Sixteen Candles

Sixteen Candles

Happy birthday, Sixteen Candles, you’re really weird. Perhaps you’ve forgotten just how weird Sixteen Candles is, but rest assured, it’s weird. John Hughes’ directorial debut arrived in theaters on May 4, 1984 (Star Wars Day, as the Internet recognizes it), making it officially thirty-years-old today. At the time, Hughes had already penned Mr. Mom, National Lampoon’s Vacation and a bunch of episodes of Delta House, but Sixteen Candles marked his first foray behind the camera in a directorial capacity. The fact that the film is rarely referred to as a very, very weird little comedy is both a total shame and fairly understandable, if only because it’s much easier to forget the skewed nature of Hughes’ comedic sensibilities and instead focus on the important thing – it’s a teen romance starring Molly Ringwald – that defined a large section of Hughes’ career, for better or worse.

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Despite many naysayers, including myself, thinking that Abigail Breslin would be a flash in the pan after breaking out as a child actor in the indie dark comedy Little Miss Sunshine, the now teenage actress has maintained a steady course for her career and proved all the Negative Nancies wrong. As is always the case in situations like this, I couldn’t be happier to be made to look like a fool. Just before the release of her abandoned daughter drama Janie Jones, and fresh off the heels of signing onto a crime pic called The Class Project, Breslin has now agreed to also star in a new teen comedy called A Virgin Mary. Why is this newsworthy? Well in addition to having the talents of a now proven young actress in Abigail Breslin, A Virgin Mary is also a teen comedy that is being described as “a coming of age story in the tradition of Sixteen Candles.” I know that there are a lot of people out there who still have a strong love for the work of John Hughes, and Sixteen Candles in particular, so I view that as a refreshing way to hear a teen comedy touting itself in the current climate of glossy, shallow movies aimed toward teens. Let’s dig down there into the awkwardness of adolescence and wallow, not cast a bunch of beautiful twentysomethings in a movie that puts high school up on some sort of glamorous pedestal. The film has been scripted by Normal […]

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culturewarrior-johnhughes

For somebody associated with making some of the most resonant teen comedies in modern cinema history, John Hughes still doesn’t receive enough credit—mainly because, before John Hughes, there really was no such thing as the teen comedy.

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JohnHughesDead

The man who brought us everything from The Breakfast Club to Ferris Bueller to Home Alone died today at the age of 59. What’s your favorite Hughes film?

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80sfilmheader

Rejoice! It’s not all doom and gloom when it comes to remakes. There’s a ton of 80s movies that aren’t being remade, and here’s just a handful of the ones we’re most thankful for.

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geekgasm-60sbooksheader

Artist Mitch Ansara has created what could be called one the first geekgasm of 2009: 1960s-inspired paperback book covers of novelized movie adaptations. Okay, so it might not sound so cool at first, but you’ve got to check some of these covers out.

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published: 11.21.2014
D
published: 11.21.2014
B+
published: 11.19.2014
C+
published: 11.19.2014
B-, C


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