Toronto International Film Festival

Bird People Movie

Bird People is a series of misconnections. After a blissful prologue paying homage to Wings of Desire, Pascale Ferran’s fourth feature listlessly morphs into a bizarre confluence of realism and magicalism. The film is a textbook example of ambition undercut by tonal and pacing inconsistency. Divided into two chapters, Bird People leads with Gary (Josh Charles), a Bay Area businessman ready to “leave everything behind,” as he proclaims. Ridden with anxiety, Gary knows he needs to leave his position at his growing Tech Company, his wife (after 18 years of courtship), his kids, and his current way of life. From one airport hotel to the next, he seems unable to experience joy or happiness.

read more...

Focus Features

The Toronto International Film Festival always comes crammed top to bottom with star power, lining up both big name stars and buzzy films that are already firmly in the “Oscar conversation” before the first curtain even goes up. But TIFF is still a film festival, and that means for every Benedict Cumberbatch-starring biopic, there’s a slightly smaller and definitely less well known feature just itching to bust out. This year’s festival is no different, and there are a hefty number of films and talent to keep your eyes peeled for, from total newbies to known names who are just on the cusp of something bigger. Who will emerge from this year’s TIFF a bonafide star? We’ve got some ideas.

read more...

The Imitation Game

This Labor Day, we are laboring over exactly one thing: our schedule for this week’s Toronto International Film Festival. The annual Canadian embarrassment of riches kicks off this Thursday, and we’re in the middle of a mad dash to make sure our schedules and plans allow for viewings of everything we want to see. It’s not easy — in fact, with a slate as stacked as TIFF’s, it’s actually impossible — but we’re dead-set on cramming each day with top-tier talent, Oscar contenders and a few smaller features that just might break out once they unspool during Toronto’s best film event. But what are the true can’t-miss features? We think we may have some idea. What will be lining up for at this year’s TIFF? Why, the same stuff you should be lining up for, too.

read more...

TIFF

We may be within spitting distance of this year’s Comic-Con, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t spend some time getting excited about the next next big event: this September’s Toronto International Film Festival. The festival has now unleashed the first bit of its slate, and it’s already the kind of talent-packed, big name-crammed, jaw-dropping kind of thing we’ve long come to expect from the festival. Honestly? I’m sort of already packing my bags right now, because I don’t want anything slowing down my ability to see a whole mess of these films (even excessively and embarrassingly early preparations). This announcement includes thirteen Galas and forty-six Special Presentations — just a smidge of the festival’s full slate, really, but the one that’s the most glitzy and recognizable — which includes thirty-seven world premieres and plenty of films we’ve been waiting a long time to see. Eager to see what TIFF has to offer? After the break, take a look at every single film announced today, including twenty-three titles that already have us excited to decamp to Canada in two months.

read more...

Jodorowsky Dune

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

read more...

EbertTiff

By the time of his death in April of this year, Roger Ebert had firmly established himself as being, among other things, the most famous film critic of all time. For decades, filmmakers and film fans from all over the world relied on Ebert’s writings and television broadcasts to not only illuminate us on what treasures the film world had available for us that we might not have already seen, but also to deepen our understanding and appreciation for the great works that we had. He was one of the voices who helped elevate the world of movies from being viewed as a commercially-driven entertainment racket to being to seen as a legitimate art form as worthy of dissection and discussion as any other, and because of that the film industry has taken every opportunity over the last few months to pay tribute to the man as often as possible. The most recent of these tributes came at the just-ended Telluride Film Festival, and now we have word [via Deadline] that the next is going to come during tomorrow night’s opening of the Toronto International Film Festival, where the fest is scheduled to begin with a video tribute to the esteemed critic—including comments from festival co-founder Bill Marshall, former festival director Helga Stephenson, producer Robert Lantos, and others—as well as with the presentation of a commemorative plaque to Ebert’s widow, Chaz. The plaque will match one that will also adorn a theater chair that has been dedicated to the legendary […]

read more...

Bell Lightbox

Back in March, Vimeo created a new distribution model for filmmakers by offering a ridiculously attractive 90/10 revenue split and access to a 100-million-strong audience. Now, they want to use Vimeo On Demand to deliver Toronto International Film Festival movies to the world. According to Variety, the company is offering a flat $10,000 to each of the 146 premieres happening at TIFF in exchange for exclusive digital distribution rights for 30 days (or until Vimeo recoups the 10k) followed by the standard VOD revenue split. This kind of open-door distribution offer is equal parts exciting and risky, and it shows an incredible (well-earned) trust in the discernment of the TIFF selection committee. This will undoubtedly be a great option for the large number of films that will find success on the festival circuit while never securing traditional distribution, but there’s definitely an experimental tilt. Vimeo might end up eating losses for movies that never earn back the cash, and filmmakers who put their work online (even at such a respectable venue) may injure their chances for larger-scale theater distribution in the future. It’s the ancient choice between small, immediate satisfaction and the potential opportunity for bigger success further down the line. Regardless of the gamble for Vimeo and for filmmakers, this is excellent news for fans. We’ll gain access to movies that would normally require a passport, and as this is offered to more fests, it’ll be as if entire indie lineups will be at our fingertips instead of at […]

read more...

Silver Linings Playbook

In a word – no. Over the weekend, the Toronto International Film Festival wrapped up and, like the end of all good things, the festival closed out with the bestowing of awards to various films. Winners included Artifact, Seven Psychopaths, Laurence Anyways, Keep a Modest Head, Antiviral, Blackbird, Call Girl, In the House, and the big winner – David O. Russell‘s Silver Linings Playbook. The Bradley Cooper- and Jennifer Lawrence-starring film won the BlackBerry People’s Choice Award, which is generally considered to be TIFF’s most important award and an indication of a film’s chances at a Best Picture nomination come Oscar time. As Wikipedia tells it, “Given that the festival lacks a jury and is non-competitive, regular awards handed out at other festivals for categories such as ‘Best Actress’ or ‘Best Film’ do not exist at the Toronto International Film Festival. The major prize, the People’s Choice Award, is given to a feature-length film with the highest ratings as voted by the festival-going populace.” Plenty of stories on the film’s win have noted that this all but guarantees that Silver Linings will end up with Oscar nominations, particularly a Best Picture nod. And why is that? Over the past five years, two People’s Choice winners have gone on to win Best Picture (The King’s Speech and Slumdog Millionaire) and one film picked up a nomination in the same category (Precious). Good odds, right? Well, maybe not so much.

read more...

Robert Redford in The Company You Keep

Just last week we reported that Robert Redford’s latest film, The Company You Keep, managed to score a distribution deal before it even played any festivals. Well, the film is gearing up to play Venice and Toronto regardless, so TIFF has released a trailer promoting it. Complete with typewriter sounds and vintage news footage, said trailer starts off by making The Company You Keep look like it’s going to be an authentic, journalistic look at the history of the radical anti-war group The Weather Underground, but then we’re suddenly dumped into present day, and it’s revealed that this is actually going to be a fun-looking chase movie about the last few members of the movement still being on the run from the law. The Company You Keep is full of grizzled old activists/bank robbers, plucky young reporters, plucky young F.B.I. agents, action, intrigue, murder, and a cast that features names like Redford, Susan Sarandon, Shia LaBeouf, Brendan Gleeson, Anna Kendrick, Terrence Howard, Nick Nolte, Sam Elliott, Richard Jenkins, Chris Cooper, Brit Marling, Julie Christie, Stephen Root, and Stanley Tucci.

read more...

Rachel McAdams in Passion

The past decade hasn’t been too kind to Brian De Palma. The director’s past few films have been his most divisive and critically lashed efforts of his career. With disappointments like The Black Dahlia and Mission to Mars, it’s easy to see why that is. After a five year absence, De Palma is returning to the big screen with Passion, an “erotic” thriller starring Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace that’s a remake of the recent French film Love Crime. The film is set to premiere  at the Venice Film Festival, which will then be followed up with screenings at both TIFF and the New York Film Festival. Check out the film’s first trailer to see Rachel McAdams and Noomi Rapace having…a good time, shall we say:

read more...

The lineup for this year’s Toronto International Film Festival is essentially an embarrassment of riches (we’re still fanning ourselves over the sheer magnitude and quality of their first wave of programming announcement), and it’s only gotten better today with the news that the fest has added no less than sixty new films to their slate. These picks round out their Documentary, Midnight Madness, Vanguard, Kids, Cinematheque, and City to City programs, and if you weren’t drooling before, get ready to positively salivate. Stand-out picks include Matthew Cooke‘s How to Make Money Selling Drugs, Alex Gibney‘s Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God, Janet Tobias‘ No Place on Earth, Marina Zenovich‘s Roman Polanski: Odd Man Out, Benjamin Renner, Vincent Patar, and Stéphane Aubier‘s Ernest & Célestine, the world premiere of The ABCs of Death, Nicolás López‘s Aftershock, Martin McDonagh‘s Seven Psychopaths, and so, so, so many more. Check out full synopses for each newly announced film after the break, thanks to both TIFF and The Playlist. As ever, our top picks will appear in italics.

read more...

When we Rejects get let out of the cage (and it’s a literal cage, a big one under Dear Leader Miller’s desk, with a hamster wheel and everything) to journey to festivals far and wide, we tend to turn in some pretty comprehensive coverage. Along the way, we often cover some films that pop up along the festival circuit for months on end, titles that show up at Sundance and then journey west to SXSW, that premiere at Cannes before going American at LAFF, and those that parlay good buzz at one fest into showings across the globe. We’ve already drooled over today’s announcement of the Toronto International Film Festival‘s first wave of programming, but buried within those 62 just-announced films are five we’ve already checked out at other festivals (including Sundance and Cannes). Want to get a taste of what TIFF will offer (hint: tastes like poutine and makes your mouth water just as much)? Hit the break to get reacquainted with 5 TIFF-bound films that we’ve already seen (and, in many cases, already loved).

read more...

Joseph Gordon Levitt in Looper

The Toronto International Film Festival has today announced (via Cinema Blend) their (assumed full, but clearly still ripe for additions) line-up of both their Galas and Special Presentations sections. Just two sections? Sounds slim, right? Wrong. Today’s announcement includes a stunning sixty-two total films, including some of the year’s most anticipated, along with a bevy of “oh, hey, that’s ready to go already?” titles sure to stir up just as much excitement as the other heavy hitters. Toronto will play host to such films as Rian Johnson‘s Looper (which will serve as the Opening Night film), Ben Affleck‘s Argo, Robert Redford‘s The Company You Keep, Mike Newell‘s Great Expectations, David O. Russell’s Silver Linings Playbook, Joe Wright‘s Anna Karenina, Neil Jordan‘s Byzantium, Andy and Lana Wachowski and Tom Twyker‘s Cloud Atlas, Sally Potter‘s Ginger and Rosa, Thomas Vinterberg‘s The Hunt, J.A. Bayona‘s The Impossible, Joss Whedon’s Much Ado About Nothing, Derek Cianfrance‘s The Place Beyond the Pines, Jacques Audiard‘s Rust and Bone, and – no big deal – Terrence Malick’s To the Wonder. It’s okay to be out of breath – this is easily the best festival line-up of the year. After the break, check out the full list of TIFF’s just-announced Galas and Special Presentations titles, with our own most anticipated films singled out, all the better to help plan your own TIFF-going (or TIFF-coverage-reading).

read more...

Merantau was an astonishing achievement in martial arts storytelling. It displayed incredible hand-to-hand combat work while managing to have a compelling story with solid acting. Go figure. Essentially, it made a lot of other action filmmakers look like amateurs, and it looks like Gareth Evans and Iko Uwais are returning with a stripped down flick to repeat the feat. The Raid is currently enjoying praise coming out of TIFF with hyperbole and review titles featuring exclamation points aplenty. Does it earn the hype? The trailer offers one clue, and you can check it out for yourself (if you’re old enough):

read more...

Greek filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos’ Dogtooth is decidedly divisive cinema. The film played on the festival circuit back in 2010 (I took it in at SXSW in a tiny screening library room, via DVD on a tiny television) and ended up garnering a surprise Best Foreign Film nomination at the Oscars, but all that certainly doesn’t mean that the film is fit to be enjoyed (or possibly even consumed) by everyone. The film focused on a Greek family with three adult children who had been isolated from the world by their parents (namely their father) and taught to fear not only other people, but nearly everything else, especially cats. To further their isolation, the kids were taught incorrect meanings for words, leaving them essentially unable to express themselves to others, should they ever encounter them. There was also an incest storyline. Sound heavy? It was – and wasn’t. Dogtooth is wonderfully unsettling cinema, littered with humor darker than coal, and more messages about family and society than you could count on your fingers and toes. I loved it, but I also absolutely understand why other people don’t. Now Lanthimos is back with a new film, Alps, which will premiere at this year’s Toronto International Film Festival. Much like Dogtooth, the film looks to imagine an alternate sense of reality within the regular world. In the world of Alps, members of the titular group perform a service – they “stand in” for deceased people for their grieving loved ones. And, like Dogtooth, […]

read more...

With the Toronto International Film Festival mere weeks away, cinephiles everywhere are prepping to ship off to America’s hat for ten days of films and fun, all fueled by bagged milk and and trademark Canadian politeness. TIFF has already established itself as North America’s premiere film festival (duking it out with Sundance for top billing), but this year, the festival’s programmers have truly outdone themselves when it comes to putting together a drool-worthy schedule. This year’s TIFF has already announced the bulk of their lineup, including The Ides of March and Moneyball and their documentary and genre picks, but they now round out their programming with some final and spectacular picks.

read more...

If the only music that will play in the post-apocalyptic world will be Explosions in the Sky, someone hit a big red button on an atomic bomb so I can strap on some leather and guns and go cavorting around a disseminated landscape, because that sounds like an excellent time. And Shawn Ashmore is there? Blow this damned planet sky-high! The Toronto International Film Festival has recently released the titles that will form its Midnight Madness program this year, and that includes a film with all those elements, and more – Douglas Aarniokoski’s The Day.

read more...

Last week the programmers for this year’s Toronto International Film Festival introduced the main course of this year’s festival lineup, fifty-three films from all over the world, big and small, about any number of subjects. The list was so impressive I ran out and booked a hotel room. So, now that I’m financially locked in to heading up to the city of David Cronenberg and that rapper who called himself SNOW, I’ll be following future announcements by the festival pretty closely. Today brought a big one. Adding to their initial lineup of films, TIFF has added a bunch of documentary works by fairly large documentary filmmakers and a bunch of genre works from fairly deranged genre filmmakers. First let’s take a look at some of the docs. Thom Powers is the lead programmer for documentaries, and about this year’s lineup he said, “I’m thrilled at the large number of veteran filmmakers who have brought us new works this year. The line-up contains a wide range of memorable characters – crusaders, convicts, artists, athletes, nude dancers, comic book fans, dog lovers and more. Not to mention the epic 15-hour Story of Film. These documentaries will have audiences discussing and debating for months to come.” I don’t think I’ll have time for that fifteen hour one, I’ve only got five days in the city, but the one about nude dancers is definitely on my docket.

read more...

If you’re like me, then you probably don’t pay much attention to what goes on in towns outside your own. As far as I knew, the only thing Toronto had going on was gripes about Maple Leaf hockey and reminiscing about when The Kids in the Hall used to play that tiny theater down the street. But what do I know? I haven’t been there since The Ultimate Warrior pinned Hulk Hogan at Wrestlemania 6. Turns out they have a really awesome film festival every year. This year the events go down between September eighth and the eighteenth, and the first fifty or so films announced for the lineup have me wanting to take a trip. There are too many to discuss, but just to give you an idea of what we’re working with, let’s look at a few.

read more...

With movie websites getting clogged with stories and reviews about movies that will never reach the public, are film festivals more ado about nothing than we’d like to admit?

read more...
NEXT PAGE  
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 12.18.2014
C-
published: 12.17.2014
B+
published: 12.15.2014
B
published: 12.12.2014
D+


Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3