Tribeca Film Festival

MV5BMTU2MjE3MDU4OV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjE0MDQzOQ@@._V1._SX640_SY360_

Clark Gregg’s 2008 Choke may be the lesser known of the cinematic world’s big screen Chuck Palahniuk adaptations (it is, after all, hard to compete with names like Fincher, Pitt, and Norton), but the multi-hyphenate’s directorial debut adeptly translated the author’s trademark black humor to the screen without a hitch. For his second feature, Gregg again goes in for funny stuff with a truly dark edge and, for at least its first half, Trust Me is more brutally and bruisingly amusing than just about any other current comedy around. But Gregg’s stellar first half ends with one hell of an abrupt, tone-changing twist, and he’s never able to fully reconcile his dark humor with true darkness. Trust Me takes its audience inside the twisted world of dealmaking amongst Hollywood elite – specifically, the twisted world of dealmaking amongst Hollywood elite trying to capitalize on the talent and ability of would-be child stars. Gregg is still interested in trafficking in regular guys with extreme problems – while his Choke centered on Sam Rockwell’s otherwise-average-beyond-that-crushing-sex-addiction Victor, Trust Me focuses on Gregg’s Howard, a sad sack Hollywood agent trying to find the next big kid thing. It’s not easy and it’s not fun and Howard’s particular career path seems like the most weirdly soul-crushing career path imaginable. But Gregg’s Howard doesn’t know any better and he doesn’t know anything else – he’s been in the game since he was just six years old, back when he was a child actor himself, and it’s […]

read more...

Bluebird

Comparisons to Atom Egoyan’s The Sweet Hereafter will likely plague Lance Edmands’ Bluebird, thanks to the films’ similar subject matter – both are set in snowy small towns, both center on a tragedy that occurs on a school bus, both find their drama in the aftermath – but Edmands’ new feature quickly finds its own footing and announces the arrival of a talented new independent filmmaker. Bluebird approaches its seemingly familiar plotline with a tighter focus than Egoyan’s, as Edmands spends the majority of his film with school bus driver Lesley (Amy Morton), a kind and well-intentioned woman whose life is destroyed by a minor moment of distraction. During an end-of-shift bus check, a trilling bluebird draws Lesley’s attention away from the task at hand, with the hautning consequences of her bird-watching not revealed until late the next morning. Lesley is, however, not the only person at fault in Bluebird (the accident at the center of the film is a unique and jarring one, and is best revealed within the film), though she is the one most obviously culpable. While Lesley is absorbed with the titular bluebird, across town young Marla (Louisa Krause) is similarly engaged, but with depression, drugs, and drinks. As with Lesley, we do not know the full extent of Marla’s negligence until many hours later. Lesley and Marla’s small, twin mistakes bloom outward, and Bluebird maps the fallout from common missteps in an unforgiving world. It is, simply put, deeply heartbreaking.

read more...

Mistaken for Strangers

If you asked Matt Berninger what his younger brother, Tom Berninger, thinks of indie rock, he’d tell you it straight: “he thinks indie rock is pretentious bullshit.” Which is a bit of a problem, because Matt is the lead singer of beloved indie band The National and Tom is about to go on tour with The National to capture a documentary about, well, The National. Will Tom change his mind about indie rock? Probably not, but he might just change his mind about just about everything else. The basic plot of Berninger’s Mistaken for Strangers is almost eerily movie-ready. The National is, as one journalist puts it, a band of brothers – a group composed of the Devendorfs (Scott and Bryan) and the Dessners (Aaron and Bryce, who also happen to be twins, just for good measure), along with lead singer Matt – and while Tom is ostensibly coming on tour to help out with basic roadie duties, he’s actually there to make a movie, but he’s really there to reconnect with his brother.

read more...

Mistaken for Strangers

If you’ve somehow missed our relentless reportage on the subject, the Tribeca Film Festival kicks off later this week with the premiere of Tom Berninger‘s Mistaken for Strangers, a tour documentary about Berninger’s time on tour with his brother’s (Matt Berninger) band The National. The film’s first trailer is a solid mix of standard tour stuff (life as a rock star is wacky!), family drama (it looks like the Berningers get down to some long-needed heart-to-hearts in the film), and performances by the band. Basically, a perfect music doc. Jam out with the first trailer for Mistaken for Strangers after the break.

read more...

Tribeca Film Festival

The spring film festival season is about to kick off in a big way with the opening of New York’s own Tribeca Film Festival later this week, and with a schedule that spans eleven days and includes hundreds of features and shorts, the festival is crammed with solid picks for everyone from the casual moviegoer to the hardcore cinephile. This year’s Tribeca is a more down-to-earth affair than it has been in years past (there’s certainly no massive Marvel film opening of closing Tribeca 2013), and that’s a good thing for movie fans looking to make some true discoveries. Here at NY Reject HQ, we’ve already spent plenty of time poring over the fest’s schedule, all the better to bring you the very best that the festival has to offer. We’re reasonably sure we’ve already picked out some winners for you (just reasonably, really). After the break, check out Team Rejects’ twelve most anticipated films of the Tribeca Film Festival. Trust us, this is one list that has everything.

read more...

Tribeca Film Festival

Now that the Tribeca Film Festival has rolled out their impressive feature slate and their massive shorts program, the fest has revealed the complete lineup for their seventh annual Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival. Per the fest, “this year’s film program features a selection of sports and competition-themed films that celebrate competition, passion and teamwork, and reflect the diversity of filmmaking in this genre,” which includes nine films, four of which are a part of ESPN Films’ “Nine for IX” series (a new series focused on celebrating the fortieth anniversary of Title IX, which consists of a full nine documentary films about women in sports directed by outstanding female filmmakers). The world premiere of Kevin Connolly‘s Big Shot  (yes, that Kevin Connolly) will kick off the fest-within-a-fest with a gala screening on April 19th. Connolly’s latest explores John Spano’s fradulent purchase of the New York Islanders in 1997, which ended up being “the biggest fraud in hockey history.” Check out the full lineup for the Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival after the break.

read more...

Tribeca Film Festival

Now that this year’s Tribeca Film Festival has unveiled their feature slate (to remind you of the great lineup, check out HERE, HERE, and HERE), the fest has now rolled out their ironically huge short film slate, which includes a massive sixty films, including thirty world premieres (a new record for the festival), along with one special screening. This year, Tribeca has divided their giant shorts program into eight thematic programs – including five narrative categories, two documentary categories, and one experimental category – with sections dedicated to New York City and vampire and werewolf themes (juicy). Some of the shorts also include performances by such recognizable talents as Lauren Ambrose, Kevin Corrigan, Elle Fanning, Jessica Hecht, Nastassja Kinski, Julian Sands, Jay O. Sanders, Dominic West, and Elijah Wood. With such a depth of theme and talent, Tribeca looks to be offering a short for everyone. And, hey, if you don’t like them, they’re, well, short. Check out the full listing of all the just-announced shorts (and their respective categories) after the break.

read more...

S-VHS

On the heels of yesterday’s announcement of the festival’s World Narrative, World Documentary, and Viewpoints sections, the Tribeca Film Festival has now unveiled the rest of their (quite exciting) feature line-up. Announced today are picks from the Spotlight section (featuring 21 narratives and 12 documentaries), the Midnight section (formerly known as Cinemania), Special Screenings, and the brand new Storyscapes section (a “multi-platform transmedia program celebrates new trends in digital media and recognizes filmmakers and content creators who employ an interactive, web-based or cross-platform approach to story creation”). There is a lot here to get amped about, including the New York premiere of Ramin Bahrani‘s Zac Efron-starring At Any Price, the New York premire of Before Midnight, the U.S. premiere of lady vampire drama Byzantium, the U.S. premiere of Greetings from Tim Buckley, the Zoe-Kazan-in-a-dual-role The Pretty One, the New York premiere of the apparently-retitled V/H/S/2, and lots more. The complete list of films selected for Spotlight, Midnight, Special Screenings, and projects in Storyscapes is available after the break.

read more...

Tribeca Film Festival

New York’s own Tribeca Film Festival has previously announced its Opening Night Film, rock doc Mistaken for Strangers, and now the fest has begun rolling out the rest of their slate, including today’s announcement of their World Narrative and Documentary Competition titles and their Viewpoints section. As part of newish Tribeca tradition, each section will also have its own “Opening Night” film, with Big Men opening the World Documentary competition, Bluebird opening the World Narrative competition, and the documentary Flex is Kings kicking off the Viewpoints section. All three films will premiere on April 18th. Guess which one features Adam Driver. Check out the full listing of all the just-announced titles after the break.

read more...

This contest is now closed. All winners will be receiving an email. Thanks! In filmmaker Lee Kirk‘s directorial debut, The Giant Mechanical Man, a love story unfolds between two directionless thirtysomethings whose unhappy lives are only exacerbated by their professional failures. Jenna Fischer‘s Janice has just taken on yet another dead-end job selling concessions at a local zoo, where Tim (Chris Messina) has also recently had to take a job as a janitor, seeing as how his main job (being that titular “giant mechanical man” as part of a street performance) doesn’t pay the bills. The film recently premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival, and we’re pleased to present an exclusive clip from the film here on FSR. In this scene, the two cross paths on the job and begin to form a bond. In celebration of The Giant Mechanical Man‘s Tribeca premiere and subsequent theatrical release, we are also giving away five (5) signed posters from the film. To win one (1) signed poster, all you have to do is jump down into the comments section and let us know about the worst job you’ve ever had. Please also provide your email address in your comment so that we can email winners. This contest is only open to U.S. residents. The contest will close Sunday, April 29th, at 9:00PM EST. The winners will be chosen at random from those who reply in the comment section, and they will receive a signed poster from The Giant Mechanical Man, as described […]

read more...

Inspired by an moving true story, Travis Fine‘s Any Day Now may be set in the ’70s, but the story’s elements feel like a story ripped from today’s headlines. The film stars Alan Cumming and Garret Dillahunt as Rudy and Paul, a happy (though closeted) couple who discover something truly unexpected in their neighbor’s apartment – teen Marco (Isaac Leyva), abandoned by his drug-addicted mother and left to his own devices. Even worse? Marco has Down syndrome, and no one else in his life is able or equipped to handle his needs. Except Rudy and Paul. The pair eventually take in Marco and begin to form a happy and stable family together. But when their arrangement is discovered, and Rudy and Paul’s relationship is outed, it kicks of a legal battle that will decide just who Marco really belongs with. With a compelling story and an extremely talented cast (that also includes Frances Fisher), Any Day Now should emerge as one of the highlights of this year’s Tribeca Film Festival. After the break, check out the exclusive poster debut for Any Day Now, along with a batch of new stills from the film.

read more...

It’s back to the Big Apple with another batch of some of the most compelling titles that this year’s Tribeca Film Festival has to offer. This time around, we’re zinging over to Thailand for an eye-opening spin on the crime noir (no other film this year will make you want to invest in a helmet more), before zipping back to the U S of A and over to the left coast for two films about life in Los Angeles, relationships on the rocks, and cinematic twists that both surprise and sustain. Which one of these films marks the voice of an exciting new independent director and which will leave audiences begging for more, of all things, gimmicky behavior? As is the best part of all film festivals, let’s discover something new. Check out our latest batch of mini-reviews for Headshot, Caroline and Jackie, and Double or Nothing after the break.

read more...

What’s always most exciting about film festivals is the range of different films available for watching and enjoying – all within the same period of time, and often in the same venues. That’s just as evident as ever in this year’s Tribeca Film Festival line-up, a festival that has kicked off with The Five-Year Engagement, will end with The Avengers, and will show over 200 films in between. Our first round of Tribeca reviews only highlights that variety of films, as it include a French actioner, an true American independent, and a dramedy about ladies of the night. After the break, check out mini reviews for Sleepless Night, Supporting Characters, and Elles – all very different Tribeca Film Festival films, and all films likely to find their own unique audiences in the Big Apple and beyond.

read more...

This contest is now closed. All winners will be getting an email with prize details. Desperate for that film festival experience, but didn’t plan ahead to get tickets? Want to see the best of what the Tribeca Film Festival has to offer? Live in New York? Have we got a giveaway for you! Here at Film School Rejects, we’re pro-film festivals, and we want our own dear readers to share in the experience – that’s why we’re giving away a special pack of screening tickets for you and a guest to take in not one, not two, but three whole films this weekend at the Tribeca Film Festival. Our special ticket pack include two tickets each for: Benji on Friday, April 20th at 6PM, Rat King on Friday, April 20th at 11:30PM, and Eddie the Sleepwalking Cannibal on Saturday, April 21st at 11:30PM. To win the ticket pack, which includes 2 passes to each film (got that? you win, you get six tickets?), all you have to do is jump down into the comments section and let us know which film you’re most looking forward to checking out in beautiful Gotham (you can crib from the Tribeca Film Festival film guide right HERE). Please also provide your email address in your comment. This contest is only open to U.S. residents, and we’re going to have to ask that you’ll actually be in New York City to use the tickets. The contest will close tomorrow, April 20th, at 1200PM EST. The […]

read more...

With the Tribeca Film Festival kicking off today, it’s high time we dove into our coverage of New York City’s hometown fest. To that end, it’s our great pleasure to debut the first poster for writer-director-producer Jenny Deller‘s Future Weather, the multi-hyphenate’s first feature, which will have its world premiere next week. The film centers on young Lauduree, a lonely teenager who has a serious interest in environmentalism and nature and who is already worried about the effects of environmental disaster on the world at large. But it’s Lauduree’s world that is about to be turned on its head, when her shiftless single mom leaves her for sunshiny California. Abandoned, alone, and terrified, Lauduree comes under the care of her grandmother, who comes with her own pack of issues that shouldn’t serve much comfort to the already fragile Lauduree. The film stars a wonderful cast of known and new talent, including Lili Taylor, Amy Madigan, Perla Haney-Jardine, and Marin Ireland. The film has already racked up the accolades, having received a grant from Women in Film in 2011 for post-production, three grants from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and the 2009 Showtime Tony Cox Award for Screenwriting from the Nantucket Film Festival in 2009. You can learn more about the project and watch a few clips from the film at their Kickstarter page. Check out the full poster for Future Weather after the break, along with a batch of new stills from the film.

read more...

Meeting Evil writer/director Chris Fisher joins us to talk about how necessary movie stars are to getting financing in the indie world (and how to talk to Samuel L. Jackson on set). Plus, we go beyond the headlines to explore the Alamo Drafthouse‘s expansion into New York City with CEO Tim League and to push the envelope of film festivals with Tribeca Executive Director Nancy Schafer. Download Episode #129

read more...

The Avengers

Wow. People holding Tribeca badges and passes just got a kick in the pants from a dude in a metal suit, a guy who rips his purple shorts with rage and a host of other dysfunctional family members. According to their latest press release, the Tribeca Film Festival is closing its 2012 calendar with The Avengers. At a film event that celebrates James Franco’s eccentricities alongside indie filmmakers famous and not-yet-famous alike, this is a blockbuster move – one that the fest is using no doubt for publicity and as an opportunity to celebrate the heroes of New York City and beyond. Firemen, police officials, military personnel and others will have a special chance to join in on the screening. Marvel head Kevin Feige weighed in, saying, “We are proud that Marvel‘s The Avengers is the closing film of this year’s Tribeca Film Festival and we are excited to welcome local heroes to the screening as special guests. We all know and love our iconic Super Heroes, but when it really counts, it’s our real-life heroes who save the world every day by making it a better place for all of us.” Despite its normal focus on the obscure, this fits well with the Tribeca mission which arose from the ashes of 9/11 as a means to prop up the New York City economy and to celebrate its art. On another level, it’s a booking that’s incredibly cool and makes native New Yorker Joss Whedon very happy. The director had this to […]

read more...

Earlier this week, our own Cole Abaius announced the first wave of this year’s Tribeca Film Festival‘s film lineup. That assault was impressive enough, complete with lots of compelling picks in the World Narrative Feature Competition, World Documentary Feature Competition
, and Viewpoints sections, but today’s release of the final feature film sections is a whole other volley of firepower. With today’s announcement of their Spotlight, Cinemania, Special Screenings, and the 2012 Tribeca/ESPN Sports Film Festival, the fest has completed their feature announcements – and made me start to wonder if I should try to hit Gotham for the festival, running April 18 – 29. Picks that stand out to me already include the delightful 2 Days in New York, Chicken With Plums, Don’t Stop Believin': Everyman’s Journey, The Giant Mechanical Man, Headshot, Lola Versus, Take This Waltz, Your Sister’s Sister, and Sleepless Night. Check out the full list of films (along with Tribeca-provided synopses) after the break.

read more...

Panos Cosmatos‘s first film Beyond the Black Rainbow, which premiered at last week’s Tribeca Film Festival in New York, is like nothing you’ve ever seen. Or, it’s reminiscent of many things you have seen. Like a faded memory, an amalgamation of every sci-fi/horror between 1970 – 1985, Black Rainbow is an exercise in aesthetic and genre. Set in a futuristic 1983, the film stars Michael Rogers as the leader of a secret laboratory, running tests on a telepathic child in an effort to – wait. No. Watching the events unfold in Black Rainbow is half the fun, the other half being entirely unsettled by the creepy visual style and piercing audio track. It’s engrossing. I sat down with Cosmatos to talk about bringing Beyond the Black Rainbow, the inspiration for moody throwback and creating a world that’s both familiar and completely unique.

read more...

With the ninth annual Tribeca Film Festival under way in New York, Robert Levin chimes in with some reviews. First: Robert Duvall and Bill Murray in ‘Get Low.’

read more...
  PREVIOUS PAGE
NEXT PAGE  
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3