Peter Stormare

Bad Milo

We’re only one day away from viewing Ken Marino‘s bowel-dwelling little monster in all its gory glory – Bad Milo will be hitting VOD tomorrow. But for those who can’t wait (or who feel that Bad Milo‘s level of weird deserves to be seen on the big screen, which’ll happen on October 4), a brand new clip from the film can be viewed below. I urge you to do so, lest you fall victim to your own butt demon. It’s pretty clear why Marino’s character has so much pent-up rage (among other things bottled up inside him). His wife doesn’t respect him. It’s not clear if his therapist actually respects him, as Peter Stormare is behaving like a lunatic and may not even be a real therapist. Although the sock puppets do seem to be working. And Duncan (Marino’s character) seems to have a few hidden father issues, as we can figure out once his sock puppet role-play starts to get a little out of hand. Take a look:

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fargotruth-1

Let’s paint a dark picture: You’ve finally snapped and committed the heinous act of murder. The problem is that you let it happen without properly planning things out. Now, you have this nasty little human corpse lying around. How do you get rid of it? Movies and literature have offered clever ways to get rid of dead bodies for years. In Luc Besson’s Nikita, Victor “The Cleaner” (Jean Reno) uses acid to dissolve bodies in a tub. In Psycho, Norman Bates mummifies his mother and keeps her around for posterity’s sake. And in the Coen Brothers’ Fargo, Gaear Grimsrud (Peter Stormare) feeds Carl Showalter (Steve Buscemi) to a woodchipper. Since concentrated acid is hard to come by (right, Mr. White?), and none of us at FSR have very good taxidermy skills, we got to wondering: Is a woodchipper an effective way to dispose of a body?

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Bad Milo

There’s no better way to enjoy the afternoon than by watching a horrible little demon crawl out of someone’s butt. Thankfully, a new red band trailer for Bad Milo presents that very opportunity. Bad Milo seems like the very definition of “polarizing.” Either you very much want to see a demon crammed up someone’s rear end, or you’ll do everything within your power to avoid seeing that very image. But for those in the “interested” column, Bad Milo has a lot to offer. The cast is a huge plus – composed entirely of extraordinarily talented, under-the-radar character actors (Peter Stormare, Stephen Root), or alumni from TV shows with rabid fan followings (Ken Marino, Gillian Jacobs, Patrick Warburton). A cast like this would imply that Bad Milo would lean heavily on comedy over horror, but the trailer makes it quite clear: this is not a film to skimp on the blood and guts. Most of what we see in these two minutes is a lot of blood spray and cutaway gore, but seems more a product of the trailer than the actual film. All those quick cuts hint at something much more devious (and disgusting) – Milo separating a doctor from his nose, and another character getting chomped in a place far worse than where Milo came out of. By definition, Bad Milo is going to drive a lot of people screaming in the opposite direction. But those who don’t will be in for a seriously good time. Watch the new trailer below if you dare. Seriously, though. This one’s a redband, so expect lots of gore and also […]

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laststand19

As written, The Last Stand is not an interesting movie. It’s a simple modern-day western as action flick with dialogue that’s nearly 100% expositional and a plot that offers nothing in the way of surprise, suspense or subtlety. It could really have been made at any time and starred any major or minor actor and been roughly the same as what we’re looking at this weekend with Arnold Schwarzenegger in the leading role. But The Last Stand is arriving now and indeed with Schwarzenegger’s name on the top of the marquee, his first starring vehicle in ten years. That makes the movie of note all by itself, in such a way that it might as well be actually titled “The Return of Arnold Schwarzenegger.” Or “Arnold is Back,” although this would imply that it’s an opportunity for winking bits of self-awareness. Surprisingly, there’s not a lot of silly references to the Arnie classics and signature lines. He thankfully got the obvious “I’m back” shtick out of his system in last year’s The Expendables 2.

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Bill Murray at Cannes 2012

What is Casting Couch? It’s the casting roundup that’s got news about what weird, clown-related thing Peter Stormare is going to do next. Read on for the juicy details. If your name is Dan Aykroyd or Ivan Reitman, then Bill Murray has been spending the last ten years or so trying to convince you that he doesn’t read scripts. That’s got to sting, because Deadline has a new report that proves this to be balderdash. Murray read Ted Melfi’s script for St. Vincent De Van Nuys and identified with the writer’s work so much that he called him up and invited him out for a drive. One negotiating process later and Murray is reportedly ready to sign on to star in the film, which is about a cantankerous old coot who bonds with a twelve-year-old boy over rounds of drinking, gambling, and generally despicable behavior. Sounds like it’s going to be a hoot.

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The Last Stand

When The Last Stand hits theaters in a few months it will finally put an answer to two congruent question marks. One, can Arnold Schwarzenegger still carry an action film? And B, can Kim Ji-woon manage the same level of quality with his American debut that he’s enjoyed with his Korean films? The first teaser for the film gave us little to judge (aside from too much of co-star Johnny Knoxville), but now a true trailer has debuted. It fleshes out the supporting cast to include Forest Whitaker, Peter Stormare, Luis Guzman and Jaimie Alexander (who was kind enough to bring along the tiny town from Thor), but the story remains similarly simplistic. A high-profile prisoner escapes federal custody and makes for the Mexican border in a souped-up sports car and protected by a small army of thugs. The only thing standing between him and freedom? A small-town sheriff, his ill-equipped deputies and the guy who pretended to be mentally handicapped from The Ringer. Check out the full trailer below.

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Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters

Everybody has heard the old fairy tale of Hansel and Gretel. It’s a story about two little German children, a cannibal witch with a taste for tender flesh, a ginger bread house, and a blazing hot industrial oven. One question most people probably have never asked, however, is what happens after the story ends. Well director/co-writer of Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters, Tommy Wirkola (Dead Snow), did ask that question, and what he decided is that those little scamps probably “got a taste for witch blood” and grew up to be leather-clad badasses who hunt down witches with their extensive knowledge of kung fu and never-ending arsenal of futuristic firepower.

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Stop me if you’ve heard this one before – in a future America, an important member of the First Family gets trapped in an inventive super-max prison the likes of which we’ve never seen, and the only person who can save them is a sharp-tongued criminal. Sounds pretty familiar, right? Unfortunately, James Mather and Stephen St. Leger‘s Lockout is no Escape from New York, but dammit if Guy Pearce‘s performance doesn’t hit some gleeful Snake Plissken-inspired high notes in the midst of some serious cinematic mess. Mather and St. Leger’s take (which comes from an original idea from co-writer and producer Luc Besson) on the “one man against a mega-prison” moves the action away from not just New York, but Earth itself – setting the majority of Lockout in a super prison in the sky. MS One is the first of its kind, a space prison that uses the unique advantages of its location to isolate its prisoners twofold – not only are they trapped in space, they’re also sunk into a deep stasis that should guarantee that escape is not only impossible, but also unthinkable to their conked-out brains. Unfortunately, as we’re told repeatedly, “some minds just can’t take it,” and the philanthropically-minded Emilie Warnock (Maggie Grace) has just arrived on MS One to interview some recently awoken prisoners to gauge the effects of their stasis. Emilie also happens to be the President of the United States’ only daughter, a fact that the audience knows from the get-go, even […]

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The skin-crawling world of Small Apartments is presented without irony or judgment – so it’s not surprising that, in such an off-kilter environment, Matt Lucas’ Franklin Franklin (yes, that’s really his name) sounds relatively sane. Even when he’s off-handedly confessing to the murder of his landlord, Lucas’ delivery is so deadpan that no one takes him seriously – after all, why would Franklin kill anyone? Oh, possibly because (like everybody else in his crumbling apartment building) he’s totally deranged?

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The Coroner

The horror genre gets a bad rap. Virtually all horror movies are dismissed out of hand when it comes to having something to say. Who can take a message out of all that blood and violence? Well when the world is bloody and violence, I say horror films are the perfect venue to tell some stories and in a graphic way. Undocumented, from first-timer Chris Peckover, uses the topical subject of illegal immigration in America as it’s setting. Don’t run away! While there is obviously some politics at play here, the film doesn’t delve too far into the seriousness of the politics, but it does perhaps give you pause to think about the situation, at least some aspects of it. The film follows a group of grad students making a film about illegal border crossings and those who take advantage of illegal labor. During a border crossing for their documentary, the group ends up getting kidnapped alongside the illegal immigrants by a violent border control group.

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Guy Pearce is one of those actors you keep hoping will become a big star. The man’s been in some fantastic films (Memento, LA Confidential, The Proposition) and almost always gives a stellar performance no matter the size of the role or quality of the movie. But for some reason he’s never quite taken off the way he deserves. Not that he’s been hard up for work… he appeared in HBO’s much-lauded miniseries Mildred Pierce earlier this year and per IMDB has twelve upcoming projects in various stages of development including Ridley Scott’s highly anticipated Prometheus. But before he stars in the alien movie that has absolutely nothing to do with Alien, he’s heading to a far lower profile region of space. Lock-Out is about a convicted criminal (Pearce) who’s given a singular chance at freedom if he can rescue the President’s daughter from the middle of a space station prison riot. The film is the feature directorial debut of James Mather and Stephen St. Leger who also co-wrote the script with the busiest man in France, Luc Besson, so you know if nothing else there’s going to be some fun, logic-free action. The short description makes it sound like the sequel to Escape From New York we should have gotten instead of the abysmal one we did. Check out the teaser trailer below.

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What is Movie News After Dark? It’s a nightly movie news column that refuses to wear a fat suit. Unless it’s Halloween, because then it will be dressing up as Patton Oswalt. Because no one else is doing it, even though they should be. For those who have not heard yet, Eddie Murphy will host the upcoming 84th edition of the Academy Awards. According to show producer and Murphy fanclub vice president Brett Ratner, Eddie Murphy was meant to be Oscar host. Because the golden guy’s special night needs nothing more than a little fatsuit comedy — that’s why!

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Movies We Love

“It’s the size of Texas, Mr. President.” Does it get any better than that? Of course it doesn’t. Armageddon is without doubt one of the finest motion pictures ever created by humans. If that snippet of dialogue made audible by Mr. Billy Bob Thornton himself didn’t convince you, maybe this will. “You think we’ll get hazard pay for this?” I’m going to pretend you’ve been living under a rock since 1998 and summarize one of the greatest summer blockbuster films ever made for you. So Billy Bob Thorton is sort of the head honcho of NASA and one day he’s supervising a standard in-space satellite repair when all of a sudden a meteor shower rips his crew to pieces. We then cut to New York City, which seems to always be the city that gets destroyed in big budget disaster movies, and sure enough the meteors tear through the city demolishing Grand Central Station, decapitating the Chrysler Building [insert Unstoppable joke here] and finally, in a moment fraught with unintended significance, the camera slowly zooms out to show the twin towers of the World Trade Center on fire. Then we’re treated to quickly cut scenes of people yelling and running through hallways and trying to figure out why Keith David keeps calling. Essentially, a giant asteroid is on a collision course with Earth and no matter where it hits, it will wipe out all life as we know it. Jason Isaacs convinces the President that the best plan is to […]

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Small Town Murder Songs – directed by Ed Gass-Donnelly Festival screening times – 3/6 @ 430pm, 3/11 @ 245pm Walter (Peter Stormare) is the police chief of a small Ontario town where the most violent happenings are usually bar fights between drunken locals. He himself was a violent man once upon a time, but the love of a good woman (Martha Plimpton) and a newfound faith in God have changed him for the better. Or have they? The nude body of a young woman is found on the outskirts of town, and Walter soon identifies a prime suspect for her rape and murder. Trouble is the man is a local who not only shares a violent past with Walter but is currently living with Walter’s ex, Rita (Jill Hennessy). As the investigation continues his findings and motivations come under scrutiny by an outside detective, and the foundations of his recently built, peaceful exterior begin to crack. Can this newly baptized man of God resist the temptations of the past and the pull towards violence and survive his path to redemption?

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Jeremy Renner. Famke Jannsen. Now Peter Stormare. The casting for Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters is enough to send interest into the stratosphere. I also here Gemma Arterton can act one out of every three movies or so, so she’s ripe for this one. According to Deadline Växjö, Stormare will be joining the fantasy film as a sheriff with some ethical problems named Berringer. Like his bad-tasting-wine name suggests, he’ll be playing a bad guy. Is there anything more to say about that? Stormare, villain, done deal. The guy is terrifying, and for all the roles fans most likely recognize him for, one that still has yet to see US theaters or rental queues is Corridor where he barely says anything and still remains almost solely responsible for nerve-destroying fear. Of course this isn’t the first time Stormare has ventured into this territory. He played a gun-toting character in Terry Gilliam’s The Brothers Grimm back in 2005.

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Tension and paranoia are difficult to capture. That’s probably why it’s a rare commodity in film – or maybe it’s simply because filmmakers don’t have the patience and restraint required to craft something so carefully anymore. Bold statements about the current temperature of moviemaking aside, it’s still both refreshing and horrifying to see the legacy of thrillers done so proudly with this flick. Corridor is Rear Window with sound instead of sight. It’s the story of a young medical student, Frank (Emil Johnsen), who keeps to himself, boarding up inside his apartment to study at night. When a woman named Lotte (Ylva Gallon) moves in upstairs, Frank is drawn into her life and her relationship with an abusive boyfriend. Frank hears the domestic violence through his ceiling and becomes a new target for the boyfriend (played by the always-unnerving Peter Stormare).

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mwl-fargo

This week we feature the best movie the Coen Brothers have made and one of the greatest of all time.

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