Popcorn Horror

Twinkle Toes

This week we’re highlighting the films of Popcorn Horror’s Blood Games. Give it a watch, then head over to vote if you like it. Why Watch? A man suspended by his wrists, a secret kiss in a garden, a bloody tourniquet. This short film from Dan O’Connell is more of a patchwork of scenes, floating freely between each other. All of them play out and add up to the reality behind some bloody mayhem. The production value here is fantastic. The camera dances around, changing up styles appropriately for romantic seques and dreamlike flashbacks alike. It’s also not too shabby when it comes to the red stuff. It’s a kind of feverish tango that features some eyebrow raising visuals, gorgeous scenery and a slightly disturbing story featuring two women scorned. What Will It Cost? About 11 minutes. Skip Work. Watch More Short Films.

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Mortified Short Film

This week we’re highlighting the films of Popcorn Horror’s Blood Games. Give it a watch, then head over to vote if you like it. Why Watch? A young girl closes her eyes, begins counting, and her friends all start to hide. It’s a common game, but hide-and-go-seek doesn’t usually involve a gigantic masked man stalking the house with a butcher knife. Robert Nevitt‘s short is a quick trip that has a bit of a low budget charm and some cheek to it. A tiny diversion, it’s a story in service of a punchline, but the delivery is still sweet, and the title is spot-on. What Will It Cost? About 2 minutes. Skip Work. Watch More Short Films.

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Survivalismo

This week we’re highlighting the films of Popcorn Horror’s Blood Games. Give it a watch, then head over to vote if you like it. Why Watch? This short is all about patience in its execution. When it opens, a hooded man has a noose around his neck as he tip-toes on top of a wobbly chair. The filmmakers made the difficult decision to calmly watch what he does, and it becomes an agonizing few minutes. It’s the empty moments that cut the most, but the stranger dangling on the edge of death gets to swim through a kind of 5 Stages of Grief while questioning what he’s done to earn his new hemp necktie. Unfortunately, it builds to an ending that doesn’t quite work. It’s a nice blended metaphor trying too hard to have an external consequence. They were so patient in letting his internal struggle play out, but they (for whatever reason) couldn’t resist the urge to put an unnecessary cherry on top. What Will It Cost? About 8 minutes. Skip Work. Watch More Short Films.

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Blood Roulette

This week we’re highlighting the films of Popcorn Horror’s Blood Games. Give it a watch, then head over to vote if you like it. Why Watch? This low-budget short from Mark Callum is little more than a display of a nifty nail-through-the-hand effect. In it, four men sit around a table while one shuffles Styrofoam cups around. Once each has their own cup in front of them, they start slamming their hands down to see whose is empty and whose has a sharp surprise waiting on the other end. Again, the marks of a limited budget are visible here, although what they lack in camera quality, they make up for in camera movement. The shots are interesting, but the drama is drawn a bit thin considering how generally uninteresting watching someone shuffle cups can be. What they get away with is cool, but it’s still a fairly bland platter to serve up a single idea, and while the ending comes as a shock, it does so by killing any tension the game itself can have. What Will It Cost? About 4 minutes. Skip Work. Watch More Short Films.

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Click Short FIlm

This week we’re highlighting the films of Popcorn Horror’s Blood Games. Give it a watch, then head over to vote if you like it. Why Watch? In the opening moments of this short from William Prince, a few children are playing in the courtyard of what looks like an abandoned set of buildings. The “Lord of the Flies” feeling continues as they bicker between each other, but generally goof around (ominously) without any supervision. Then the feeling grows. These kids are more than alone. There doesn’t seem to be another living being in existence. But they’re about to play a simple game that suggests they aren’t the only ones on the block. The tension in Click is pretty much immediate thanks to a droning score, a Dickensian set of buildings haunting a modern time and children who are woefully unguarded. That intrigue never lets up, and we get to see Prince and DP Mark Reeson deliver some spine-chillingly suggestive framing — mostly playing around the the geometry of the buildings. And then there’s the game. Echoing a quick match of Bloody Mary, the children gather round a light switch and see what happens when everything goes dark. From here, it’s near-perfect execution of a quiet, reserved terror all the way to the finish line. What Will It Cost? About 12 minutes. Skip Work. Watch More Short Films.

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