Tim Roth

GRace of Monaco

Way back in September, our own Samantha Wilson quite sagely compared the first teaser for Olivier Dahan’s Grace of Monaco to “the world’s most expensive perfume commercial,” a little slice of action that is “what you expect a princess’ world to look like — rich and opulent.” The Nicole Kidman-starring Grace Kelly biopic was presented as an opera-infused tale of, well, just like a lot of sparkles and shine and fuzzy filming, sort of as if Dahan is someone who really likes watching that Charlize Theron commercial for Dior in slow motion but then wanted to spice that look up by filming stuff his own production through six layers of cellophane. In short, not great. But after some behind the scenes drama involving Dahan’s final cut, the apparent demands of Harvey Weinstein, and a release date shove, Grace of Monaco is finally set to hit theaters with a possibly tweaked look and feel. But does that translate to this new full-length trailer? Let’s find out.

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GRace of Monaco

While Naomi Watts has garnered attention and a teensy bit of criticism for portraying the People’s Princess in Diana, Nicole Kidman is preparing to step into another iconic princess’ slippers: Grace Kelly. Though the teaser trailer for Olivier Dahan‘s Grace of Monaco is just a sliver of a minute long and could potentially be the world’s most expensive perfume commercial if you’re not paying too close of attention, it provides a beautiful little glimpse into what you expect a princess’ world to look like — rich and opulent. That opera music is just naturally occurring, too. They didn’t add that in during post. Check out the trailer for yourself here:

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roth

Seeing a genuinely great character onscreen nowadays is a rarity. Fantastic fathers, especially, are even harder to come by, but with director Rufus Norris‘s coming-of-age tale, Broken, Tim Roth plays just that: an honorable, loving dad. Archie’s neighbor in the film is the polar opposite. He’s a yelling, unhinged presence who, most actors of Roth’s pedigree, would probably feel more drawn to. Instead, Roth opted for Archie, taking the chance to play a genuinely good man. We spoke with the actor about the different dads he’s played, and the way he approaches every set he gets to work on.

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Jackie Chan

What is Casting Couch? It’s a column that has a lot of new casting news today, so settle in. Even after only two movies, the number of aged action stars who have yet to appear in Sylvester Stallone’s Expendables series has dwindled down to a select few. So, given his age, his lengthy resume, and the way he’s linked almost exclusively to the action genre, Jackie Chan has to be seen as one of the biggest fish out there that Stallone has yet to catch. It looks like that’s going to change in The Expendables 3, however, as Chan has told Cinema Online [via Coming Soon] that Stallone has invited him to join the cast of the film, and he has agreed to appear as long as it’s in a featured part and not just a cameo. Looks like we might finally get our chance to see Dolph Lundgren get beat up with a ladder.

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This Tuesday is the 20th anniversary of the theatrical release of Reservoir Dogs, the film that not only put Quentin Tarantino on the map as an era-defining filmmaker but also gave the 3rd wave ska scene its own Phenix City Story (or Guns of Navarone or Dr. No or Scarface). Never mind the movie’s immediate legacy, though, because two decades later the story of “five total strangers” who “team up for the perfect crime” has outlasted the oddly inaccurate marketing (i.e. those lines from the posters, which also feature Chris Penn in a suit), the many copycats, the ska album samplings and even the overshadowing success and popularity of Pulp Fiction as the director’s big breakthrough to remain a significant pioneer and classic of American independent cinema. During its run in U.S. cinemas, which followed a debut at Sundance and appearances at Cannes and Toronto, not to mention earlier openings in parts of Europe, Reservoir Dogs never played on more than 61 screens, yet it earned close to $3 million. I’m certain it never hit my town in the suburbs, but I recall the first time ever hearing about it via a drawing of an ear in Entertainment Weekly illustrating a short note about the famously violent scene (my memory of this could be slightly off). And like so many of the film’s fans, I didn’t see it until the video came out the following Spring, at which time the torture bit became just one of numerous memorable moments. In […]

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Arbitrage 2012 Film

Editor’s note: With Arbitrage hitting theaters this week, here is a re-run (totally free! no financial risks to you!) of our Sundance review, originally posted on January 22, 2012. Last year’s Sundance Film Festival featured a break-out hit with J.C. Chandor’s Margin Call, a taut and talky tale of investment bankers trying to chuck bad money and bad books in the early days of the financial crisis. Chandor’s film cleaned up nicely on the awards circuit, and it’s surely paved the way for screenwriter and documentarian Nicholas Jarecki‘s feature film debut, a sexier sister to Margin Call.  Arbitrage brings out the big guns to tell its twisted story – starring Richard Gere as hedge fund magnate Robert Miller attempting to sell his family business, with Susan Sarandon as his charitable wife Ellen, Brit Marling as smarty-pants daughter Brooke, and the ever-solid Tim Roth as a police detective steadily cracking open their rarefied lives. Here, Jarecki has crafted great atmosphere – we understand the Millers’ lifestyle and relationships within mere minutes, and the film holds that tone and that feel throughout its perhaps slightly-too-long runtime. Arbitrage is slick and watchable, well-made and with some nice surprises, but it’s void of any sense of humanity, and seeing rich people doing bad stuff doesn’t amount to stick-to-your-ribs cinema.

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Arbitrage Movie

The feature narrative directing debut of writer and documentarian Nicholas Jarecki features a flaming car, a businessman, and way too much money on the line to tell the truth. Arbitrage – starring Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon, Tim Roth, and Brit Marling – is the story of a car accident that threatens to derail the gravy train of a morally-questionable man facing a large merger. The trailer makes a huge impact. It’s incendiary and thrilling, hopefully marking the arrival of a stunning work of drama. Not too bad for a movie channeling a super sexy macro-economic pricing theory. Check it out for yourself:

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Over Under: A New Perspective on Films New and Old

I break Quentin Tarantino’s career up into two stages. The first stage consists of his first three films, which are all crime movies, are all set in L.A., and which all just feel very much like “Quentin Tarantino movies” (a genre unto itself back in the 90s, if you lump in all the pretenders). After those first three films, he took a pretty lengthy six year break, and then he came back and started exploring other genres, making movies that were largely homages to the B-cinema he enjoyed in his youth. While there’s a soft spot in my heart for most of Inglorious Basterds, in general I prefer that first stage of Tarantino’s career to what came after. And as far as that first trilogy of crime films goes, I think most people are in agreement that Pulp Fiction is the masterpiece. It was the one that broke down the doors of the movie industry and ushered indie filmmaking into the mainstream, and it’s the one most often referenced when people talk about his career; so I’m not going to focus on that one here. I’m going to focus instead on Tarantino’s debut feature Reservoir Dogs, which was the film that first got heads turned in his direction, and which still gets mentioned right alongside Pulp Fiction as badass things from the 90s. And also I’m going to focus on Jackie Brown, which is kind of the forgotten Tarantino film. This is one that doesn’t get brought up much these […]

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Editor’s Note: With Ashe taking a much needed vacation, we turn to the insightful talent of writer Maxwell Yezpitelok for this week’s list. Go read more of his work. But read this first. And then go check that stuff out. Woody Allen has to have one of the greatest casting directors in show business, if we overlook the fact that for some reason they keep casting short middle-aged Jewish guys opposite women like Julia Roberts, Scarlett Johansson and Charlize Theron. But seriously, look at all the big name stars that keep showing up in his movies, sometimes for the whole movie and sometimes for just a few seconds. In honor of that genius scene in Midnight in Paris where Adrien Brody completely kills it as Dali (only to never again), here are the greatest actor cameos in Allen’s forty-something films:

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giveaway-lietome

I don’t know how many of you had a chance to check out Lie to Me, but it is a pretty awesome show. Now we have a pretty awesome giveaway for our pretty awesome readers. We have three copies of Lie to Me: Season One to give away, so keep on reading for the goods.

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Blu-ray Review: The Incredible Hulk

The Incredible Hulk is one of those movies — the kind that you should probably be buying on Blu-ray either way. Though, it would certainly be the laziest review of my career if I were to just chalk this up to ‘see it because its in HD’, so I will attempt to break it down a bit.

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Inglorious Basterds

Quentin Tarantino has kept his fans waiting for his remake of the World War II “Dirtier Dozen” movie, leading some to call him an inglorious bastard himself. Well, the script’s finally out and we’ve learned a lot, including that Brad Pitt may want in, as well as the fact that Tarantino likes to spell ‘bastard’ the wrong way.

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The Incredible Hulk Smash!

In the tradition of X-Men and Spider-Man, this version of The Incredible Hulk is a solid adaptation for the big screen that retains its comic book feel.

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The Incredible Hulk

After the emotionally draining experience that was Iron Man in early May, the fanboy inside of me was sure that there was no way that Marvel Studios could go two-for-two in the Summer of ’08. Go figure, I was wrong.

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The Marketing of The Incredible Hulk

Movie marketing! You can’t live without it. Trailers, tie ins, internet promotions, action figures, lunch boxes. They’re part of what drives the movie business especially when it comes to big budget action films like the new The Incredible Hulk.

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The Incredible Hulk

Why does it feel like The Incredible Hulk is the odd-man out when it comes to this year’s summer movie line-up? In my mind, it has something to do with the slow manner in which Universal Studios has marketed the film, waiting until only recently to release the first teaser trailer. Or at least, that is how it may seem. Few people realize that The Incredible Hulk is seemingly on pace with movies that come out near it, namely The Dark Knight. What might have thrown us all off is the barrage of media being thrown out there for Iron Man, Marvel’s other big superhero flick this summer. We forget that Iron Man will be here in a few weeks (Yes!), while Hulk is still a few months away. But enough about the waiting game, today we have something new, courtesy of National CineMedia. It doesn’t show us much more footage from the film than the first trailer, which isn’t much at all, but it does go into the story a bit. This should help explain the non-origin story better for those who were worried. Personally, I am warming up to The Hulk, getting excited, and hoping that he doesn’t get buried in the mix of summer movie marketing all at the same time. Watch the behind-the-scenes featurette below: [flv:http://media.filmschoolrejects.com/clips/incredible-hulk-bts.flv 480 290] The Incredible Hulk is directed by Louis Leterrier, who previously brought us The Transporter series. The script was written by Zak Penn (X-Men 2, X-Men 3) and then […]

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Funny Games

Just like last year’s No Country for Old Men, Funny Games plays with the conventions of movie violence and asks us “Why” do we accept it? [Grade: A-]

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Does watching a hoidy-toidy family of stiff shirts play “Name That Tune” with opera CDs make you wish you could watch them die? If so, Funny Games is a movie for you.

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Funny Games

German Director Michael Haneke talks about the shot-for-shot American remake of his “message free” thriller.

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Incredible Hulk Logo

Ed Norton rises up as The Incredible Hulk! Finally!

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