Stop Online Piracy Act

Earlier this year, the internet (including this site) responded aggressively to the Stop Online Piracy Act pushed into Congress by Representative Lamar S. Smith. In response, SOPA died. It was important to reject it, and it will be even more important to reject it when it comes up again. Because it will, Romero-like, inevitably rise again. In fact, MPAA Chairman Chris Dodd publicly told The Hollywood Reporter that negotiations were taking place currently behind closed doors. Of all the smug comments Dodd makes, the boldest seems the most banal: “Between now and sometime next year [after the presidential election], the two industries need to come to an understanding.” By that, he means Entertainment and Technology. Obvious? Sure. But “the two industries”? This is the kind of obtuse, hidden control that SOPA needs because it doesn’t have any real public support. Less than that, it’s actively hated. It’s not the two industries that need to come to an understanding. It’s these two industries that need to work with the people to come to a reasonable solution that doesn’t trash privacy and personal freedom.

read more...

In October of 2011, Representative Lamar S. Smith (of the great state of Texas) introduced the Stop Online Piracy Act to Congress. The bill’s aim was to bolster copyright holders in fights against those that infringe upon them, and that’s an important task. Intellectual property theft can be incredibly injurious to the victim. In fact, FSR had to cut through red tape in the fall of last year to stop a Chinese-based website from stealing its content and republishing it wholesale. Plagiarism is despicable, and stealing the hard creative work of others is too. However, SOPA is tantamount to drinking drain cleaner because your nose itches. The bill is unduly generic – granting massive powers to the government and entities who would wield it like a plaything to shut down websites for spurious reasons and to keep them down throughout what would inevitably be a drawn-out legal process. In short, for an accusation with no meat on it, some of your favorite sites could be shut down on a whim, creating both temporary and possibly permanent damage. As you can see from our masthead today, we’re in full support of the protest against SOPA (and PIPA, it’s cousin in the Senate). While we don’t know how powerful the SOPA blackout might be, we genuinely wish we could go dark as well, but it’s just not feasible for a site like ours that operates on a smile and a shoestring. Losing a day of revenue is just too much of a […]

read more...
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3