Snow White and the Huntsman

Chris Hemsworth is The Huntsman

Now let’s just hold our horses and keep away from the “who asked for this?!” talk, because you know who asked for a sequel to Rupert Sanders’ Snow White and the Huntsman? Every single person who paid to see the first film – $400M worth of ticket sales, worldwide – probably including you. It’s okay, we all have to learn from our mistakes, and perhaps now we’ll get a new revisionist fairy tale (heavy on the revisionism) that doesn’t feel so bizarrely dark and boring. Back in June, we learned that director Frank Darabont was indeed set to helm the newest film and, what, we’re sorry, Kristen Stewart, no, we don’t need you for this one, thanks though. Now we’re getting still more information, thanks to Deadline, including a release date for the film (April 22, 2016), the news that both Chris Hemsworth and Charlize Theron are indeed set to come back and that we’re calling this thing The Huntsman because why not. We also have a better idea of what we’re dealing with in terms of plot, though little of it should surprise us, considering the title of this thing, the news that it’s a prequel and its pair of returning stars. It’s about the Huntsman (Hemsworth) and Queen Ravenna (Theron). Sure. The film will reportedly focus on “how the fates of two characters — The Huntsman Eric and Ravenna — intersected before they met Snow White.” Hey, what a great idea—wait. Wait a second. We already know how their […]

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Chris Hemsworth is The Huntsman

Snow White and the Huntsman made a ton of money. And like most films that make a ton of money (say, a certain bot-morphing franchise with a new sequel this weekend), it’s mostly immune to criticism. No one cares about sagging reviews when your film just brought in the GDP of a small country. But there’s some kind of criticism that will sink your film-Titanic: a star that’s poison in the tabloids. It’s why Mel Gibson is just now crawling his way back into an Expendables role after all those racial slur incidents a few years back. And Snow White and the Huntsman is no stranger to this kind of low controversy. You may remember that in 2012 star Kristen Stewart and director Rupert Sanders were caught in a love affair, kindled by the fires of British actors digitally altered to look like dwarves. What you might not remember is the tangled mass of media reporting that followed immediately afterwards. First, the official reports claimed Stewart had been booted from the project, and the sequel would erase Snow White and go all Huntsman, all the time. Then Universal came out with a public denial: “Any reports that Kristen Stewart has been dropped are false.” A couple months later, Sanders was officially given the boot, while Stewart was kept on for part two. Stewart herself confirmed it. Those across the nation who saw this story unfold (from the tabloid headlines that stick out in line at the grocery store) could finally rest easy. Now […]

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Kristen Stewart Dead in Snow White and the Huntsman

Deciding not to direct Ant-Man is the big fad right now. Everybody’s doing it! But while Marvel continues to play the arcade claw game with strictly comedic directors, the dramatic ones are apparently being eyed elsewhere for another franchise. Universal needs a director for the 2016-slated sequel to Snow White and the Huntsman, a film that was met with a resounding “meh” back in 2012 (and then immediately blurred together with Alice in Wonderland and Jack the Giant Slayer in the minds of people who’ve seen too many recent dark and edgy live-action fairy tales). And so far, the studio is looking at three truly terrific choices, the names of which have been shared by Deadline. We weigh the benefits of each below. Frank Darabont The Shawshank Redemption. The Mist. The Walking Dead. Darabont is the master of slow-paced, suspenseful melancholy that takes a quick snack break for something horribly upsetting. Like how The Mist is a pleasant how-to guide on disaster relief and supermarket safety, and then — POW! – a guy explodes and a bunch of spiders come out. With his experience with The Walking Dead, he might be able to unearth something new (say, “emotion”) from the likes of star Kristen Stewart. Seriously, though, Darabont is a pretty masterful filmmaker when he wants to be, and he’s no stranger to monstrous horrors that appear out of nowhere to drag men to their doom. Which will almost certainly appear in the next Huntsman film. Overall, an extremely solid choice for Snow White and the Huntsman 2 Furious.

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IntroActorInjured

Like any workplace, injuries happen all the time on set – the only difference is that you don’t tend to burn your genitals while organizing a meeting or suffer major brain injury while carpooling for lunch, unless you suck at driving. On film sets, despite every precaution, these things seem a lot more organic. That said, it’s way more rare when an actor or actress willingly undergoes physical harm, either for the sake of the art or through sheer dedication to the role. I’m not talking about poor Tippi Hedren or Peter Lorre being forced to by their directors – no, these are actors who only had themselves to blame. For the sake of brevity I’ve also excluded crazy people who like to flip around, like Jackie Chan and Jet Li, from the list. They transcend a list like this, but there are plenty of other actors who gave their bodies to the craft in big ways

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Best Visual Effects

Best Visual Effects. Over the years, this award has been called a number of things. In 1928, it was given as the award for Best Engineering Effects to the World War I flying drama Wings. It has evolved in the years since, recognizing in equal measure effects that are practical and digital, but most of all that live on the line in-between reality and surreality on the silver screen. It’s the only award category to consistently recognize those pioneers of film who have dazzled audiences with the yet unseen, everything from Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey to George Lucas’ Star Wars. Perhaps you’ve heard of them. The core criteria for the award is that it’s given to the visual effects masters whose work most exemplifies artistry, skill and fidelity with which the visual illusions are achieved. Each of this year’s nominees has these elements. And each of this year’s nominees brings something unique to the table. We’ve got the year’s highest grossing, all-out superhero explosion; the return of Peter Jackson and his WETA wizards to Middle Earth; Ridley Scott’s return to the sci-fi genre; a classic tale with a digitally saturated twist; and of course, one arty epic that is as colorful a film as was printed on celluloid (or imprinted in ones-and-zeroes) this year. Still, it might be one of the most predictable categories that Oscar has to offer in his 85th edition. The nominees are below, with our pick for winner marked with red…

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ted_02037204

Once upon a time, the Oscar nominations were filled with titles unfamiliar to the regular Joe. Not unknown, necessarily, but at least not widely seen. But today, thanks to all kinds of home video platforms and theatrical distribution for even the short film nominees, it’s not always so impossible to see everything before the big night. To help those of you wishing to be completists, I’ve listed all of this year’s recently announced Oscar nominees and noted how and where you can see them, whether presently or soon enough. It may not be entirely doable, as some foreign films haven’t officially been released here, including one that doesn’t even yet have a date, and some titles are in the middle of their theatrical to DVD window. But there are a bunch that can be streamed right this moment on your computer via Amazon, Google, YouTube and other outlets, each of which I’ve marked accordingly courtesy of GoWatchIt. Only three are through Netflix Watch Instant, by the way (How to Survive a Plague, The Invisible War and Mirror Mirror). And one short has been embedded in the post. 

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Snow White and the Huntsman

Let’s get this straight right off the bat, the normally-reserved Kristen Stewart is pumped about returning for the sequel to Snow White and the Huntsman. After all sorts of back-and-forth chatter after the, ahem, scandal involving Ms. Stewart and the film’s director, Rupert Sanders, it’s finally been confirmed that Stewart will return for the new film (Sanders, however, will not). And Stewart is psyched about the new project – so psyched, in fact, that she can’t seem to hold her tongue or watch her language when it comes to the project. Stewart told ET (via ComingSoon), “Oh, it’s gonna be f***in’ amazing. No, I’m so excited about it, it’s crazy. I’m not allowed [to talk about it]. The other day I said that there was a strong possibility that we’re going to make a sequel, and that’s very true, but everyone was like, ‘Whoa, stop talking about it.’ So no, I’m totally not allowed to talk about it.” Whoa! When it comes to Stewart’s thoughts on if a sequel is justified, the actress (obviously? she wants the job, right?) said, “Oh my God. F***, yeah. Absolutely. And we’ve got a really amazing… [smiles] So, yeah. It’s all good. [laughs]” An amazing what? What is going on here? Whatever it is, at least the film’s leading lady is excited about the possibilities, though it’s still not clear who else will be returning, who is going to direct, and who has actually penned the final draft of the screenplay, so consider our […]

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Consider this major “with a grain of salt” news, particularly since it runs diametrically opposite to another rumor that hit the wire back in August. Radar Online reports (via Hollywood News) that despite an earlier report that Kristen Stewart would not be a part of the Snow White and the Huntsman sequel, while director Rupert Sanders would be returning (it’s important to note that Universal firmly rebuffed the news at the time), just the opposite has proven true. The outlet reports that “the actress has signed on to reprise her role in Snow White and the Huntsman, but director Rupert Sanders…won’t be a part of the project.” Strangely, when the first rumor was reported, it also held that the project was being reshaped as a more Huntsman-centric sequel, to the point that screenwriter David Koepp was out and set to be replaced by a new scribe. The Radar story continues on to claim that “the script has already been written and production will begin late next year.” Which sounds awesome and all, but who the heck wrote that script and who is going to step in to direct?

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“In a perfect world, ‘The Cabin in the Woods’ would be a lock for a Best Original Screenplay nomination.” – Joey Magidson, The Awards Circuit It must be frustrating to write for an awards blog (aka an Oscar blog, since the Academy Awards are always the main focus of these sites), and know that the best films of the year are not necessarily the ones that will be nominated. Magidson’s comment above, from his April review of The Cabin in the Woods, sort of sums that up. But at the same time I don’t know if the movie truly deserves the statement. Something to consider, semantically speaking, is that the Academy’s award is not for “Most Original Screenplay” but “Best Original Screenplay.” This isn’t to say that the script, by Joss Whedon and Drew Goddard, isn’t well-written, and you’re welcome to argue its case for a nomination. Is it the best-written original screenplay of the year, though? All my time as a movie lover and watcher of the Oscars, including the past few years of hate-watching, the original screenplay category is one I’ve constantly been excited about. It’s the place where you could find some of the more clever and creative efforts, including a number of films that might not get other nominations. You could find a good number of interesting foreign films outside of the foreign-language award ghetto (such as Bunuel‘s two nominations for writing), as well as an interesting showing of mainstream and blockbuster fare, especially in the […]

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Drinking Games

Oh, K-Stew! How could you do it to us? You have tarnished the good name of Snow White and the Huntsman with your predictable affair with director Rupert Sanders! If you caught yourself saying this a few weeks ago, you probably aren’t interested in a drinking game about this movie and should crawl back into your Twi-hole. (You’re probably too young to drink, anyway, so off you go.) But if the tabloid news surrounding this film made you somewhat curious to see it (or even revisit it since its release this past summer), you can use these rules to enhance the experience, now that the movie is available on DVD and Blu-ray.

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Welcome back to This Week In Discs! Lots of new releases hitting shelves today, but only two of them are worth buying! Which ones are they? Keep reading to find out along with the skinny on sixteen other titles including Andy Garcia’s epic For Greater Glory, Fox’s Terra Nova series, Greta Geriwg’s Lola Versus, the unfinished horrors of Munger Road and more. As always, if you see something you like, click on the image to buy it. The Loved Ones Months after a teenager (Xavier Samuel) loses his father in a car accident his efforts to put the past behind him are interrupted by madness. It seems Lola (Robin McLeavy), a quiet and unassuming classmate, has developed a crush on him and she won’t take no for an answer. What follows is a brutal, suspenseful and unpredictable thriller as he’s forced to find a strength he didn’t know he possessed if he wants to survive. This Australian thriller from writer/director Sean Byrne gets just about everything right including a wonderful cast, sharp editing and wonderfully twisted narrative. Good on Paramount for releasing it unrated, but they suck for the lack of Blu-ray. If you have a region-free Blu-ray player skip this edition and pick up the import Blu from AmazonUK instead. If not, buy this now and enjoy the hell out of it. [Extras: Interviews]

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UPDATED: Deadline Hollywood has issued a special message from Universal Co-Chairman Donna Langley: “We are extremely proud of Snow White And The Huntsman and we’re currently exploring all options to continue the franchise. Any reports that Kristen Stewart has been dropped are false.” Like any rumor, we’ll just have to wait and see if Stewart pops up in the SWATH sequel that may not even happen. Oh, Tinseltown. Well, this is awkward. THR reports that Kristen Stewart (you know, Snow White) has been dropped from the first Snow White and the Huntsman sequel (again, she played Snow White in the film), with Universal reportedly shelving its planned traditional sequel “and is instead focusing on a solo Huntsman movie starring Chris Hemsworth.” Not clear enough just yet? The outlet also reports that Stewart “will not be invited to return if the follow-up goes forward.” The sequel is now being “reconceived as a spinoff movie” for the Huntsman, something that had been hinted at months ago but seemed to have been put on the back burner. Further proof of that? Screenwriter David Koepp, who had been tasked with writing the film’s originally-planned sequel is now also out of a job, “as the project is being transformed into something other than the movie that Koepp had been hired to write.” Sources also tell THR that “the original plan…was to make two films featuring the Snow White character and a third film spinning off the Huntsman, similar to how Fox’s X-Men series has spun […]

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One of the biggest complaints people had coming out of Ridley Scott’s epic in scope sci-fi spectacle Prometheus was that it raised more questions than it answered. Well, today brings good news for those of you looking for closure. It turns out Scott knew what he was doing all along: he raised a bunch of questions about the origins of humanity, got us on the hook for wanting answers, and now he’s going to sell us all tickets to a sequel. Pretty clever, movie industry. Confirmation of a Prometheus 2 comes from THR, who have published a comprehensive look at which of the big movies from this summer are likely to spawn sequels. In addition to the Prometheus confirmation, they reveal that movies like Ted, Magic Mike, American Reunion, and Snow White and the Huntsman are all likely to be given follow-ups as well.

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Given his prominent roles in both The Avengers and Snow White and the Huntsman, which have been two of the biggest financial successes so far this summer, actor Chris Hemsworth finds himself being in the enviable position of looking like a box office commodity. Basically, he’s the anti-Taylor Kitsch (sorry Tim Riggins, but it’s true). Given all of this newfound star power and perceived money drawing ability, Hemsworth’s name is the perfect asset to be used to bring a once-shelved project back from the brink. Or, at least, that’s what producers Joe Roth, Paula Weinstein, Will Ward, and Palak Patel are hoping. They’ve just attached him to star in a film called In the Heart of the Sea, which was originally being developed by Intermedia back in 2000, and has been slipping in and out of developmental hell ever since. In the Heart of the Sea is an adaptation of a Nathaniel Philbrick book of the same name, which tells the true story of a whaling ship named the Essex that was stalked and destroyed by an evil, vindictive sperm whale back in 1820. If that story sounds a bit familiar (and shame on you if it doesn’t!), that’s because this is the same disaster that inspired Herman Melville’s literary classic, “Moby Dick.” The difference between this text and that is that Philbrick’s book is a much more fact-based account of the tragedy which stemmed from his reading of little-known documents chronicling the tragedy as well as a written account […]

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Despite somewhat middling reviews and critics and pundits everywhere asking “who the hell is this film for?,” Universal’s Snow White and the Huntsman has proven itself to be a force to be reckoned with (or at least looked at). The film has so far made nearly $120m in worldwide receipts in the last week and a half, and it opened to a surprising $56m first weekend in the U.S. alone. The studio set screenwriter David Koepp to pen a sequel back in April, but it’s still been a bit of a wait-and-see as to whether the studio would actually charge ahead with a new installment. Now Deadline Dark Forest reports that Universal is indeed plunging back into the thick of the gritty revisionist fairy tale, with the studio “making all the moves that indicate another chapter is in the offing, and on a fast track.” Koepp is still on the screenwriting beat, and Universal is reportedly interested in bringing back Rupert Sanders to direct (the film was the commercial director’s first feature). While Sanders has yet to commit, he’s apparently “interested” in the job, though he does have the same kind of optioned deal that would bring him back for another go – not like the actors from the film, who do (though Kristen Stewart and Chris Hemsworth are clearly part of that package, it’s unclear if Charlize Theron is).

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Channel Guide - Large

In 2010, after the release of the largely panned Cop Out, Kevin Smith tweeted a short but passionate polemic against movie critics (that most loathsome subsect of the human species who sit up in their ivory towers and pass judgments), writing, “From now on, any flick I’m ever involved with, I conduct screenings thusly: you wanna see it early to review it? Fine: pay like you would if you saw it next week. Like, why am I giving an arbitrary 500 people power over what I do at all, let alone for free [?] Why’s their opinion more valid?” In the interest of full disclosure, I have attended free press screenings, but I still think that Smith’s gripe had merit. Spoilers with Kevin Smith, a new Hulu original series that debuted on the site Monday, is the director’s attempt to fix the “backwards system” that perturbed him so. The web talk show’s mission? As Smith puts it on his blog, “we don’t review movies on Spoilers; we revere them.”

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For those of you who didn’t dig on Tarsem Singh‘s giddy Mirror Mirror, here is what you thought you wanted. Do not expect characters to be joking around or having a good time in Snow White and The Huntsman, as all that fun stuff is simply not cool and edgy enough for this grim universe. Mirror Mirror was for the sophisticated and playful child version of you, while talented commercial director Rupert Sanders‘ dark modern take is for that goth High School you, the person who prefers everything — even the kiddiest of things — to be dragged through an edgy, gritty filter. Dour Snow White and The Huntsman certainly is. In a fifteen minute cliff notes introduction, we’re quickly, and yet slowly, introduced to the reactionary Snow White (Kristen Stewart) as a child. We’re told she’s best friends with a boy named Will, who later pops up as a runner in the competition for most disposable character of the year. We’re told she’s famed for her beauty. We’re told her kingdom is dying. We’re told far too much, while hardly ever being shown. After the death of her sickly mother and the murder of her father she’s banished to a jail cell by the evil Queen: the bird heart-eating Ravenna (Charlize Theron).

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Reel Sex

It only takes five minutes to realize Snow White and the Huntsman is going to be a storytelling disaster, and then another ten minutes to accept that short of taking a nap or switching your ticket out for the next showing of What to Expect When You’re Expecting that you are stuck watching as the fairy tale of your childhood is ripped apart in the most unsettling of ways. Normally, the twisting of classic stories for new audiences thrills me to no end, and I have to admit regardless of how terrible the trailers looked, I couldn’t wait to see Huntsman. A world where Snow White rejects her meek personality by embracing battles and carnage sounded better than Christmas.

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If you weren’t a fan of the kiddie nature of Mirror Mirror, screenwriter Evan Daugherty has helped craft the film for you, in a near 10-year process. Daugherty began Snow White and the Hunstman as a pure labor of love. While fellow NYU students were most likely telling the same tales about a struggling artist, Daugherty began to write his epic and serious take on the tale of Snow White, with complete control and freedom, in his dorm room. What he ended up with is a dark and atmosphere-oriented take on the Snow White tale, thanks to the twisting and spinning of the staples of the story we all know. Snow White and The Hunstman, at times, even bridges on becoming a horror film, clearly showing this isn’t your grandfather’s Snow White. Here is what screenwriter Evan Daugherty had to say about the visual wonders and horrors of the Dark Forest, director Rupert Sanders‘s painterly approach, the power of simplicity, and the genesis of this very, very serious Snow White:

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Tron Uprising

What is Movie News After Dark? It doesn’t matter. Just go with it… We begin tonight with a very cool bit of concept art from Tron: Uprising, the new animated show that has spun off from the Tron: Legacy film and the rebirth of the Tron franchise in general. This feels like a much better idea than a sequel to Legacy, as this universe has always seemed built for animation anyway. To add to the buzz around the show, Gamma Squad has Six Reasons Why You Should Watch Tron: Uprising.

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