Nicole Kidman

Grace of Monaco Movie

Olivier Dahan’s Grace of Monaco opens with a big fat asterisk: “The following is a fictional account inspired by real events.” Many biopics take liberties with their subjects’ lives, but beyond Grace Kelly’s marriage to Prince Rainier III of Monaco and the Prince’s later stalemate with President Charles de Gaulle of France over the colony’s status as a tax haven for big business, the majority of Monaco is a hokey fiction that imagines that the beloved actress may have been key to fending off French forces as a solution to her concurrent personal, professional and political crises. It’s 1962, and Grace (Nicole Kidman) is ill at ease with her new duties as European royalty. The locals don’t care for her philanthropic efforts, her husband (Tim Roth) doesn’t want her to return to Hollywood despite Alfred Hitchcock’s offer to star in Marnie, and the French government’s efforts to tax Monaco residents in order to afford an ongoing war in Algeria threaten the small country’s stability. On top of that, a traitor in their midst appears to be leaking private matters to the public. What’s a princess to do?

read more...

Scarlett Johansson in Under the Skin

No one could ever accuse Jonathan Glazer of opting for quantity over quality. The British filmmaker has made only three movies in the span of 14 years, including his latest, Under the Skin. During that time, and before he made his feature debut in 2000 with Sexy Beast, Glazer directed music videos for Radiohead, UNKLE, Massive Attack, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds and more of your favorite bands. He’s also done commercials for Nike, Audi, Guinness and Motorola. Glazer has a résumé to brag about. He’s done well for himself, which is probably why our interview with him is at the Chateau Marmont, which smells of money. Maybe it’s all the 20-year-olds coming in and out with their Rolls-Royces that gives it that scent. Still, the rather cozy and surprisingly low-key hotel is an ideal place to speak with Glazer. And the 49-year-old director is in good spirits when we meet him. He’s proud of a very important fact: whether you like Under the Skin or not, he made the movie he wanted to make.

read more...

GRace of Monaco

Way back in September, our own Samantha Wilson quite sagely compared the first teaser for Olivier Dahan’s Grace of Monaco to “the world’s most expensive perfume commercial,” a little slice of action that is “what you expect a princess’ world to look like — rich and opulent.” The Nicole Kidman-starring Grace Kelly biopic was presented as an opera-infused tale of, well, just like a lot of sparkles and shine and fuzzy filming, sort of as if Dahan is someone who really likes watching that Charlize Theron commercial for Dior in slow motion but then wanted to spice that look up by filming stuff his own production through six layers of cellophane. In short, not great. But after some behind the scenes drama involving Dahan’s final cut, the apparent demands of Harvey Weinstein, and a release date shove, Grace of Monaco is finally set to hit theaters with a possibly tweaked look and feel. But does that translate to this new full-length trailer? Let’s find out.

read more...

paddington_poster

“If you see something, say something.” It’s a simple rule. Unattended packages are a matter for the authorities — they could be stuffed full of explosives, chemical weaponry, or even vicious Peruvian wildlife intent on draining Great Britain’s marmalade reserves dry. Yet the first teaser for Paddington flies in the face of public transportation’s basic safety procedures. There’s London’s Paddington Railway Station, and right smack in the middle of the platform is an unattended package. One large enough to comfortably fit an adorable stuffed bear. Clearly, multiple passersby must have seen something. Yet not a single one said something. Shameful. Paddington is a cautionary tale of Britain’s undocumented immigrant bears, and the damage they’ve been doing to the nation’s economy. Or, if the film’s synopsis can be believed, it’s the tale of a wayward stuffed bear who’s taken in by a kind family, all while being stalked by an evil taxidermist (Nicole Kidman). Presumably, she’s after the secret of how a stuffed animal can walk and talk and consume so much marmalade without being beset upon by ants.

read more...

It must be tough, living life in Hollywood as an Australian actor or actress. There will always be that great Pacific gap between work and family, between new life and old, between lush palm trees and an endless parade of lethally venomous snakes and spiders. Strangerland is an opportunity for a few Australians to head back home – specifically, Nicole Kidman, Guy Pearce, and Hugo Weaving, who’ve all been cast in the upcoming film (according to a scoop at Variety). Strangerland, which is billed as a “mystery drama,” is about a couple who loses their children in the harsh and unforgiving terrain of the Australian Outback. If one were to make a few educated guesses about the cast, one might find it likely that Kidman and Pearce will play the worried parents, while Weaving will play some kind of raving lunatic holding the kids at bay. Or perhaps he’ll be a friendly law enforcement officer. Or the film will go the Cloud Atlas route and have Weaving play a menacing Nurse Ratched-type for some reason.

read more...

wife

Since its release this June, A.S.A. Harrison’s novel “The Silent Wife” has quickly become a pretty huge hit, though unfortunately the author passed away in April, a few months before its release, and never got a chance to enjoy its success. She did leave behind an estate, however, and it seems that said estate has been having some dealings with Hollywood over the past few months. Deadline is reporting that Nicole Kidman and frequent literature adaptors Mazur/Kaplan have teamed to acquire the film rights to the book, and they’re currently setting it up as a starring vehicle for the actress. The story is described as being a psychological thriller that details the dissolution of a marriage from the alternating perspectives of both the man and the woman, though just saying that it’s about a marriage ending doesn’t quite seem like it does the thing justice. When you dig a little deeper, it begins to become clear that there’s something dangerous at the heart of this tale that transcends a couple of people deciding who gets to keep the couch.

read more...

GRace of Monaco

While Naomi Watts has garnered attention and a teensy bit of criticism for portraying the People’s Princess in Diana, Nicole Kidman is preparing to step into another iconic princess’ slippers: Grace Kelly. Though the teaser trailer for Olivier Dahan‘s Grace of Monaco is just a sliver of a minute long and could potentially be the world’s most expensive perfume commercial if you’re not paying too close of attention, it provides a beautiful little glimpse into what you expect a princess’ world to look like — rich and opulent. That opera music is just naturally occurring, too. They didn’t add that in during post. Check out the trailer for yourself here:

read more...

naomi:nicole

We’ve been hearing about Werner Herzog’s Gertrude Bell biopic, Queen of the Desert, for quite a while now. Not only is it an enticing project because it’s going to see a crazy man like Herzog taking a film crew out to the desert for a big shoot, but it was also looking like something everyone was going to look forward to because it had Naomi Watts starring as Bell. Everyone loves Naomi Watts, especially when she gets to play a strong character like Bell, who was an explorer, politician, archeologist, and who did quite a bit to influence policy in the Middle East during the early parts of the 20th century. Basically, she was Indiana Jones crossed with Obi-Wan Kenobi, but real. And a lady. The bad news here is that Deadline is reporting Watts can no longer star in the film. And really, who can blame her? Being out in the desert with Herzog for who knows how long sounds scary as all get out. The good news is that the production still looks to be on, as Herzog has found another white lady with an accent, Nicole Kidman, to take her place.

read more...

trailer the railway man

Another film currently showing in Toronto, but one that we haven’t heard too much about is Jonathan Teplitzky‘s The Railway Man. And why is that? Based on the first official trailer, the film has all the trappings for commercial success: Colin Firth, Nicole Kidman, Stellan Skarsgard, WWII and a bevy of emotions to keep you invested in hearing this story play out. Firth plays Eric Lomax, a WWII soldier captured in Singapore and held in a Japanese POW camp, where he and his fellow soldiers were brutally tortured after they refused to help build the Thai-Burma Railway. Flash forward to after the war, when Firth has survived and is trying desperately to find a sense of normalcy in life and overcome what happened in the camp – which his wife (Kidman) wants to understand in some way. Coping for Lomax appears to partly means tracking down his captor and dishing out what he was served. Check out the trailer below.

read more...

downeyfavreau

What is Casting Couch? It’s your place to catch up with all of the casting news that broke over the weekend. Just a couple days away from the Internet and you missed news involving Nicole Kidman, Kate Winslet, and Samuel L. Jackson. Catch up! One of the biggest reasons Robert Downey Jr. is experiencing a huge career resurgence right now is that Jon Favreau fought to cast him as the lead in the first Iron Man movie. After Downey killed it in that movie and he and Favreau made about a gabillion dollars together on it and the sequel, one would imagine a lifetime friendship was forged. That’s why, even though Favreau’s next film is a little indie dramedy he’s starring in himself called Chef, he’s still able to call in a big favor and have a huge star like Downey join the ensemble cast. Variety reports that Downey is now on board to work in the film alongside actors like Sofia Vergara, John Leguizamo, and Bobby Cannavale.

read more...

Brad Pitt

What is Casting Couch? It’s casting news. A bunch of it. All in one place. Today we’ve got the short list of young ladies who may be playing Cinderella in Kenneth Branagh’s upcoming Disney film, among other things. People seemed to love watching Brad Pitt don military garb and do a World War II movie for Quentin Tarantino, so it stands to reason they should be willing to line up to watch him go period again for David Ayer. According to Heat Vision, the director is looking to sign the star for his upcoming WWII-set project, Fury. If he becomes official, he’ll be taking the lead role of the film, which is an ensemble piece that will follow the 5-man crew of an American tank. More specifically, it follows the 5-man crew of an American tank in the waning days of the war, as they come across a battered and desperate division of German soldiers. Ayer wrote the film and sold it to QED on spec, which is going to start to look like a smart investment on their part if a star as recognizable as Pitt becomes official.

read more...

park

In his American film debut, Stoker, director Park Chan-wook‘s sensibility remains intact. Nothing about his sense of humor, eye for framing, or his stylish and brutal portrayal of violence has been softened or altered. The film plays in genre, which Park refers to as a “castle” he likes to regularly take twists and turns in. The critically-acclaimed director doesn’t see himself above genre, though. Park doesn’t subvert genre staples but fully embraces them with a slightly twisted view. We briefly spoke with Park about his genre work, how he’s made an R-rated version of Peter Pan, and more in our spoiler-y chat with him

read more...

Stoker Movie

Editor’s note: This review originally ran as part of our Sundance 2013 coverage, but we’re re-running it to coincide with its arrival in limited theatrical release on 3/1. Park Chan-wook‘s films are held in deservedly high regard for various reasons. They’re often filled with desperate characters trapped in twisted, madcap situations, and while their worlds are violent and deadly places they’re never less than beautiful. He has an eye for framing and staging intensely attractive scenes of people laid bare emotionally and physically. His first English-language film, Stoker, opens in US theaters next month, and it’s already one of the year’s most visually appealing and strikingly stylish films. Unfortunately that’s pretty much all it is. India Stoker’s (Mia Wasikowska) father has died suddenly, but before she and her emotionally estranged mother (Nicole Kidman) can even begin to grieve, an uncle (Matthew Goode) she was previously unaware of arrives on their doorstep. Soon India’s already fractured world takes an ominous turn as people begin to disappear and Uncle Charlie’s interest in her moves in some inappropriate directions.

read more...

Michael Keaton

What is Casting Couch? It’s the casting news round-up that’s been rich with reports all week thanks to deals coming out of Berlin. Also, today we find out what Colin Firth and Nicole Kidman are teaming up for next. There was a period in the ’80s where Michael Keaton may have been the most famous man on the planet, and everything just seemed to be in its right place. While he’s worked fairly steadily ever since, it just never seems like we get to see him in enough movies these days, so every new announcement ends up being exciting. The latest, from Heat Vision, is that Keaton has joined the cast of that video game-inspired car chase movie, Need For Speed. According to the trade, he’ll be playing the eccentric host of an underground race that attracts all the best drivers from around the world—sort of like the Kumite, but with wheels doing burnouts instead of feet kicking faces. Hopefully this affords Keaton plenty of opportunity to snort and chomp gum.

read more...

The Best Damn Oscar Blog

The Oscar nominations will be announced next Thursday, January 10th. Who’s excited? Perhaps more tellingly, who’s geared up enough to wake up early to watch the press conference live? It’s at 5:30AM PT! I’m planning on it, but I’ll probably just add another year to my tradition of sleeping through my alarm and missing all of the fun. That’s a shame, because surprises are always best in the moment. And there are always surprises. The trick is trying to predict them. Last year people were somewhat taken aback by Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close grabbing a Best Picture nomination, intrigued when Demián Bachir pulled off the nod for Best Actor, and impressed when little distributor GKIDS managed to get both A Cat in Paris and Chico and Rita in for Best Animated Feature. There are also always a few omissions that upset the common wisdom. Remember when Dreamgirls missed a nomination for Picture, knocked out by Letters from Iwo Jima? The twists and turns make the season fun. You wouldn’t want to wake up that early only to have all your bland suppositions simply confirmed by the Academy. So let’s predict the unpredictable! Here are five potential surprises to look for next Thursday morning. Don’t hold it against me if I’m wrong, but if I’m right you should totally tell all your friends.

read more...

What is Casting Couch? It’s the casting news roundup that’s ready for the weekend. Colin Firth is kind of a sneaky hunk. At first glance he’s pretty handsome, but not the most attractive dude in the world, and then he’s got this charm to him that just grows on you until you’ve scrawled his name on all of your Trapper Keepers. He’s such saucy dish that it looks like he can make even a big name star like Nicole Kidman develop a schoolgirl crush. THR is reporting that she liked playing his wife in the recent World War II drama The Railway Man so much that she’s now actively recruiting him to join her in her next project, Before I Go to Sleep. Apparently, Before I Go to Sleep is an adaptation of a S.J. Watson novel about an amnesiac woman whose husband must reintroduce himself to her every morning. Early attempts at titling the film The Rich Man’s 50 First Dates were reportedly rejected by the studio.

read more...

Stoker poster

Three of the leading South Korean film directors are set to make their English language debuts next year, and while we’re incredibly excited to see all three succeed we’d be lying if we said we weren’t a little bit nervous too. First out of the gate will be Kim Jee-woon’s The Last Stand in January, and last to hit theaters will be Bong Joon-ho’s Snow Piercer late in the year. Nestled in between those two is the March release of Park Chan-wook‘s Stoker. But judging by the recent trailer debut and this newly released poster I don’t think we need to worry anymore that Hollywood has squashed Park’s creativity and talents. In a world where most poster “designs” are simply photoshop jobs appealing to the lowest common denominator Park and Fox Searchlight have opted instead to go with true art. Check out the full poster below.

read more...

the paperboy

The Paperboy is, to put it bluntly, quite like a swamp. It is hazy, disorienting, and full of disgusting images. It is so densely packed and so haphazardly arranged that the experience of watching it is not unlike trying to find one’s way out of the Everglades with only a machete and a faulty compass. With this, his third feature, Lee Daniels has created a fictional universe in which rhyme and reason, focus and direction, and even basic character motivation seem like forgotten concepts. It is the sort of film that makes you miss Mystery Science Theater 3000. It’s amazing. Ostensibly, this is a Southern-fried film noir, riffing on such films as In the Heat of the Night and Mississippi Burning. Matthew McConaughey is Ward Jansen, a muckraking journalist for the Miami Times, back in his tiny home town to expose the wrongful conviction of Hillary Van Wetter (John Cusack) for the murder of the county sheriff. He was given the tip by Charlotte Bless (Nicole Kidman), who is currently engaged to Hillary even though they’ve never actually met. Ward’s partner is the dashing and difficult Yardley Acheman (David Oyelowo), a sort of British take on Virgil Tibbs. They hire Ward’s buff brother Jack (Zac Efron) as their driver. All of this is narrated by the Jansen’s former maid, Anita Chester (Macy Gray). In the ensuing detective drama not much actually gets investigated. It’s the summer of ’69, the air is sticky and sweltering, and the entire cast is in […]

read more...

Stoker Trailer

There’s nothing quite like a dead dad, a hot uncle, and a wicked mother to really mess a kid up. After all, that classic formula worked out totally okay (read: horribly) for young Hamlet and myriad others who were inspired by Shakespeare’s classic work, so why not just keep on keeping on with said formula? Sound a little played out? What if Park Chan-wookwas steering it? Oh, you’re interested now, are you? The Oldboy and Thirst director finally brings his talents to an English-language feature with the Wentworth Miller- and Erin Cressida Wilson-penned Stoker, starring Mia Wasikwoska, Matthew Goode, and a deliciously evil Nicole Kidman. The film’s first trailer makes its Hamlet bones clear early on, introducing us to India (Wasikowska), her nutball mother (Kidman), her recently departed dad (Dermot Mulroney), and the uncle she never knew she had (Goode), who comes to, ahem, attend to some things after ol’ Daddy Stoker’s death. And then, well, then things take a turn. Take a look:

read more...

The Paperboy Movie Lee Daniels

While it does not seem likely that anyone would have expected that Nicole Kidman would have something of a career resurgence at the hands of a hack like Lee Daniels and a film that sees her peeing on Zac Efron in an apparent act of love but, hey, Hollywood is insane (as evidenced by the fact that Daniels gets to even make movies). As part of that resurgence, Kidman will be honored with a Gala Tribute at this year’s New York Film Festival. The tribute will include both an on-stage conversation with Kidman and a screening of The Paperboy (don’t let my disdain for Daniels obscure the fact that I cannot wait to see this film and am deeply jealous of all the Gothamites who will see it at NYFF). The festival has also announced that they will be holding another Gala Tribute during the second half of the festival to honor their own Film Society program director and head of the festival’s selection committee, Richard Peña. These announcements come on the heels of further additions to the festival’s slate, including an “immaculate” 8K digital restoration of David Lean‘s Lawrence of Arabia, a special 25th anniversary screening of Rob Reiner‘s The Princess Bride, Rodney Ascher‘s Sundance and Cannes favorite Room 237, and Francesco Patierno‘s “salacious and fascinating” The War of the Volcanoes. These picks join the festival’s previously-announced main slate, which includes such films as Life of Pi, Not Fade Away, Flight, Frances Ha, Holy Motors, Passion, and Hyde Park on Hudson. NYFF’s slate […]

read more...
NEXT PAGE  
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3