Roman Coppola

Jason Schwartzman

Actor/writer/musician Jason Schwartzman and Roman Coppola get along well, at least that was the obvious impression I got from Schwartzman at the A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III‘s press day. They’ve collaborated many times in the past, which seems to be a collaboration that Schwartzman is completely gung ho for. For Schwartzman, the more (good) cooks in the kitchen, the better. Since A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III deals with an artistic roadblock – and as did the last movie Coppola directed, CQ – it felt like the right opportunity to discuss Schwartzman’s own creative process. Here’s what one of the many stars of Charles Swan had to say about his collaborative nature, why fancy notebooks won’t help you, and problem solving:

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February Must Sees

This February isn’t such a hot month for movie-going. When it comes to genuine “must-sees,” there are only two movies on this list which earn that title, and they’re the expected picks. January could have been worse, but this February won’t do 2013 any favors, unless the fifth Die Hard movie ends up blowing everyone’s socks off, and since it’s from the director of Max Payne, how could it not? In short, this year isn’t off to a good start. We got spoiled with last December, as we usually do, so hopefully we see something genuinely great soon, unless you thought Mama overcame a lackluster script, that Movie 43 wasn’t the Antichrist sent from Satan himself, and if you even remember that movie with Mark Wahlberg and Russell Crowe. The Last Stand isn’t included, because no more than five people saw it. Hopefully a few of you go out to see these movies and have a fun time, though:

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Charles Swan

Almost exactly two years ago, Charlie Sheen started a highly public meltdown that translated his acting fame into the kind of ravenous notoriety that’s an inch wide and a mile deep. Over a few months time, a celebrated film and television actor devolved into a reality star. We watched it in real-time, and even when the train had already wrecked, Sheen seemed impervious to the truth of what he’d done to his image. For those who didn’t tire of the schtick by his Comedy Central Roast in September of 2011, and for those who are thirsty for some severely watered down tiger blood, Sheen stars in Roman Coppola‘s A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III as a boring version of himself. In it, his character is a delusional ladies man who exhaustingly relives the break-up with his latest love Ivana (Katheryn Winnick) after a car accident sends him to the hospital with the sympathies of best friend Kirby Star (Jason Schwartzman), sister Izzy (Patricia Arquette) and accountant Saul (Bill Murray). His only other companion is his brain, a terrible thing that sends him into fantasy after fantasy. Anything to avoid what’s really going on.

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Moonrise Kingdom Interactive Script

The team behind Moonrise Kingdom has done something that should be done for all major scripts: an interactive version that features maps, images from the movie, set photos, and early sketches. The work from Wes Anderson and Roman Coppola is currently being celebrated by the Academy Awards, but fans of the film should devour this regardless of whether the screenplay wins gold. So don’t be a traitor to your family. Go sift through and marvel at this beautiful edition of the Moonrise Kingdom script. What other screenplays would you want to see given this treatment?

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Charles Swan III

The trailer for Roman Coppola‘s Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III is manic, but the star isn’t. In fact, Charlie Sheen is downright soporific in this thing, sleepwalking his way through ill-fitting costumes and outrageous situations that he only seems tangentially aware of. Basically, it looks like he may have done the entire movie on Oxycontin. It’s a colorful first look to be sure, but it’s a little troubling when Jason Schwartzman looks hung out to dry with no comedic partner to keep pace, but Bill Murray, fortunately, looks like he’s in rare form (especially when dressed as The Duke). Check it out for yourself, and be ready to think “Wes Anderson-Lite”:

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A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan the III

A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III is Roman Coppola‘s first film in over ten years. His directorial debut, CQ, was received with a mixed response. It didn’t garner much love, but it’s a really fun movie which goes beyond the average “struggling director” stories. Since then, Coppola’s been keeping busy with his music video and commercial and his frequent collaborations with Wes Anderson. Now he’s finally returned to the director’s chair, with a movie which is exactly what we’d expect from the guy who co-wrote Moonrise Kingdom and The Darjeeling Limited. Apple launched the trailer today. Take a look:

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Charles Swan Charlie Sheen

After more than a decade, Roman Coppola has a second directorial effort hitting theaters, and A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III has a lot going for it. It also has a giant question mark lodged in its center: its star. It was thinly veiled stunt casting at the time, and that could have paid off, but even the morbid curiosity has fallen off of Charlie  Sheen – a man stuck in time between has-been TV star and triumphant comeback artist. The complicated version is that not enough time has passed to legitimize a comeback, and the simple version is that very few people give a good goddamn about Sheen after he jumped energetically off the deep end of the abyss and the tabloid shine wore off. Still, the positives of the movie read like a Wes Anderson side project. Coppola has, of course, worked with that yellow-loving director, and recently co-wrote Moonrise Kingdom, so it’s not hard to imagine that everything from the title of his sophomore project to the Bill Murray and Jason Schwartzman-infused cast has a bit of Anderson flair to it. In that same vein, the marketing team has crafted a few symbol-centric posters that speak more to creating a stir than lazily photoshopping celebrity faces. Check them out for yourself, and enjoy the power of seeing Sheen’s name next to an unpeeled banana:

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Four Stories Filmmaking Competition

You’ve only got 7 more days to enter the Four Stories Filmmaking Competition, which means you’ve either got to hustle or you’re still polishing and perfecting. Either way, we’ve decided to help out with a few free pieces of advice that might come in handy. The contest – sponsored by W Hotels, Intel, The Directors Bureau and Roman Coppola – is unique in that its prompt involves two strict rules about where the story must be set (inside a W Hotel) and what has to be at the heart of the story (an Ultrabook laptop). Think of it as a grown-up version of creative writing class where the chance to have your script made by a Coppola is at stake along with two cool trips and a bit of spending money. I don’t remember my creative writing teacher ever being able to offer that (sorry, Mr. Boyd!). So if everyone is shackled by these challenges, how do you stand out? The creativity is up to you, but hopefully these 4 tips will get you that extra push you need for that 20th revision to really sing.

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Four Stories Filmmaking Competition

There’s no denying the simple romanticism of a hotel room. You’ve escaped your normal life for the turn-key reality of a temporary space where you don’t have to clean up after yourself, and there’s a mint waiting on your pillow when you return from the pool. These magic places have been the epicenter of creation (ask Ernest Hemingway or Barton Fink) and they’ve been the subject of storytelling (from the blissful views at the Overlook Hotel to Lost in Translation‘s palatial oasis in Tokyo). Why are they so inspirational? Because they’re fictional living spaces where the story hasn’t been written yet. With each new swipe of a key, the slate is wiped clean, ready for new words and ideas. And most of them have wi-fi, so you can write those words and ideas down. With that in mind, W Hotels and Intel are partnering with Roman Coppola and The Directors Bureau to launch a short film competition called Four Stories.

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Director Wes Anderon’s period dramedy, Moonrise Kingdom, is a unique departure from his previous collaboration with co-writer Roman Coppola. The Darjeeling Limited was about three characters who, at first, could not care less about one another, and often went about showing it in hilariously cruel ways. None of that meanness is present in Anderson and Coppola’s Moonrise Kingdom, a story about the innocence of young love. For certain characters, not all is as fun and sweet as the young leads’ love. Considering this is a Wes Anderson film there’s a sense of tragedy underlining the playful style and witty jokes. Moonrise Kingdom explores themes of disappointment and lost love, something all the older characters are facing, and something the two kids may one day face as well. However, these themes and ideas to Anderson and Coppola’s work are not as deliberate as some suspect. As Roman Coppola puts it, it all comes from a place of intuition.

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Jared Gilman and Kara Hayward in Moonrise Kingdom

It’s the summer of 1965, and a storm is heading towards New Penzance Island. The small dot of land is home to a few permanent residences, but it’s also a seasonal destination for a troop of Khaki Scouts who camp amidst the lush green forests and golden fields. Scout Master Ward (Edward Norton) awakes one morning to discover the troop’s least liked member, Sam (Jared Gilman), has gone missing. Elsewhere on the island the Bishop family realizes their daughter Suzy (Kara Hayward) has also disappeared. The two pre-teens fell for each other the year prior during a brief, chance meeting, and have now taken off on an adventure as young lovers are prone to do (in movies at least). Sam and Suzy soon have half the island searching for them, but being such a small, sparsely populated place that search party consists almost entirely of the Scout Master, the local constable, Captain Sharp (Bruce Willis) and Suzy’s parents, Walt and Laura (Bill Murray, Frances McDormand). Wes Anderson‘s latest film splits its time between the kids on the run and their mostly adult pursuers, and in doing so it tells two sides of a story that offer equal amounts of humor, whimsy and heartbreak. It’s a return to form for the director and his first to follow-up on the promise of Rushmore and The Royal Tenenbaums as it highlights the wide-eyed possibilities of youth and the harsh reality of adulthood.

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After getting fired from his awful hit TV show Two and a Half Men Charlie Sheen had a very public meltdown that took public meltdowns to a new level by even including a public meltdown world tour. Though Sheen’s stage show was largely met with panning and boos, it still sold a lot of tickets. This country loves it when public figures fall off their pedestal. But we also love a good comeback story, and it seems like we’ve already reached that point in the Sheen narrative. These celebrity rise and fall stories are getting shorter and shorter every time they happen. I blame VH1’s Behind the Music for hammering the formula into everyone’s heads. Someone goes nuts from addiction and we can just go on auto-pilot in our response.

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published: 04.19.2014
A-
published: 04.19.2014
B+
published: 04.18.2014
C-
published: 04.18.2014
C

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