[REC2]

[REC]3: Genesis

The zombie genre has a long way to go before it becomes as annoying as the vampire one, but it’s well on its way to becoming just as ubiquitous. Most of them fall by the wayside into a generic pile of body parts and walk/run arguments, but there are a few that stand out for their inventiveness, energy and pure terror. Two of the best examples in recent years come courtesy of Spanish co-directors Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza. [Rec] and [Rec]2 tied the “found footage” trend to a zombie-like outbreak with both films consisting strictly of handheld (or helmet mounted) camera footage wielded by the characters themselves. They both take place in the same building and are ridiculously and wonderfully terrifying. (The zombie moniker is arguable as they most resemble the mindless ghouls from 28 Days Later, but just run with it. Or walk with it.) The third film, Genesis, loses Balagueró’s involvement as Plaza takes on solo directing duties. Unfortunately, he at some point inexplicably decided the [Rec] films were lacking in laughs and felt he could rectify that here. He tries to infuse comedy into the story, and even though he fails repeatedly each stab at humor lessens any hope for the horror side of things. Jokes fall flat. Terror, tension and fear are non-existent. And we quickly realize which half of the original directing duo held all the talent.

read more...

This Week in DVD

It’s my birthday this week, and it therefore seems only fitting that the BUY section is overflowing with fantastic and fun titles worth picking up and enjoying with your friends, families, and parole officers. They even represent a pretty good blend of genres with horror (Insidious, [Rec]2), animated kid fare (Rango), and some classics from the silent era (Buster Keaton). Other titles out this week include The Lincoln Lawyer, Arthur, Battle Beyond the Stars and more. As always, if you see something you like, click on the image to buy it. Buster Keaton: The Short Films 1920-1923 Charlie Chaplin may be the most famous name of the silent film era, but equally beloved and far less controversial is the man behind Cole Abaius’s favorite film, The General. Buster Keaton had a long career both before and after that Civil War-themed classic, and this newly remastered set includes all nineteen of his solo shorts along with a roaring freight train full of extras. The shorts are filled with sharp comedy and incredible physical stunts with some of the best being One Week, The Goat, and Cops. The extras include visual essays, deleted scenes, two additional shorts that see Keaton sharing the screen with the likes of Chaplin, Harold Lloyd, and Fatty Arbuckle, and newly recorded audio commentary with Keaton himself. Okay, that last one isn’t true, but this is still a brilliant collection.

read more...

After stunning audiences with their first two films, Plaza and Balaguero are each taking on a REC film of their own.

read more...
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Comic-Con 2014
Summer Box Office Prediction Challenge
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3