your news over the last 12 months? Well then do I have some good news for you. Kardashian had a number of comments to make about a prospective new career while red carpeting around at the SAG awards. She started her threats by telling E! cameras, “I love acting”, which seems like it could have been harmless enough chitchat if she hadn’t also claimed, “There are a few offers on the table, but I definitely want to make the right decision for the right part.” And what could that “right part” be? Well, genre fans, get ready to weep.

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What is Movie News After Dark? This is a question that I am almost never asked, but I will answer it for you anyway. Movie News After Dark is FSR’s newest late-night secretion, a column dedicated to all of the news stories that slip past our daytime editorial staff and make it into my curiously chubby RSS ‘flagged’ box. It will (but is not guaranteed to) include relevant movie news, links to insightful commentary and other film-related shenanigans. I may also throw in a link to something TV-related here or there. It will also serve as my place of record for being both charming and sharp-witted, but most likely I will be neither of the two. I write this stuff late at night, what do you expect?

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We have had precious few comedies of quality made about high school students over the past ten years. Teen comedies used to be a staple of the multiplexes, the places where studios grub money from teens and tweens who have borrowed a twenty-spot from their moms, but they have been all but decimated in recent times by the merciless reign of the generic horror flick. Election came out in 1999, so what good ones did that leave us in the aughts? Only Mean Girls by my estimation. You did like Mean Girls right? Combining a great script from a pre-30 Rock Tina Fey and perhaps the most buxom cast of young actresses ever assembled made it one of my favorite comedies of the decade. One time I watched it with a room full of hung-over college friends mostly in slow motion. It took us about five hours, but it was worth it. Well, Paramount has decided to rob us of our treasured memories by creating a low budget, direct to basic cable/DVD sequel, and unleashing it upon the unsuspecting masses.  Mean Girls 2 debuted Sunday night, January 23rd on ABC Family, and until about 3 PM the next day the term “REGINA GEORGE” was trending on Twitter. Regina George is a character from the first film, played by Rachel McAdams, and one click on the trending topic revealed a steady stream of Twitter users who loved the first film bemoaning a sequel that doesn’t include the character. I can’t imagine […]

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Culture Warrior

The Social Network is nothing new, but that’s kind of the point. Its structure creates a story of uniquely American ingenuity, individualism, and capital that we’ve seen often, one that follows beat-for-beat the formula of young, ambitious, humble beginnings to meteoric rise toward contested success to the people that really mattered being inevitably pushed out of the way. It is in The Social Network’s belonging to that subgenre which draws apt comparison to films like Citizen Kane, Sweet Smell of Success, or There Will Be Blood – not qualitative comparisons, mind you (the very title of Citizen Kane has become an inescapable and meaningless form of hyperbole in that regard), but comparable in terms of basic narrative structure and genre play. Such narratives are perhaps more common in films depicting less legitimate business practices – gangster films – which also catalog the rise in stature but fall in character of an outcast who uses the system for their own advantage. From starry-eyed associations with questionable made men (Timberlake’s Sean Parker and the debaucheries of success associated with him) to the inevitable “hit” on one’s kin in the best interest of the business (Zuckerberg and Parker firing Eduardo Saverin), The Social Network is something of a Goodfellas for geeks. Why is it that the first major studio film about the phenomenon of social networking feels like such a familiar movie? Why does it resort to well-honed, expertly crafted but familiar cinematic territory instead of pioneering unexplored terrain analogous to the phenomenon […]

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published: 10.30.2014
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published: 10.29.2014
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published: 10.27.2014
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published: 10.24.2014
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