Seth Rogen

The-Interview-Skylark-Tonight-MTV-Special-Iggy-Azalea

Remember the movie Rubin and Ed? If not, maybe you at least remember when Crispin Glover appeared on Late Night with David Letterman in character as his role as Rubin. That was the time the actor nearly kicked the talk show host in the face. The problem there was partly that Letterman didn’t know what was going on. Also, neither Rubin and Ed nor Glover were familiar enough to warrant such a stunt or for that sort of promotion to work in their favor. Years later, Joaquin Phoenix drew comparisons to Glover when he appeared on Letterman’s Late Show acting strangely. It turned out he was also in character, albeit for a project then still in the works rather than as a promotional stunt. Well, actually it sort of worked as that, too, but either way it wasn’t helpful in wooing audiences to the movie involved, I’m Still Here. Both that and Rubin and Ed were box office failures. As was The Love Guru, which stars Mike Myers as a goofy spiritual guide. He tried to boost interest in the comedy by appearing on American Idol as the character, Maurice Pitka. Such a gimmick is also harmful to the integrity of the show that allows it — particularly if it’s a show that’s not interview or otherwise publicity based — but it can be especially damaging to the movie being promoted. Usually it’s a case of the stunt falling flat rather than the conception of the stunt itself, and the Pitka character was […]

read more...

Columbia Pictures

Looks like Seth Rogen and James Franco won’t be getting the Dennis Rodman Tour of Honor and Respect and Like, Just A Lot of Basketball should they ever happen to roll into North Korea, but we doubt that will come as a surprise to the comedic duo (and we also doubt that anyone will ever be able to just “roll” into the country, least of all a pair of Hollywood superstars known for their comedic hijinks). The pair’s next cinematic team-up, The Interview, takes pretty sharp aim at both the Asian dictatorship itself and its actual supreme leader, Kim Jong-un. This isn’t veiled stuff — Rogen and Evan Goldberg‘s latest film is entirely about a smarmy television host (Franco) and his best pal/producer (Rogen) who snag a big interview with the dictator and are then tasked with assassinating him, thanks to the demands of the U.S. government. Again, this isn’t a film about West Norea and its meanie leader Jim Long-um, it’s fully about North Korea and Kim Jong-un. So, yeah, he’s a little ticked off. But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t want to see the final film!

read more...

Seth Rogen Neighbors

Nicholas Stoller‘s Neighbors has already made $213m worldwide. That’s an impressive haul, especially considering it only cost $18m to make. That’s a low number for a studio comedy, and there’s a reason for that. If the film had cost more than that, Stoller and producers Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg, and James Weaver wouldn’t have been able to make the movie they wanted to make. They had the opportunity to make Neighbors for $36m, but none of them wanted to see the watered down version. “With Neighbors we kind of stopped,” Rogen said recently at the Produced By Conference. “We played the studio game getting all the notes we were getting. We were waiting for a call one day that was suppose to be the call that we’re making the movie, but instead it was a call with more notes. We had a very real moment and asked, ‘Is this what we want to be doing? Is this the process we want to continue on?’” The answer was a resounding no.

read more...

Seth Rogen Produced By Conference

This post is in partnership with Cadillac  Cadillac and the Producers Guild of America recently launched Make Your Mark, a short film competition that challenges producers to create compelling content with limited resources. Contestants will make a short film over a single weekend in late June, and the 30-second Cadillac spot featuring the grand prize winner’s film will air during the 2015 Academy Awards. We caught up with Seth Rogen at the PGA-sponsored Produced By Conference on the Warners lot where he, Evan Goldberg and James Weaver were offering advice that might be useful for aspiring filmmakers planning to enter.

read more...

Columbia Pictures

What better way is there to usher in a nuclear holocaust than with Seth Rogen talking about poop? Because Rogen and James Franco have apparently decided that making a movie about a fictional apocalypse was kid stuff. With their newest film, The Interview, they’re basically goading America’s enemies into starting World War Three. A bad idea? Yeah, probably. Will it be funny? Yeah, probably. So hold your loved ones close and prepare for a fart, a chuckle and then the abrupt fiery destruction of all mankind. Franco plays Dave Skylark, an extremely popular and extremely shallow talk show host, with Rogen as his steadfast producer. They discover that Kim Jong-un is, for whatever reason, a fan of their show, and manage to secure an interview with the big man around Pyongyang. But right before they can head out for a little Dennis Rodman-style diplomacy, they get a few visitors from the CIA. Who say, in so many words, “Hey dudes, love the interview idea. Oh, while you’re there, could you be a sport and murder Kim for us? Thanks!” Take a look at the fallout with the first trailer of The Interview below.

read more...

The 40 Year Old Virgin

“How many men, raised on a steady diet of Judd Apatow comedies in which the shlubby arrested adolescent always gets the girl, find that those happy endings constantly elude them and conclude, ‘It’s not fair’?” — Ann Hornaday “You know what? I respect women! I love women! I respect them so much that I completely stay away from them!” — Andy Stitzer, The 40-Year-Old Virgin 2005 wasn’t a terrible year to have a comedy in theaters. Wedding Crashers, Hitch and The 40-Year-Old Virgin all finished the year with record numbers, regardless of genre. Of the three, Virgin was the most shocking surprise. For Universal Studios. For Hollywood. At the time, Steve Carell (The Office had only been out for half a year to underwhelming ratings), Catherine Keener and the rest of the cast were seen as character actors and indie drama mainstays, not movie star leads. At the center of the low-budget film was Judd Apatow. A co-creator and producer of Freaks and Geeks, Apatow’s personal voice and vision in the world of cinema was not just unique, but refreshing to audiences and talent alike. Unlike Hitch or Wedding Crashers, Virgin didn’t attempt to hand in the classic story of Misogynistic Handsome Man Turns Reformed Gentleman. Instead it spun the comedic formula that studios had profited on since Some Like It Hot. Apatow focused on a man who was anything but misogynistic. A spinster who felt more at home with his still-in-the-box toy collection, Carrel’s Andy Stitzer was pure in a world where […]

read more...

Neighbors 10

There’s a great jab at Kevin James movies in Neighbors. Seth Rogen‘s character is arguing with his wife, played by Rose Byrne, because he thinks she needs to be the responsible part of their marriage, and he cites the actor’s work comparatively. He’s watched too many movies and TV shows, apparently, in which an idiot male needs to be reigned in by his more rational female partner, and he thinks that’s reality. I’m sure a lot of husbands out there will identify. But Byrne’s character wants to have fun and be a little immature, too. She can be just as foul-mouthed and get just as down and dirty as the boys, and man does she. This break from expectations is one of the reasons Neighbors succeeds as a great work of comedy. It aims to be more realistic and relatable than your average dumb gross-out movie. In particular, there is one recent comedy starring James that relates very much to Neighbors: Grown Ups 2. I didn’t include it on my list of movies to watch after seeing the newer movie, because I don’t want to recommend it (I got enough flack for giving it a non-negative review last year), but it’s probably the movie I thought about most while watching Rogen and Byrne battle a fraternity led by Zac Efron and Dave Franco. Both movies deal with adults in arrested development clashing with young attractive college students. Either one could go by the original title of Neighbors, which was “Townies.” But only one […]

read more...

Neighbors Movie

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

read more...

Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon in The Trip

The best thing about the new comedy Neighbors (as opposed to the old comedies with the same name) is that it’s two movies in one. You’ve got your movie about adults dealing with growing older and having a baby and how the new frat house next door is challenging both their maturity and their patience, and then you’ve got your basic college comedy in which a hotshot frat boy is dealing with his brothers, particularly his best friend, maturing and moving on near the end of their senior year. The latter might seem more derivative, but as one part of the Neighbors whole it works really well. Of course, I still can’t help but focus on those predecessors. Fortunately most frat comedies are terrible and I won’t recommend them. But the obvious best has to be recognized, just in case there are youngsters going to see Seth Rogen and Zac Efron battle it out without having seen the necessary classics. As for the other storyline, it mostly just reminded me of the canceled NBC sitcom Up All Night. The following is a list of strictly movies that I thought of during Neighbors, some because of similar plot tropes and others because of talent involved. I think all of them are worth being familiar with if you’re going to now be familiar with this new movie. As usual, this week’s Movies to Watch list could involve spoilers for the new release, here Neighbors, so only venture forth if you’ve seen it or don’t care.

read more...

Zac Efron and Seth Rogen in NEIGHBORS

Editor’s note: Our review of Neighbors originally ran during this year’s SXSW film festival, but we’re re-running it now as the film opens in theaters. You might expect an R-rated comedy starring Seth Rogen and Zac Efron, directed by the guy who made Forgetting Sarah Marshall and The Five-Year Engagement, to be loose and sloppy, like Rogen’s torso. But Neighbors turns out to be tight and lean and eminently watchable, like Efron’s torso. It’s boisterously funny, yet also focused and perceptive. Who knew a Rogen movie could be all of those things at once? Rogen and the suddenly indispensable Rose Byrne play Mac and Kelly, new parents working through the mixed emotions of loving their adorable baby girl while missing their old, fun lives. After a few lukewarm gags along the usual lines (they want to go to a late-night party but fall asleep instead!), we get to the crux of the matter as a fraternity moves in to the house next door. Under the guidance of dude-bros Teddy (Efron) and Pete (Dave Franco), the frat behaves exactly the way Mac and Kelly were afraid they would, with raucous nightly parties. (For some reason they’re the only neighbors bothered by the noise.) The new situation intensifies Mac and Kelly’s insecurity about becoming grown-ups. They want to be cool, and even more than that, they want to be cool in the eyes of hot college kids (Mac unhesitatingly calls Teddy “the sexiest man I’ve ever seen”). With a joint as a peace […]

read more...

Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun Li

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

read more...

Seth Rogen in Superbad

Way back in the dark ages of 2012, Paramount snatched up a little untitled comedy pitch from a guy named Rodney Rothman. A little comedy pitch … with Seth Rogen and Kevin Hart attached to star and Rogen and Evan Goldberg attached to produced. So, more like a really, really huge pitch, I guess. Oh, also Rothman did a bunch of work on Undeclared and executive produced Forgetting Sarah Marshall, which is probably worth something. Well, the dark ages are over, and now word has gotten out about this untitled pitch (now a mostly-titled screenplay), from the guy who’s planning on directing it: Nicholas Stoller. Him, you might remember from the time he directed Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Get Him to the Greek and The Five-Year Engagement, as well as from when he shared writing duties on the last two Muppets movies. Also, his Neighbors is poised to hit in a big way this summer –so he’s got that going for him, which is nice. Now Stoller is taking to the streets (the streets of the Internet, anyway) to pump up this film that he might be directing but hasn’t yet signed on to. First, he went to Slashfilm, where he reaffirmed what the movie was about: the first (fictional) time a black and white cop were partnered up. And he mentioned that this new picture’s got marijuana and hip jazz music and that he really, really wants to direct it. Also, he mentioned that it’s “kind of a Baz Luhrman world mixed with Tarantino […]

read more...

Neighbors

Wholesomeness does not last forever, especially the kind seemingly cooked up in a Disney or Nickelodeon lab somewhere. Plenty of child stars – squeaky clean in their tween years – have fallen from grace in some way or another. Naked pictures! Rehab! Drugs! (Maybe that last one before rehab! Maybe also after, though!) Indie movies! It’s a rough world out there, and it’s hard to stay on the straight and narrow (or the at least overly family-friendly) path for too long. Such is the case with young Zac Efron. The three-time star of the Disney Channel’s hugely popular High School Musical series (a gem of modern kiddie fare, and don’t you ever forget it) has had some, well, troubles. There’s been some drugs. Some rehab. Some getting peed on by Nicole Kidman on screen. There’s been some oat-sowing, okay? But although Efron has made some missteps and mistakes in both his personal and professional lives, but it looks like he might have finally found a way to marry his panache for the bad boy stuff with something that might actually make some damn money. It’s called Neighbors, and you’re not going to be able escape it this time next month. 

read more...

Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg

There are certain rivalries that never die, no matter how much time has passed, no matter what has happened in the world. Coke vs. Pepsi. Rocky Balboa vs. Ivan Drago. The Harlem Globetrotters vs. The Washington Generals. And then there’s the battle that raged on in the early 1990s, still lasting until this day, between the people who loved their SEGA gaming systems, and the people sitting firmly in camp Nintendo. Best bros and collaborators Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg have recognized the significance of this era of gaming and are taking Console Wars to the big screen, a film that chronicles the deep, dark war between the established company with beloved franchises (Nintendo) and the scrappy arcade folks with big dreams and creative characters — SEGA, who re-entered the scene with the SEGA Mega Drive.

read more...

Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Seth Rogen in

Do people still buzz about things, or is that a term from the 90s that’s just serving to show my age? You know, bees buzz, and if you get a bunch of people talking about something they start to sound like bees, so something that gets people talking has buzz? Anyway, someone who deserves a heck of a lot more buzz than he’s getting at this point in his career is Jonathan Levine. He’s the sort of filmmaker who’s done nothing but good work so far, who seems to improve as a filmmaker with every movie he makes, but who still hasn’t managed to get to that next level where cinephiles all know his name and you can sell a project just by saying that he made it. Given his track record to this point, that seems more like a failure of the people who have been marketing his movies than a failure of his work, because his stuff is not only really good, it’s all had a certain element of mainstream appeal. You’d think that if more people saw his films, or at least were better made aware that the same guy has done all of his stuff, then his name would become a commodity pretty quickly.

read more...

schlosswitz

While the first script that Jon Hurwitz and Hayden Schlossberg wrote together, Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle, had what it took to not only get produced, but also become a stoner comedy smash hit and the start of a film franchise, their subsequent work together has seen a law of diminishing returns as far as the laugh factor is concerned. After the first Harold & Kumar they were tapped to both write and direct a sequel, Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay, write and produce a trilogy-capper A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas, and write and direct the most recent entry in the American Pie abomination, American Reunion. Other than with the obvious exception of Waffle Bot in A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas, these movies have arguably been void of any funny jokes, and were certainly nowhere near as funny as the first Harold & Kumar movie, so what’s it going to take to get some more chuckles out of two guys who have shown they can produce them in the past? Maybe getting them out of the soul-sucking routine of producing studio sequels will do the trick. Or, at least, that’s what producers Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg seem to be hoping, because Deadline is reporting that they’ve just hired them to direct a currently untitled teen sex comedy that used to called Cherries.

read more...

caplan

Over the past decade or so Lizzy Caplan has built a pretty respectable career for herself being one of the go-to names you call if you need someone who’s both a pretty face and a sharp tongue for a big screen comedy. If you look over the girl’s filmography, she’s just constantly working. It’s looking like things could be getting even better for her as far as the acting game is concerned though, because not only is she currently starring in one of the fall’s hot new television dramas, Masters of Sex, which is creating quite a bit of critical buzz, but THR is reporting that she’s also just been recruited to be the female lead in the sure to be big next comedy from co-directors Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg (This Is the End), The Interview. What is The Interview? An absolutely insane-sounding movie about a smarmy talk show host and his television producer sidekick who somehow get wrapped up in a plot to assassinate the prime minister of North Korea. That’s what.

read more...

Actors Evan Goldberg and Seth Rogen

For whatever reason, comedy writing duo Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg (Superbad, This is the End) have long felt inspired by the plight of sausages. It was over two years ago that we first heard they were interested in writing an animated movie about an anthropomorphized sausage who gets lost in the supermarket and needs to find his way back to his aisle before the Fourth of July, and in that time it would seem that not only have they not moved on to other projects that sound less ridiculous, but they’ve actually been hard at work making this sausage movie happen. Maybe they just like food? Regardless of their motivations, it was announced in a press release today [via /Film] that Rogen and Goldberg’s sausage movie is officially going to be called Sausage Party, and it’s going to be made by Sony Pictures Entertainment and Annapurna Pictures. In addition to working together on the script, the duo will also be serving as producers on this “raunchy animated movie about one sausage’s quest to discover the truth about his existence.”

read more...

Neighbors

“Welcome to the darkness, bitches.” Imagine you’re a young professional enjoying life in your picturesque neighborhood with your happy little family. Life’s good – you’re not terribly unhip yet, you’ve got a smoking hot wife, and a newborn baby. But things get upended when the new neighbors you’ve been so anxious to meet and probably make be your news best friends turn out to be the world’s rowdiest fraternity, as is the case in Neighbors (formerly known as Townies), the comedy from Nicholas Stoller (Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Get Him to the Greek, The Muppets) about ruining Seth Rogen‘s suburban dreams. Now, if you’re Rogen and wife Rose Byrne, you’re going to do the yuppie thing, which is politely reason with frat leader Zac Efron to stop. And when that doesn’t work, you’re going to start fighting back against all the public sex, raucous parties, literal cannonballs and debauchery with your own shenanigans. Check out the NSFW trailer for yourself:

read more...

the-blues-brothers

Movies that are able to effectively blend action and comedy tend to be real crowd pleasers. Large segments of the moviegoing public go to the cinema specifically to escape, and, really, what’s more escapist than laughing and being thrilled at the same time? From The General to Big Trouble in Little China to Shaun of the Dead, the best action comedies tend to become cult favorites that stand the test of time and get re-watched constantly. There’s one action comedy that has a giant cult following I’ve never found an inroad to appreciate though—John Landis’ 1980 hit, The Blues Brothers. It’s not hard to see why many find it memorable. It’s set in an exaggerated version of lower class Chicago that’s easy to romanticize, it gets to ride the coattails of John Belushi’s gone-too-soon legacy, and it features so many legendary musicians that you almost feel like you have to respect it by proxy. Putting all that aside though, the movie is really long and slow, it doesn’t contain many big laughs, and quite frankly I have a hard time finishing it without falling asleep. One recent action comedy that doesn’t get any respect is 2011’s The Green Hornet, and seeing as its writers, Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, released the impressive and seemingly well-liked This is the End over the weekend, it feels like an appropriate time to revisit it and ask why that is. The Green Hornet made a decent amount of coin, and was successful enough on […]

read more...
NEXT PAGE  
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3