Streaming Movies

netflixbuffering

As of today, a bunch of titles will no longer be available on Netflix Streaming. Hundreds in fact. According to Sam Adams over at Slate, it’s the result of several concomitant contract situations, but the tl;dr version is that pre-1986 Warner Bros. and United Artists titles are off the site, but will be available at the newly-launched Warner Instant Archive. The full list of what’s no longer available is here, but Adams has constructed a list of a few standouts, and you’ll probably be able to feel the pinch more personally when you open your streaming queue to find it much, much lighter. Studios and content owners seem to be heading toward more isolated streaming services which seek to play off the popularity of streaming without having to share the profits with anyone else, and that’s a giant mistake. It’s not that companies can’t do it themselves, although they probably can’t do it nearly as well as Netflix. It’s that part of the draw of being on a general service — and part of the appeal of how the Internet works writ large now — is that you tap into an audience you wouldn’t have normally gotten. Maybe Warners has numbers that contradict that, but in principle, Netflix should work a lot like a mall: people who would never naturally consider going in your store might check it out simply because it’s by the Orange Julius (aka the only store anyone goes to the mall for). By shifting content to their own service, Warners is […]

read more...

Netflix Business Standing

It would be easy to think that the recent announcement that Netflix beat out pay television for the rights to Disney/Marvel/Pixar/LucasFilm releases is a positive step forward, but the good news is more of a bandaid than a cure-all. Even forgetting that they won’t see new releases from Disney until 2016, the core problem for Netflix is spelled out brilliantly over at Tech Crunch by Armando Kirwin: they’re now a small fish swimming in a giant pond that they built themselves. On the business side of things, a ton of major players in other industries have jumped into the deep end of streaming, stealing a lot of potential revenue. On the fan side of things, Netflix remains a repository of mostly middling independent work, direct-to options, a handful of older films and a golden kernel of flicks that are only a year or so old. That’s the half-empty way to look at it. Of course the reality is a lot more complex, especially considering that the above graph, while accurate, is more a representation of what larger companies are able to do with a safety netted streaming service while Netflix swims alone. However, it’s not easy to imagine that Netflix’s saving grace will be in its ability to make deals like the one with Disney that make sense to its core users.

read more...

Hot Rod

Netflix just doesn’t slow down its new streaming releases, with a huge crop recently being added on the first of the month and more noteworthy titles appearing on regularly. The great variety in titles can be easily seen by taking a look a rich, slow Western-horror, an absurd comedy, a dude punching wolves in the face, a prescient media classic and .

read more...

Vertigo

Yes, the Sight & Sound list is out , so we finally know what the best movies are. Our long national nightmare is over. Jokes aside, the poll is important for one specific reason – because of the group of critics and filmmakers that it counts amongst its numbers. It provides a direct counterpoint to the IMDB and Flickchart lists that are wholly populist. Nothing wrong with that, just like there’s nothing wrong with the slow-moving consensus of a list that has trouble replacing old favorites for newer classics. It’s important to understand what fans hold in high regard, but it’s also fascinating to see what the best filmmaking and critical minds collectively believe are the best works of the seventh art. These lists are reflections purely of the taste of the group that’s voting. While the entire “Best Ever” moniker is an impossible label for any movie to wear, there’s one thing that shouldn’t be up for debate: the movies included on the most recent list are all worth spending time with. If you’re impatient and can’t wait for the rental store to open or the little red envelope to come in the mail, here’s how to immediately see the best movies of all time ever forever and ever until ten years from now. Go, Team Hitch.

read more...

Private Eye Movie

Netflix continues to impress with its wide range of titles added each week. In the past two weeks alone there have been some solid documentaries, thrillers, comedies and independent film that have been made available. Lets take a look at a detective story from South Korea and also make a stop in Montana for a intimate documentary about identity.

read more...

Tomboy Movie

The beginning of each month is an exciting time wherein Netflix dumps a large number of new titles onto their streaming service. Comb through those titles as well as others added in the past couple of weeks, and a few great titles bubble to the surface. Let’s take a look at a documentary about urban design, a drama about adolescent sexual identity, an existential Western from the vaults, and a few more movies worth streaming this week.

read more...

On the eve of the Berlinale, Swedish director Daniel Espinosa joins us to talk about waterboarding Denzel Washington and the mind games of Safe House. Plus, we look forward to a few films to catch in Berlin, and it’s Matt Singer versus Alison Willmore in a Filmspotting: SVU showdown of Movie News Quizzing. Download This Episode

read more...

We try to keep cursing in the headlines down a minimum in case small children or animals are toddling by an RSS feed, but seriously, Netflix‘s very public business-making decisions lately have demanded a little swearing. It’s a company that started with an innovative idea, but it’s also a company that provides DVDs through the postal service and streaming video. Beyond that, it shouldn’t be rocket surgery. Of course, maybe it’s not that the company has made a few bad decisions lately, but that so many have been broadcast or celebrated publicly before slinking back into the shadows of shame that is what’s so damning. The latest blunder disguised as a shrewd move? Netflix is responding to its stock prices by killing Qwikster before it was even implemented. The company had intended to split their DVD and streaming services into two products, meaning that dual-users would have had to create a Qwikster account and keep up with their Netflix streaming queue. Two queues is apparently way too much for our media-addled minds (especially when you also have Get Glue and Four Square to check into). It’s excellent to see a company respond to such vehement negative customer response, but it’s also one more sign of weakness. Instead of moving forward with the service and letting customers get used to it (or, hell, even grow to like it), Netflix has admitted it was moronic by aborting it. Hopefully this is the last bad dance step. In a short, sweet email to […]

read more...

Boiling Point

The other day I reached what one could consider the pinnacle of anger – Dr. Cole Abaius (retired) approached me about writing a Boiling Point about Netflix. Apparently the streaming and disc rental service got the good doctor angry and he did what any logical person would do – approached me to get even angrier on his behalf. At first I was somewhat reluctant to aim the anger rifle at Netflix. After all, I’ve been a subscriber for about six years and my experience has been mostly positive. For most of that six years, for a reasonable price you could get a lot of movies shipped to the comfort of your own home and later, even stream them right to your computer. But then, while using the official Netflix app, I became aware of many of its shortcomings and started getting angry. The floodgates opened – not only was I angry at the app, but I was angry at all of Netflix.

read more...

Every week, Landon Palmer and Cole Abaius log on to their favorite chat client of 1996 as LearningSpnshinIndy and GreedoSh0t1st in order to discuss some topical topic of interest. This week, the two ponder whether Netflix is dramatically changing their own movie-watching habits, whether it’s something to fight against, and whether doing your laundry during a documentary is something that should be punishable by death. Unsurprisingly, they learn way more about themselves than they ever wanted to know, and an intervention follows. Is it okay to pause a movie and come back to it later? Are our attention spans really waning? Or is this a new test for a movie’s quality?

read more...

Indie film producer Ted Hope and former high-ranking Facebook employee Chris Kelly have joined the board of a new website that allows users to stream from a library of indie and art films. I guess that’s a sign that people think this thing’s going to go places. At first glance Fandor might seem like it is a redundant service, given the existence of Netflix and Amazon, but upon inspection it actually takes a number of innovative approaches that make it an interesting new content provider to watch. The idea of making the online movie watching experience more social isn’t a new one; people have been tossing it around for a while. Netflix used to have more of a social platform built into it’s site, but they could never really figure out what they wanted to do with it, and ultimately stripped most of it away. It was just announced that The Dark Knight will become the first movie available to stream on Facebook, and I think the answer to making online movie watching more social is right there. Netflix shouldn’t have stumbled around trying to figure out their own social platform, they should have concentrated on integrating their service deeply with Facebook. One of the creators of Fandor, Jonathan Marlow, says, “Some have embraced the notion of inventing the Facebook of movies. We realized Facebook was the Facebook of movies.”

read more...

In an increasingly technology obsessed world, some people aren’t willing to put their gadgets down long enough to watch a movie. Or heck, even have a conversation with another human being. You’ve seen it happen a million times. Somebody refuses to turn off their cell phone in a theater despite the on screen warnings before the feature. Someone you’re trying to talk to at work won’t look up from their Facebook page long enough to give you their full attention. The President cancels a press conference because he’s playing Angry Birds. Okay, so that last one might be speculation, but this type of behavior is a real problem we’re facing. Well Warner Bros. isn’t letting it get in the way of their efforts to distribute films. Not too long ago they became the first company to distribute films as iOS apps, and now they have made a deal to stream their films through Facebook. The first app versions of films they created were Inception and The Dark Knight. The launching of Facebook streaming begins with just The Dark Knight. Before they’re done with you, Warner Bros. is going to make sure you’ve watched that film on every screen you own.

read more...

Online movie streaming and at home DVD distributing company Netflix has announced that they have amassed over 20 million subscribers.  They had projected to add 3.6 million subscribers in 2010, but ended up doubling that figure due to the astonishing growth in popularity of their instant streaming feature.  With all of these new paying customers profits are through the roof, rights to more content is being gobbled up, and brick and mortar video rental stores are nearly a kitschy memory.

read more...

hulu-iphone

It looks as if the folks at Hulu are once again looking for ways to keep me from being productive. Now I might be able to ignore work and watch old episodes of Doogie Howser, M.D. on my iPhone.

read more...
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 11.21.2014
D
published: 11.21.2014
B+
published: 11.19.2014
C+
published: 11.19.2014
B-, C


Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3