Sofia Coppola

Sofia Coppola Directing

Whosits and whatsits galore can only provide fulfillment and amusement for so long, at least that’s what Ariel the mermaid princess learned in Disney’s The Little Mermaid, an appropriately sanitized spin on the classic Hans Christian Andersen tale. If you’re familiar with any of Andersen’s works, you’re most likely aware that plenty of his works have been retooled for a wider audience – basically, kids we’re trying to keep from having horrible nightmares – though that doesn’t exactly reflect the spirit of the original works. Honestly, they’re pretty terrifying. Andersen’s take on the lovelorn mermaid princess will next hit the big screen care of an auteur who has made her bread and butter by portraying the particular ennui and pain of privilege, making it a pretty canny match. Deadline reports that Sofia Coppola will next direct a live action version of the story for Universal Pictures and Working Title, which comes complete with a script that’s been through a number of screenwriters, including Kelly Marcel (50 Shades of Grey), Abi Morgan (Shame), and Caroline Thompson (Edward Scissorhands).

read more...

The Bling Ring

On the balance of probabilities, Sofia Coppola‘s fifth feature is likely to be one of her most commercial; not only is it based on true events (in more certain terms than her edgy if sketchy Marie Antoinette), but the real life tale’s rooting in the cult of celebrity will almost certainly ensure that it earns its fair share of fans. Disappointing it is, then, that Coppola can’t wring much of interest out of the people behind the story, while the eminent appeal of Emma Watson in yet another boundary-pushing, post-Harry Potter presence is almost completely squandered in a throwaway supporting role. Though The Bling Ring is not a good film by any stretch of the imagination, it is still very much the sort of feature audiences would expect from the director, crowded with an indie rock soundtrack and featuring long, deliberate takes in order to focus on the existential ennui of the characters therein. Despite doing little with them, it is the characters which Coppola peculiarly decides to focus on instead of the facts of the case itself. The titular collective of criminals is headed by Rebecca (Katie Chang), who leads her friends to the homes of their favorite celebrities to make off with their most expensive and illusive wares.

read more...

The Bling Ring

Sofia Coppola’s latest minor opus about the perils and pitfalls of being (actually criminally this time) plagued by ennui and blind ambition, The Bling Ring, opens in limited release this week. Based on one of those “only in Hollywood” stories that, in fact, really only could and did happen in Hollywood, The Bling Ring tells a vaguely fictionalized version of the life and times of a ring of fame-obsessed teen burglars who broke into the houses of a number of big name stars in 2008 and 2009. The ring made away with the clothes, jewelry, accessories, artwork, and cash of celebs like Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan, Rachel Bilson, Orlando Bloom, Miranda Kerr, Brian Austin Green, Megan Fox, and Audrina Patridge (yes, the terms “celeb” and “star” are used somewhat loosely as it applies to a few of the victims), until they were finally caught by way of surveillance footage and anonymous tipsters. “The Bling Ring” itself is weird enough, and while The Bling Ring the movie never quite digs deep enough into what made the teen criminals do what they did (beyond wanting cool clothes and rightly assuming that Paris Hilton was too stupid to lock her front door), it’s still a nice addition to Coppola’s resume and a nifty addendum to some real life strange crime. How strange is it? One of the major players in the ring, Alexis Neiers (brilliantly played in the film by Emma Watson), was in the middle of filming her own reality show (titled […]

read more...

Bling Ring Trailer

There are a ton of great things in this full Bling Ring trailer, but Emma Watson is the absolute best. It’s very likely that her character’s conversation with the press that’s featured here could be the highlight of the entire movie. Otherwise, she just looks and sounds fantastic with her affected Valley Girl drawl and angsty airheadedness. Seriously, though. She might want to run a country someday. In the movie, she and her friends get the idea to rob from the rich and famous by paying attention to when they’re own publicity machines have them making high-profile appearances. They get caught, but they get a few high heels out of the deal. Check out the trailer for Sofia Coppola‘s latest for yourself:

read more...

The Bling Ring Emma Watson

It’s an interesting confluence of events that Sofia Coppola is following up her ambiguous Somewhere with a different kind of look at fame just as Harmony Korine’s exploitative-feeling Spring Breakers is hitting SXSW. Like a movie lovechild, the first DayGlo trailer for The Bling Ring has hit, and it shows off Emma Watson and friends dancing around, acting immortal and stealing from famous people. Ephemeral as it is, it would be unfair to judge a teaser trailer for not showing anything substantive. That’s kind of the point. To tease. But Coppola has such a history of exploring airy what-does-it-all-mean nonsense that this trailer seems likely to be an honest portrayal of what we’ll actually end up getting (even despite its energy). Check it out for yourself:

read more...

Casting on Sofia Coppola’s new celebrity-obsessed crime movie The Bling Ring seems to be coming together quite quickly. It was just about a week ago we learned that Emma Watson had signed on to become the first actor confirmed for the film, and now THR has news that she’s being joined by a gaggle more. The biggest name added to the cast is Leslie Mann (Knocked Up), who is set to play the mother of two of the female members of this teenage crime ring – but she’s not alone. This movie tells the based-on-a-true story of a bunch of teenagers who break into celebrity homes, and Coppola reportedly wants to use it as an opportunity to break in a bunch of young new actors. Perhaps the biggest break is going to come to Israel Broussard (The Chaperone), who gets to play the male lead. But, in addition to him, young actresses named Katie Chang, Claire Pfister, and Georgia Rock are all set to make their feature debuts here, and American Horror Story actress Taissa Farmiga is on board as well (in just her second feature appearance). With the members of the crime ring coming together so nicely, will it be long before we start to get word on which celebrities will be making cameos as the people whose houses get broken into? Call me crazy, but it seems like there’s some potential for hilarity there.

read more...

If you had bet that Sofia Coppola’s next film would deal with disaffected young women in some way, then it turns out you’re a big winner. And if you imagined it would be a look at the bored lives of the rich and depressed, then congratulations, you were pretty spot-on. But what may come as a surprise is that, despite Coppola’s trademark inert style, her next film is going to have something of an action element. Based at least in part on true events, The Bling Ring tells the tale of a group of fashion- and celebrity-obsessed teens in Beverly Hills who form a crime ring and proceed to break into celebrity homes. Coppola says that the film will “reveal a sobering view of our modern culture,” which sounds about right if you replace the word “sobering” with the word “infuriating.” The movie is intended to be an ensemble piece, and Coppola says of pre-production so far, “I’m excited about the young cast we’re assembling and I’m looking forward to shooting on location here in Los Angeles.” While most of the specifics of who make up this exciting young cast aren’t known, we do know that Coppola and her producers have landed a pretty huge name already.

read more...

Culture Warrior

We often don’t think of commercials as having authorship, at least not in the same way we think of movies. Commercials are created by advertising companies, by focus groups, by strategists; not by “artists.” But while the purpose of a 30-second ad may on the surface differ from the motive of a feature length film (though not always), both are media assembled through a particular economy of storytelling devices and are made often by a collaborative company of individuals. But commercials don’t often contain credit sequences, and thus the phenomenology of its making is cloaked and the personalities who made it unconsidered. The focus is on the product being sold, not the creative team selling it. So it can be surprising to find out that well-respected, top-tier, artistic filmmakers often direct commercials. Sure, many filmmakers regularly make commercials as a more lucrative and less time-consuming alternative to feature filmmaking, and there are many visual artists who have honed an ability to express their personality in various media forms, but a surprising number of supposedly cinema-specific auteurs make commercials, despite a lack of apparent monetary need or professional benefit. This subject came to my attention recently because of a series of articles on Slate last week by David Haglund about the oeuvre of the Coen brothers that included the filmmaking duo’s commercials in considering their larger cinematic contribution. It’s an interesting way to view a filmmaker’s career, for it forces you to look for their identifying traits and revisited themes via […]

read more...

Why Watch? Because kids can be so cruel. We’re lucky enough to feature some short films from directors on the rise, but we’re also lucky enough (thanks internet!) to go back and watch the early work of established talent. I’m not a big fan of Sofia Coppola‘s films, but this short shows a completely different side of her. There’s a momentum here – an almost MTV sensibility – that doesn’t exist in her other movies. Here, in a short that lies somewhere between the tones of The Virgin Suicides and Mean Girls, a group of 7th grade girls plot a secret plan based on “Flowers in the Attic.” As it turns out, 7th grade girls can be real assholes. So can everyone else. For fun – see if you can spot Peter Bogdanovich in a small role. What does it cost? Just 14 minutes of your time. Check out Lick the Star for yourself:

read more...

Culture Warrior

Last week, as I watched Quentin Dupieux’s Rubber, I noticed that the trailers on the rental Blu-Ray were all of titles sharing space at the top of my queue: titles like Takashi Miike’s 13 Assassins, Kim Ji-woon’s I Saw the Devil, and Jason Eisener’s Hobo with a Shotgun. All, I quickly realized, had been released by the same studio, Magnet Releasing, whose label I recalled first noticing in front of Nicolas Winding Refn’s Bronson. After some quick Internet searching, I quickly realized what I should have known initially, that Magnet was a subsidiary of indie distributor Magnolia Pictures. The practices of “indie” subsidiaries of studios has become commonplace. That majors like Universal and 20th Century Fox carry specialty labels Focus Features and Fox Searchlight which market to discerning audiences irrespective of whether or not the individual titles released are independently financed or studio-produced has become a defining practice for limited release titles and has, perhaps more than any other factor, obscured the meaning of the term “independent film” (Sony Pictures Classics, which only distributes existing films, is perhaps the only subsidiary arm of a major studio whose releases are actually independent of the system itself). This fact is simply one that has been accepted for quite some time in the narrative of small-scale American (or imported) filmmaking. Especially in the case of Fox Searchlight, whose opening banner distinguishes itself from the major in variation on name only, subsidiaries of the majors can hardly even be argued as “tricking” audiences into […]

read more...

Kees van Dijkhuizen’s work is kinda great. While most fan edited montages of films you see online feel stilted and blandly cut together, Dijkhuizen’s don’t. Just watch the “this year in film” tribute videos he cut together for 2008 and 2009. They’re excellent. And for the past few months he’s been releasing love letters to some of the most praised directors working today. Dijkhuizen has covered David Fincher, Sofia Coppola, Danny Boyle, Wes Anderson, Baz Luhrmann, and now with his best one yet, Michel Gondry. They’re all worth a watch, especially since they’re all directors known first and foremost for their style. Side note: This video is also a nice reminder that The Green Hornet is better than it’s given credit for. I’ll take Gondry’s anti-superhero pic any day over Green Lantern and — yes, I’m going to say it – Thor.

read more...

Culture Warrior

Yesterday the Twittersphere (a place where topics are only discussed in rational proportions) was abuzz with the news that Terrence Malick’s long-awaited magnum opus Tree of Life was booed at its Cannes premiere. While the reaction to Malick’s latest will no doubt continue to be at least as divisive and polarized as his previous work has been, for many Malick fans the news of the boos only perpetuated more interest in the film, and for many Malick non-fans the boos signaled an affirmation of what they’ve long-seen as lacking in his work. (Just to clarify, there was also reported applause, counter-applause, and counter-booing at the screening.) Booing at Cannes has a long history, and can even be considered a tradition. It seems that every year some title is booed, and such a event often only creates more buzz around the film. There’s no formula for what happens to a booed film at Cannes: sometimes history proves that the booed film was ahead of its time, sometimes booing either precedes negative critical reactions that follow or reflect the film’s divisiveness during its commercial release. Booed films often win awards. If there is one aspect connecting almost all booed films at Cannes, it’s that the films are challenging. I mean challenging as a descriptor that gives no indication of quality (much like I consider the term “slow”), but films that receive boos at the festival challenge their audiences or the parameters of the medium in one way or another, for better or […]

read more...

Somewhere is the exact type of film you expect from Sofia Coppola. Thematically, it’s very similar to her other works. And its lead protagonist, Johnny Marco, is a celebrity. A celebrity (like Bob in Lost in Translation) that is empty and nearly invisible. There are a lot of people who can’t sympathize with those with success. It’s a cynical response, and Coppola doesn’t seem to understand it as well. There’s something saddening and universal about Johnny Marco that people without large bank accounts should be able to connect with. Most of Coppola’s leads are always lost and trying to find footing in their lives. Coppola explores similar themes quite frequently from isolation to empty success, and revisiting those themes and trying to keep it fresh is something the acclaimed director discussed below. Coppola was swift in her responses, but always to the point. Thankfully, I had plenty of time with her and found her to be quite pleasant and passionate.

read more...

So the news cycle has already moved on to chirping about The Hobbit (making it feel like January again) and about Steven Spielberg making a robot movie (making it feel like 2005 and 2001 again), but that won’t stop us from going all the way back to last week and continuing the conversation about Halo. With renewed efforts being made to bring it to the screen, the question continues to be who the best director would be for the job. We don’t know the answer to that, but we do know who would make the most interesting version of Master Chief blasting the slaughter dew right out of some alien hordes. That’s why we gathered together the bold (sometimes twisted) minds of the Rejects to answer the call and deliver a list of a few directors who would look outside the box to turn something incredibly commercial into something either brilliant or completely inaccessible. Without further ado, here’s the list:

read more...

Somewhere

Focus Features has unleashed the first trailer for Sofia Coppola’s upcoming film Somewhere, a drama about a bad boy actor (Stephen Dorff) who — while struggling to survive life at the Chateau Marmont — is forced to reconnect with his 11-year old daughter (Elle Fanning). There’s nothing like a rags-to-riches tale about privileged people with substance abuse problems and issues with taking responsibility for themselves. Am I right?

read more...

Three names emerge as Summit starts aiming at Oscar-caliber talent for the top job on its monster.

read more...
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Comic-Con 2014
Summer Box Office Prediction Challenge
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3