Rutger Hauer

dracula

The newest cinematic take on Bram Stoker’s tale of the cursed, blood-sucking Count Dracula—which seems to be capitalizing on the fact that it was directed and co-written by legendary horror filmmaker Dario Argento by officially calling itself Argento’s Dracula 3D—is all ready to get a simultaneous VOD and limited theatrical release on October 4, so it’s put out a new trailer on Apple’s site to get everybody ready for the occasion. In addition to having the old Italian guy who freaked everyone out with visually inventive horror like Suspiria’s name plastered all over it, the new trailer for Dracula 3D is also worth giving a look to because it takes vampires back to their gothic, creepy roots, where many fans of monster movies feel they never should have left. There isn’t any kung-fu or leather pants in this movie, and there certainly isn’t any sparkling skin or relationship drama. Instead, Dracula 3D puts its focus squarely on sex, blood, old-timey costumes, obvious sets, and genre legend Rutger Hauer driving stakes through people’s hearts as everyone’s favorite vampire hunter, Abraham Van Helsing. Watching it almost feels like stepping back in time.

read more...

IL FUTURO

If you’re attending Sundance this year and have already started thinking, “man, I would really love to see a dramatic feature that stars Rutger Hauer as an aging and blind B-movie star who is also a hermit and who was also Mr. Universe and who also lives in a rococo mansion in Rome,” then we have got the only film you’ll need to see at this month’s film festival. Based on Roberto Bolano‘s novel “Una Novelita Lumpen,” Alicia Scherson‘s Il Futuro stars Hauer as, well, an aging and blind B-movie star who is also a hermit and who was also Mr. Universe and who also lives in a rococo mansion in Rome – but wait! there’s also romantic intrigue here! Co-starring Manuela Martelli as a recently-orphaned adolescent who is tricked by her dirtbag friends into seducing Hauer’s Maciste, the film centers on the unexpected relationship that blossoms between the pair. The film will have its World Premiere later this month at Sundance and, as such, has rolled out that lovely new poster above, which we are pleased to premiere here on FSR. The future is now! And, also, retroactively back then!

read more...

Drinking Games

This coming weekend marks the 30th anniversary of the release of Ridley Scott’s visionary science fiction film Blade Runner. We are only seven short years from the predicted dystopia of 2019, and while we don’t have cool flying cars or synthetic snakes yet (let alone replicant love slaves), we can still hope for the future. Whether you prefer the studio’s “Director’s Cut,” the Ridley Scott-approved “Final Cut,” or the less adored theatrical cut from the summer of 1982, you can enjoy it fresh with this drinking game. Buffer your stomach with some noodles from an Asian street vendor or drink the liquor straight from the bottle as Rick Decker does (though you probably won’t last through 20 minutes of the film if you choose to do it that way). Also, gird your loins for the rumored Blade Runner sequel in the future because you’ll need some strength and copious amounts of alcohol to deal with the aftermath of that film.

read more...

Sitting in a theater watching a fair few people walk out in protest at the poor quality of Dracula 3D, you have to wonder whether they knew anything about horror legend Dario Argento, and if so what exactly they expected from the director whose name alone guarantees an audience. Because Argento has a certain set of skills, which aren’t necessarily reconcilable with what is great about film these days, but to give due credit, he hasn’t really deviated from the same tracks for decades, and the result is generally an entertaining affair all the same. This time out he’s taken the iconic Dracula story on, giving horror’s most famous character (played here by Thomas Kretschmann) his first 3D treatment, and adding a few other brand new touches to the iconic story of how the Count tricked Jonathan Harker (Unax Ugalde) into working for him in order to take his wife Mina (Marta Gastini) for his own. Along the familiar path we meet jealous and mostly naked vampire Tanja (Miriam Giovanelli), the infamous Dracula servant Renfield (Giovanni Franzoni), and the various pawns in the game, both victims and servants of the Dark Lord, with the prominent role of Lucy going to the director’s daughter Asia Argento. And of course, in the final third we are invited to enjoy the many pleasures of Rutger Hauer as Abraham Van Helsing.

read more...

Polish filmmaker Lech Majewski’s new English language film The Mill and the Cross is a fascinating exercise in form and artistic experimentation. The film itself is a project brought forth by a dialogue between various art forms. It’s based on Michael Francis Gibson’s book of the same name and focuses on the lives of the many characters depicted in Flemish Renaissance painter Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s famous work The Way to Calvary (1564), a painting that features literally hundreds of individuals and a crucifixion allegory to boot. It seems almost natural that such a film would arise from the meeting of artistic minds across centuries, using a relatively new art form to give temporality and space to another. And Majewski’s film, like any considerable work of visual art, has striking visuals and composition, not so much enlivening the everyday tasks of the characters in this painting with “realism” but depicting it through the opportunities of artistic representation. Thus, The Mill and the Cross is a fully aware and intentionally engaged with artifice and its process. Why then, is its very artificiality so off-putting?

read more...

After seeing Rutger Hauer in Hobo With a Shotgun, there’s no doubt that he’ll be a complete badass as Van Helsing for Dracula 3D. After all, Van Helsing is effectively a drifter with a 19th century shotgun. How will he stack up against Peter Cushing, Christopher Plummer and, gulp, Hugh Jackman? There’s no telling, but with horror icon Dario Argento at the helm, the movie will at least promise to be absurd and full of the red stuff. These first shots from the film show off just a little blood, a lot of Hauer, and more proof that Argento is unafraid to make a maiden go bottomless in a barn. Here are 6 of the many, many images over at the film’s official website.

read more...

To do a B-movie right, to straddle without crossing the precarious line between hilarity and stupidity, is no small feat. Jason Eisener achieves it with Hobo with a Shotgun, which reaches heights of comic literal-mindedness that the comparatively mild Snakes on a Plane could not. This is, yes, a movie about a hobo with a shotgun, but it’s also an inspired parody of the post-apocalyptic whack-a-mole revenge flick, a film with stronger than expected acting and an ideal dose of energized mania. The immortal Rutger Hauer stars as the titular hobo, who rides the rails into a lawless town populated by seething, ranting maniacs of all stripes. The debauchery is too much to handle – the hobo’s first day in, he’s greeted by a man filming bum fights and an extended set piece in which resident super villain The Drake (Brian Downey) beheads his brother in full view of the public, after which his scantily clad mistress gyrates and devours the fountain of blood. The baddie and his sons (Nick Bateman and Gregory Smith), nightmarish versions of ’80s Tom Cruise, exert a stranglehold over this decaying, crime-ridden megalopolis, where plumes of smoke pour over the streets and gritty, yellowed industrial building mix with seedy punk-populated arcades.

read more...

The first teaser trailer for Hobo With a Shotgun (that wasn’t the first trailer that the movie was based on), featured a lot of the candy-colored ultra violence that the kids crave these days. Basically, it was awesome. This trailer is awesome in an altogether different way – the way that sees Rutger Hauer soliloquizing in front of a room full of newborns, telling them they’ll grow up to be prostitutes, pimps and pushers. It’s dramatic, deep, and it leads into just a glimpse of the insanity that follows.

read more...

Hobo with a Shotgun is a gritty, nasty, depraved movie that no parent should let their child watch…and I loved every goddamn minute of it. It’s rare that we film journos are given the opportunity to be reduced to slimy, foul-mouthed 12-year-olds within the safe confines of a movie theater, but I’ll be a tiny little bastard if this film didn’t turn me into…a tiny little bastard. Its brazen conceit and relentless insanity touched upon all the things that pint-sized Brian loved about watching movies. But, as Attack the Block taught us, it’s not simply enough to compile the various pieces of genre films in a room together and expect them to play nice. And while Hobo with a Shotgun isn’t aiming for the same socially relevant subtext and deeper meaning of Attack the Block, within the rules it establishes from the onset, it shoots for the same high score in excellence. Scratch the surface of Hobo with a Shotgun, divorce yourself from the wickedly indecent content, and you will find a damn fine film that excels on almost every technical and artistic level. I am incredibly impressed with Jason Eisener as a director. There is a certain expectation with which one enters a film knowing that it began life as a trailer created to win a contest. But Eisener goes to such great lengths to tell his story in a way that is both stylishly entertaining and visually interesting that it’s hard not to be taken in by it. […]

read more...

Do you even need to read the rest of this post to get more excited? As we all know, Dario Argento is prepping Dracula 3D to shoot this Spring, and according to Twitch (via Italian media), Rutger Hauer will be moving on from playing a Hobo wielding a two-barreled firearm to Van Helsing – the iconic vampire killer. Hopefully a two-barreled crossbow will be involved. This is just one more step in Hauer’s Rourke-like return to prominence. Although he didn’t land hard with an Oscar nomination, he’s in his Sin City phase (which oddly enough didn’t come when he was in Sin City). He’s got five total films set to come out this year, a few more indies on the docket, and if he can land a high profile dramatic gig, we could see him acting crazy on an awards dais as early as 2012. Hope spring eternal. The idea of Hauer as Van Helsing is inspired. He’s grizzled yet refined in that way only European actors can manage. He also does wonderful, unspeakable things in Hobo With a Shotgun, so the violence he could perpetrate against those damned bloodsuckers might almost make up for Dracula III: The Legacy. Where, of course, he was on the other end of the stake.

read more...

The first trailer for Hobo With a Shotgun was, of course, technically a fake trailer. With the first trailer that actually corresponds to a movie coming out, it looks like director Jason Eisener wanted us to see the deeply human side of the hobo. This is perfect for Rutger Hauer, the unnerving master of all things uncomfortable. The look that he gives in this is the human equivalent of chugging a big gulp of curdled milk. Just for fun, we’re putting the trailers up side by side for a comparison. Both battle for bloody supremacy, but only one of them is doing it for the kids.* *Trailers not suitable for children.

read more...

It hasn’t even been a week since we reported that Rutger Hauer was going to star in Jason Eisener’s Hobo with a Shotgun. We’ve already got some teaser footage from the Nova Scotia set.

read more...

It is always wonderful to see an enterprising filmmaker go from shorts to feature films, especially if their shorts are among the best of what we’ve seen in recent years. Such is the case with Canadian filmmaker Jason Eisener, whose shorts Hobo with a Shotgun.

read more...

Goal II: Living the Dream

You may remember a little soccer movie called ‘Goal’ from 2005. It made a big splash, and now it is getting a sequel. And we’ve got some exclusive new images from said sequel.

read more...
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Comic-Con 2014
Summer Box Office Prediction Challenge
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3