Stuart Blumberg

Thanks For Sharing

Telling the story of a sex addict is no easy task, especially when it involves his first real relationship since becoming sober. The music for such a story has to hit the various notes of a person going through the transition of recovering addict to stable boyfriend – and do so while dancing around the question of whether or not this transition is even possible. Mark Ruffalo takes on the role as Adam, a five years sober sex addict, by making him a mix of confidence and humility. Christopher Lennertz’ score follows suit sounding confident at times, but also ebbing into a more reserved tone when the theme calls for it. Adam is a Type-A personality who lives in a beautiful apartment in Manhattan and seems to have his entire life together. The classical music that plays as the film begins certainly reflects this, but as the music gets more staccato, it becomes clear that there is more to Adam then first meets the eye as the true depth of his disease is revealed. Thanks for Sharing tackles some serious issues, but it’s not all doom and gloom.

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Thanks for Sharing

Mark Ruffalo has a bit of a dilemma. Five years sober from sex addiction, his character has finally decided to test the waters of dating again, only to be thrown into a relationship where Gwyneth Paltrow prances around his apartment in black lingerie. But it’s not just Paltrow; as the new international trailer for Stuart Blumberg‘s Thanks for Sharing shows as Ruffalo makes his way down the crowded streets of New York City, sex is everywhere. For a sex addict, the simple act of watching television or taking the subway to work can be enough to unravel an entire day. The film explores these trials through all of the meetings the addicts have to attend, much like an alcoholic, and the rituals they have to go through to keep on the straight and narrow; Josh Gad, as a newly recovering addict, rides his bike to work every day to avoid groping women on the subway. It seems a little heavy-handed to constantly show sexy adverstising on the NYC streets to prove the “sexy sex is everywhere/look at our society” point, but I think we’ll have to forgive it for now, considering our subjects. But somehow, the film is taking this unpleasant subject matter and spinning it into an almost lighthearted package, proving you don’t always having to talk about serious things seriously. As our own Kate Erbland described it while writing about the first trailer, it’s for people who thought Shame was too sad. Check out the trailer for yourself here:

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Thanks for Sharing

Remember that light-hearted sex addiction film by the guy who co-wrote The Kids Are All Right, starring The Hulk, Pepper Potts, and Broadway’s own Josh Gad that sounded so cool when it was first announced? Nope, we didn’t either – until the first trailer for Thanks for Sharing popped up on the ol’ Internet machine today. Turns out, sex addiction can be totally funny! Sort of! Okay, maybe! But it can definitely star Mark Ruffalo and Gwyneth Paltrow in decidedly non-Avengers roles and in a way that looks at least somewhat amusing. In short, if you wanted to see Shame and worried that it was too sad or too intense (and, as someone who saw a woman go into a seizure in the middle of the film that I’m still convinced had something to do with Michael Fassbender’s, um, performance, I don’t blame you), Stuart Blumberg‘s Thanks for Sharing just might be for you. Oh, also, Pink stars in it, too. Maybe it will be a Mark Wahlberg type thing! Don’t go on the subway and watch the first trailer for Thanks for Sharing instead, just after the break.

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She Said She Said

Why Watch? Equally sharp and absurd, this short film from Stuart Blumberg features Marisa Tomei and Elodie Bouchez as a couple who are close to ending their marriage, David Wain as a high-fiving mediator, and a few ridiculous flashbacks. Each piece of their shared history that they fight over forces them to remember the full spectrum of their relationship while creating some very funny scenarios. Especially if you’re into Aubrey Plaza making “fox babies.” The dialogue is sly, and it’s often difficult to figure out whether a line is meant as an insult or flirtation, and the talent here delivers.  It’s also sleek with smart visuals and seductive — both while sharing the calm power of generosity and when sliding a loose dress slowly up the back of its star’s legs. This comedy is a long, slow pour of whiskey with a smooth finish. What Will It Cost? About 7 minutes. Skip Work. Watch More Short Films.

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This article is part of our Oscar Week Series, where you will find breakdowns and predictions for all of the major categories. As I mentioned in the Best Adapted Screenplay post, the process of making a film involves thousands of moving parts and pieces from the actors to the director to the caterers and beyond, but arguably the most integral aspect of the process is the script. I say arguable, but I’m only being polite. The script is the most important part of a film… it’s responsible for the words coming out of the actors’ mouths, for the shifts in story, for the very tale itself. Actors bring it to life and the director makes it a visual reality, but it all starts from the script. Some folks may argue otherwise, but an original screenplay is far tougher to write than one adapted from a previously existing source. The heavy lifting has all been done for you when the story beats are already laid out in a book, play, or previous film. An original screenplay demands the writer create and craft everything from scratch, from the characters to the story, and the ones who get it right deserve a bigger statuette than their “Adapted Screenplay” contemporaries. And yes, I’m kidding. Anyone who completes a screenplay, whether it be an original or an adaptation, whether it win an award or not, whether it gets produced or not… you have my respect and awe. The nominees are listed below with my prediction […]

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beningruffalomoorekids

Indie film! Same-sex couples! Mark Ruffalo! It’s not all as sensational as it sounds, but Annette Bening and Julianne Moore are involved to let us know The Kids Are All Right.

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published: 11.26.2014
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published: 11.26.2014
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published: 11.21.2014
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published: 11.21.2014
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