The Walking Dead

Scream Factory

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! If you see something you like, click on the title to buy it from Amazon. The Legend of Hell House The Belasco House had seen its fair share of tragedy and carnality even before the man who had it built disappeared, but the years since have seen a continuation of death and terror. It’s known as Hell House, the Mt. Everest of haunted houses, and now a team consisting of a scientist, his wife and two mediums is going in to prove once and for all whether or not ghosts and the afterlife exist. Two of them are going to find out first hand before the week is out. Richard Matheson’s novel (Hell House) was adapted to the screen way back in ’73, but it remains one of the best haunted house flicks out there. There are legitimate chills throughout, some PG-rated sexiness and a wonderfully intense performance from Roddy McDowall too. Even better, at least for someone like myself who favors grounded explanations, the script gives nods to both the supernatural and the scientific. [Blu-ray/DVD extras: interviews, trailer]

read more...

THE WIRE 3

The Weekend Watch is an open thread where you can share what you’ve recently watched, offer suggestions on movies and TV shows we should check out (or warnings about stuff to avoid) and discover queue-filling goodies from other FSR readers. The comments section awaits. I’ll get the ball rolling with the movies/TV my eyeballs took in this weekend.

read more...

FablesFSR1

Last year, Telltale Games did what many people thought would be impossible: they took the smash hit comic book The Walking Dead, and turned it into a point and click adventure game. It was a real triumph in video game storytelling, with much of the game contingent on conversation and player choices. But more than that, it channeled pure emotion into the hands of the gamer, and plenty of jaded, cynical naysayers were moved to tears while playing. On top of that, the game was released in an episodic format, although you can purchase the complete experience as one whole package now. Of course, the game came at a perfect time, with the white hot Walking Dead television show on AMC, which in turn spurred sales of the comic book and created an appetite for this game. But based on the show and many issues of the comic, you would expect that the game would be Sheriff Rick’s Zombie Shooting Gallery, not a tearjerking piece driven by the characters. In fact, the game focused on new characters, without a Rick, Daryl, or Shane in sight, as it is set while Rick is in a coma. You will see several familiar faces, but what Telltale drives home is that this is not Rick’s story. There are plenty of other survivors out there, along with their own stories to tell, and the game went against the odds and blew everyone away in the process. If you haven’t played it yet, I highly […]

read more...

discs le tableau

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! As always, if you see something you like, click on the image to buy it. The Painting A painting of a far away kingdom reveals glimpses of people, but unseen is a caste system separating the perfect Alldunns from their lessers, the incomplete Halfies and the ghostly Sketchies. The Alldunns look down on the others treating them as less than second class citizens, but a cross-caste romance threatens to upset the status quo. Three of them, one from each group, are forced on the run where they discover and pass through the edge of the painting. Only to find themselves in the painter’s shack among several other discarded creations. International animation doesn’t get a lot of play here in the States, but thanks to the GKids label a few gems have been making their way into our Blu-ray players. Their latest is a French film cut from the same cloth as Pleasantville in its aversion to subtlety and fantastic mix of beauty and entertainment. The parable tackles racism, xenophobia, and more including the existential quest for meaning and a creator. And the final line and shot are simply masterful. If it weren’t for the fact that it was actually released in 2011 it would easily be the best animated film of the year this year. [Blu-ray extras: Trailer, making of, slide show]

read more...

zombietruth-1

If you’ve spent any time watching movies, reading news stories about bath salts, enjoying AMC original programming, or farting around on Facebook, you’ve encountered the question about whether a zombie apocalypse could actually happen. Zombie stories range from the absurd (in films like Chopper Chicks in Zombietown) to the allegedly realistic (most recently in World War Z), but they all hinge on the question of what you would do in a worldwide outbreak of brain-eaters. Now that zombies have become possibly the most revered monster in horror and popular cinema (with Twilight vampires not counting because they aren’t real monsters), some people have wondered how fictional the day rising up is, but since we like to think outside the coffin, we started wondering: If a zombie apocalypse did happen, how long would it actually last?

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

We made it through this entire season of The Walking Dead, dear readers. It was a long, arduous journey. Sometimes people died. There were a lot of purposefully gross zombie kills. Two crazy dictators. Many appearances from Ghost Lori. The show never exactly rose to the heights of its heart-stopping first season and now, as it ends its third season with “Welcome to the Tombs,” it never exactly redeemed itself. Sure, there was a high death count in this finale — but at what gain? Even with the Prison vs. Woodbury war finally upon us, the finale still came across as somewhat sterile, with Team Rick opting for leading a “bloodless war” against Woodbury. I applaud Rick’s sentiment, sure. I applaud the logical reasoning for the survivors to join forces and become stronger as one, united force. But while the episode’s opening was very strong, something about this finale just seemed hollow and it’s tough to put my finger on exactly why.

read more...

Dallas Roberts The Walking Dead

Sometimes Dallas Roberts ends up being more than two people in a 36-hour period. Like most actors, he’s used to switching between who he is without the cameras rolling to who he is when zombies are outside your blissful gated community, but he’s also a busy man who juggles just about every kind of acting work there is. Sometimes that means waking up one morning to play one role and waking up the next to play another. He’s made an impact in film and television over the past decade (most recently as the weak-livered Milton Mamet on The Walking Dead), and he’s also seen his fair share of the Off-Broadway stage.  Now that the third season of AMC’s undead apocalypse is over, Roberts will hit the big screen next in Shadow People and then (most likely) later this year with Dallas Buyers Club. No doubt he’ll be keeping more irons in the fire in the meantime. Fortunately, we were able to grab a few of his free minutes to talk about his goals as an actor and for him to explain the best place to go if you become a zombie.

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

Um… where to start? We got a double-crossing, a marriage proposal, a death of a main character and his subsequent zombification. A lot of stuff happened this week. But did any of it need to happen? Was there enough payoff?

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

Following the format of weeks past, this week’s episode of The Walking Dead, “Prey,” was somewhat of a departure/day trip episode, involving Andrea fleeing Woodbury with The Governor chasing after her and subsequently holding her prisoner. However, it was a far less successful episode than the other ones, in that (a) Andrea is not quite interesting or sympathetic enough to focus on, (b) Woodbury seems ridiculously close to the prison again, and (c) promising characters like Tyreese and Milton are poorly used. That being said, yes, nothing really happened. The only character from the prison, Rick, barely had any screen time and Andrea remains in deep shit with The Governor. Tyreese remained The Governor’s patsy. The Governor remained pretty crazy. Nothing progressed, which, quite frankly, it should have since there is a huge war looming between crazy dictators Rick and The Governor. We open with a flashback of Andrea and Michonne during their relatively idyllic time as a wandering, zombie fighting duo. Not to harp, but the woods seemed a lot bigger then, didn’t they? Those ladies were wandering around for episodes on end and they shockingly never ran into either the giant prison or the giant Woodbury, which are both apparently right next door to one another. Some brief backstory is revealed on the part of Michonne when Andrea asks if Michonne knew her zombie pets – apparently she did, and they weren’t all that nice in life. Girl bonding!

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

After last week’s road trip back to his hometown and the apparent close distance of everything in The Walking Dead’s universe, Rick piles Hershel and Daryl into the car… and takes another one! Well, this time it’s to Woodbury to talk to The Governor. But a change of scenery seems to be welcome these days, doesn’t it? Much like last week’s episode, this week’s, “Arrow on the Doorpost,” plays with format and is indeed a welcome change from the show’s usual one location per episode mentality. It also puts Rick directly against The Governor at long last as the two (kinda) attempt to make a deal, while Daryl and Hershel provide cover. This episode does have its drawbacks, but what it does best is pair opposing sides – Hershel with Milton and Daryl with Martinez – in a humanitarian approach, showing that despite allegiance to either Rick or The Governor. People are just people! Glenn and Maggie seem to prove this also, though via a somewhat unsanitary act of lovemaking outside the prison.

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

This week’s installment of The Walking Dead, “Clear,” is such a departure episode that I thought, for the bulk of it, that all of the happenings occurred in Rick’s head. They’re back in Rick’s hometown where he was Sheriff, which, spatially  is hard to believe, and there is a rather existential reunion between Rick and Morgan (Lennie James), who saved Rick in the first episode. “Clear” was also written by Scott Gimple, who is taking over for Glen Mazzara as the showrunner next season, so this episode is likely a harbinger of things to come in The Walking Dead’s universe. It was a relief that the show didn’t stoop to the low of having an entire episode exist in Rick’s head and while this episode did show a lot of promise, Morgan’s grim fate was a huge downer, to say the least. We open with Rick, Michonne and Carl driving on own a desolate road – they have gone off to collect ammo from Rick’s hometown in order to fight off The Governor for control of the prison. Way to go, Rick, for actually taking Cowboy Carl with you this time! Making strides in parenting!

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

So, it would seem the prison is really close to Woodbury, right? If traveling to and from Woodbury is less than a day trip for Andrea? And given the high gates around each community and their respective surveillance abilities, why didn’t they notice each other way earlier? The logic behind The Walking Dead can be questioned for days on end, but at least this week’s episode, “I Ain’t A Judas,” had a theme – loyalty – and concluded with a Tom Waits song, which is always a major plus. Andrea questions her loyalty for The Governor versus Rick, and Daryl’s loyalty is questioned for his brother versus Rick. Rick also snapped out of the crazy, Daryl and Hershel rose up as leaders, and Milton was also featured, so, on the whole? With a few exceptions, namely involving Tyreese and his crew, this week was just fine.

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

The last Walking Dead brought us the showdown between the prison and Woodbury. Was it climatic? Eh. The only character-with-a-name struck down was Axel, and he wasn’t overly integral to the show. Sure, it was somewhat of a shock that he was shot mid-conversation with Carol. And he was Carol’s one chance at gettin’ some – sorry, Carol. But it’s doubtful anyone – show character or home viewer – will miss him after this week. The showdown also seemed a bit too conveniently orchestrated in that the brothers Dixon just happened to make it back to the prison at exactly the right time. Right. Also, where were my boy Tyreese and his crew during the prison invasion? Twiddling their thumbs in their holding cell, or did the show’s writers just forget to include them? Well, neither one of those options is too great, and either way, it’s just extremely haphazard on the writers’ parts… Though The Governor did look absolutely orgasmic at the prospect of wreaking havoc at the prison and taking shots at Michonne. So good for him! And the zombie car bomb was a cool idea. This new installment of The Walking Dead, “Home,” seems to have squandered not only the Prison vs. Woodbury confrontation, but also a few other opportunities.

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

Author’s Note: There were issues with my cable last night, hence why this is posting a bit late – I had to download the episode this morning. Barring further cable-related issues, future episode reviews will post Monday morning, per usual.  The Walking Dead returned last night after a midseason hiatus, and it came back with an above average episode, “The Suicide King,” directed by television director extraordinaire Leslie Linka Glatter, of Mad Men and Twin Peaks. This episode was important in the course of the show as some of the gang finally started to question the Ricktatorship and new leaders, other than Daryl, are beginning to emerge. There were some issues, but this return episode was successful on the whole as it planted seeds for many interesting happenings to come. Both Rick and the Governor lost their shit in front of their respective followers! The Dixon brothers are out on their own! Allen and Ben pose a threat to the group… kinda! And Beth is crushing hard on crazy Rick!

read more...

Red 2

What is Movie News After Dark? It’s back in the saddle again, bringing you plenty of movie news and notes from around the web. Can’t get enough of the world of the moving picture? Let this nightly diversion be your guide. Red 2: Plaid Boogaloo – This has been hanging around a while, but there is now a plaid-filled official first look at Red 2, the follow-up to the Bruce Willis, John Malkovich-led “old guy spies” movie based on a comic by Warren Ellis. The first was a fun pic, full of Helen Mirren in an evening gown shooting a 50-caliber machine gun. If the second has any of that, we’ll be in good shape.

read more...

Frank Darabont

Though Frank Darabont’s translation of Robert Kirkman’s “The Walking Dead” comic book from the page to the small screen for AMC was a process full of tumult—given that Darabont famously fired his whole writing staff after the first season and was eventually replaced as show runner himself—it’s hard to argue the fact that the foundation he laid in creating that show was a solid one, and has resulted in a huge hit for AMC that has captured the attention of horror fans all over the world. So it should come as no surprise that his next project is going to involve working with genre-heavy material once again. Deadline is reporting that he’s just been brought on board Legendary’s upcoming reboot of the Godzilla franchise to give their script a final rewrite. The script, as it currently stands, was written by The Seventh Son scribe, Max Berenstein. Darabont’s hiring is coming at the same time that Legendary is having disagreements with two of the producers on the film, Dan Lin and Roy Lee. The basis of the disagreement seems to be that Lin and Lee were two of the people at the beginning of Legendary’s deal to license the Godzilla rights from Japanese production company Toho, so they feel that they should be getting more money than Legendary is giving them, and Legendary feels like they’re in their rights to drop Lin and Lee, which would still leave three of their people on the project with producers’ credits as well as […]

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

This week’s installment, “Made to Suffer,” is the last episode before the midseason break – new episodes don’t start up again until February — so are we made to care that we have such a long wait once this episode ends? Kinda. While this is a better episode than most of this season’s, it doesn’t quite measure up to the standards of past pre-break attempts. With a few exceptions, nothing overly exciting happens here, and the “cliffhanger” ending is hardly a cliffhanger at all. While the brotherly reconnection of Daryl and Merle is strongly encouraged, they were destined to cross paths all season. Yes, it’s a cool scene, and both Michael Rooker and Norman Reedus do an excellent job at emoting, but the scene does not come as a surprise and doesn’t create suspense. Plus, new characters from the comic were introduced – namely Tyreese – but it’s hazy whether or not his name was actually used and little to no character development from this new crew ever occurred, and that would have been a major plus. Also, why would Rick have a Shane mirage of Shane with a hairstyle/facial hair configuration that never appeared on the show? Was Shane-in-the-afterlife just celebrating Movember?  (Oh hey, Jon Bernthal.) Anyway… let’s get into the nitty gritty, shall we?

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

Comparatively to past weeks, the latest episode of The Walking Dead, “When the Dead Come Knocking,” succeeded in showing some great examples of that age-old George A. Romero zombie parable: that humans’ greatest enemies are each other. While we were treated to some great scenes of zombie violence, this episode was at its best when man fought man, even on a more psychological level. On the whole, this episode was fairly solid, except for that scene of Andrea and The Governor in their lovemaking afterglow. That probably did more to cause nightmares. Perhaps the most chilling scenes of the season so far were of Glenn and Maggie’s interrogations by Merle and The Governor. Now, Glenn was always a nice guy and it’s quite hard to watch him tied up at a chair while Merle threatens him with a knife. However, Merle, pressing a flattened knife on someone’s upper lip isn’t all that threatening… nevertheless, once the facial pummeling starts, you ache to save the wily little fellow. Michael Rooker as Merle (as usual) gets a great showcase in this episode with his ribald, white trash torture methods. He is able to convey the heightened sense of power that Merle feels over Glenn here, and soon afterward, the subservience to The Governor in a moment’s time. Backtracking, his performed control over Glenn perhaps makes up for his being The Governor’s underling in his own mind.

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

Editor’s Note: These blog entries are meant to be a discussion of the most current episode of The Walking Dead, so we recommend you watch said episode before reading to avoid spoilers. Keep your eyes peeled for them every Monday morning. On last week’s episode, The Governor was revealed to have a zombie daughter, Michonne left Andrea behind at Woodbury, Rick went into shock after Lori’s death, and Daryl and Maggie went on the search for baby formula. This week’s installment, “Hounded,” was another inconsistent one – somewhat of a mash-up between an existential one man show, a middle-aged romance film, and violent revenge flick. Revenge flick worked… the others didn’t… although this episode is important in setting up the eventual coming together of Rick and The Governor, finally marrying the prison and Woodbury. Fingers crossed the payoff will be worthwhile.

read more...

The Walking Dead Blog

Editor’s Note: These blog entries are meant to be a discussion of the most current episode of The Walking Dead, so we recommend you watch said episode before reading to avoid spoilers. Keep your eyes peeled for them every Monday morning. On last week’s episode, T-Dog was bitten and self-sacrificed for Carol, who went missing, Lori went into labor and died as Maggie gave her a C-section and Carl shot his dead mother. Meanwhile at Woodbury, Michonne grew more suspicious of The Governor, who flirted with Andrea to get her on his side. This week’s episode, “Say The Word,” is perhaps the most successful one yet this season, in that it provides a nice balance between the milieux of the prison and Woodbury and exploits the best characteristics of its most interesting characters. With a few exceptions, lot of important action goes down and primes the series for going in a more interesting place in future episodes – wishful thinking, perhaps?

read more...
NEXT PAGE  
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 12.23.2014
B+
published: 12.22.2014
C-
published: 12.19.2014
A-


Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3