Netflix

Tye Sheridan in

Ever find yourself itching with the desire to plant your ass on the couch all day, but facing the dilemma that you can’t find anything in the endlessly scrolling Netflix menu worth watching? We’ve all been there. They don’t make it easy on us, do they? There’s no need to worry though, because there are actually always plenty of movies on Netflix well worth watching, and here we have a list of 18 of them that have either been added or re-added to the service (these things do tend to come and go, don’t they?) in recent months. Click on the titles to be taken to the films’ Netflix pages, where they can be easily added to your queue. You’ll thank yourself next time the concept of leaving your house and interacting with other humans seems unthinkable.

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Breaking Bad art by 100Sons

“I think Netflix kept us on the air.” Breaking Bad creator and executive producer Vince Gilligan said that in September at the Emmy Awards, referencing the struggles his show endured following its second season. On the same night that House of Cards became the first web-only show to win a Primetime Emmy award, Gilligan told Mashable that streaming services such as Netflix have ushered in a golden age of television, allowing audiences to consume their favorite shows at their own pace. His creation, the story of cancer-stricken chemistry teacher Walter White (Bryan Cranston) and his former student/partner Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul), now lives on Netflix in its entirety. As of Monday, one of modern television’s great dramas can be watched end-to-end on your favorite streaming device, on your schedule. As Mike once told Walter in season three, “No more half-measures.”

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Vintage Test Pattern

Television is no longer television. At least, what we think of as “television” is no longer confined to whatever your cable box or bunny ears spit out on the boxed screen that sits on your Swedish-made entertainment center or hangs on your wall (you swanky person, you). “Television” as we recognize it now seems to fall under the extremely large umbrella of “continuing stories that are not movies.” While some constraints remain relatively constant (most “television” won’t premiere in a movie theater, though damn if any number of film festivals, especially SXSW, are turning that on its head), other rules are becoming increasingly more flexible (you might be able to watch all of a show in one sitting, or see it via DVD before it even bows on a small screen near you). But if “television” is now the kind of thing you can watch on a phone or on a computer or on an actual television set and that comes to you by way of “networks” that are also no longer confined to the traditional terminology that encompasses “network,” what should we be calling it? We’ve got some ideas.

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Reality Bites

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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guardiansofthegalaxy

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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The One I Love

Speaking yesterday from his second home at Sundance, Mark Duplass was direct about the catalyst for his success: “Getting yourself into theaters is great. Getting a big VOD pop is great, but my first movie made a grand total of $220,000 in theaters but about 5 million people have seen it on Netflix because they can click on it and they can try it out. And so I really recommend to get your get goddamn movie on Netflix. It made my career.” It’s difficult to see the flaw in Duplass’ logic here, especially since most indie filmmakers would be thrilled to see any kind of distribution online, let alone on a platform that commands 34 million members. However, it could be a boon to the network itself, and Netflix would be wise to piggyback on the comments to tell indie filmmakers, “Get your goddamn movie on us.” Except more eloquently. Maybe less creepy.

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Netflix Envelope

Reading Felix Salmon’s downer article and searching for a classic mystery thriller has gotten me pessimistic about Netflix. Not about its future as a business, but as a user. As a movie fan. The core problem that we all know so well is that Netflix doesn’t have a lot of streaming options (hence the small crop that manifested from searching for classic mystery thrillers). The secondary problem, as Salmon points it: “As a result, Netflix can’t, any longer, aspire to be the service which allows you to watch the movies you want to watch. That’s how it started off, and that’s what it still is, on its legacy DVDs-by-mail service. But if you don’t get DVDs by mail, Netflix has made a key tactical decision to kill your queue — the list of movies that you want to watch. Once upon a time, when a movie came out and garnered good reviews, you could add it to your list, long before it was available on DVD, in the knowledge that it would always become available eventually. If you’re a streaming subscriber, however, that’s not possible: if you give Netflix a list of all the movies you want to watch, the proportion available for streaming is going to be so embarrassingly low that the company decided not to even give you that option any more. While Amazon has orders of magnitude more books than your local bookseller ever had, Netflix probably has fewer movies available for streaming than your local VHS […]

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wweNetwork

The rapid advancement of technology over the last decade has basically thrown the entire world of movie distribution into upheaval, so much so that it hasn’t looked like any of the confusion regarding the best way for movie studios to make money off their content libraries is going to get cleared up anytime soon. Back in the 80s and 90s things were easy. Your movie played in theaters for a while, it left theaters, and then it got put out on home video. With the advent of mobile devices, high speed data connections, streaming HD video, and all-you-can-eat subscription services, however, that simple model has been subverted. Now we’re living in a world where video stores are dead, DVD sales are plummeting, advertisers can’t rely on viewers watching TV shows as they first air, and it’s left all of the content creators out there scratching their heads, trying to figure out how they’re going to keep making money off of all the entertainment they’ve built their businesses creating. Well, everyone has been scratching their heads except for evil genius/Chairman and CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment, Vince McMahon, it seems. With the announcement of his company’s new content platform/subscription service, the WWE Network, he just may have come up with the right mix of intangibles to keep selling backbreakers and eye gouges to wrestling fans from here until the end of time. And he may have provided a business model that can keep all of the big media companies profitable in […]

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netflixbuffering

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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Thor: The Dark World

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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samsungtv

More than a few prognosticators have predicted in recent years that sometime soon going to see movies in theaters is going to be a thing of the past, and watching movies at home is going to be the standard of the future. Half of that viewpoint stems from the problems moviegoers have with poorly projected films and unruly patrons ruining their multiplex experiences, and the other half comes from the conveniences of having gigantic HD screens and digital content delivery available right in our homes. What sane person wants to pay theater prices to leave their house and have their movie interrupted by someone else’s cellphone when they can stay at home and watch the industry’s latest in crystal clear clarity, right from the comfort of the butt groove they’ve worked so hard to wear into their couch? Well, people who really love movies and the communal nature of moviegoing might, and there are a number of strategies that theaters can probably take to maintain their relevance moving ahead into the future, but let’s not jump into that argument today. Instead, let’s think about those ultra-fancy, ultra-convenient home theaters of the future, and try to get an idea of what they might eventually look like, thanks to recent innovations from two companies who are working hard to make sure that their offerings become staples of your future entertainment diet—Samsung and Netflix.

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Orange is the New Black

It wasn’t too long ago — just last year, in fact — that journalists and pundits started drafting Netflix’s eulogy. A Google search for the words “Netflix is doomed” reveals that many smart people thought the company would soon go the way of Blockbuster, becoming a fearsome industry giant only to have the rug pulled from under it. And then House of Cards happened, and Orange is the New Black after that. (If there are any other Netflix originals worth recommending, please discuss them in the comments.) A Netflix subscription became necessary to (legally) watch those buzz-worthy shows. With just a couple of hits — really, two seasons of TV — the former mailed-DVDs service became a network. But what’s noteworthy about Netflix’s continued success is the rapid emulation of the company’s business model by its competitors. Specifically, its practice of ponying up for a full season of TV without seeing a pilot — a situation Orange creator Jenji Kohan exploited to create one of the most diverse shows in the history of television to wide acclaim — has become such a game-changer that even broadcast networks are following suit. What can only follow is better TV, with writers enjoying an even greater sense of control and ownership over their works, though those writers will likely be small-screen veterans with a proven track record instead of up-and-comers who might be considered risky investments.

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Hollywood

All this week, Film School Rejects presents a daily dose of our favorite articles from the archive. Originally published in September 2011, Ashe Cantrell pulls back the curtain on the Hollywood conspiracy machine… You may already be a film industry cynic. Maybe you think Hollywood is a barren wasteland, devoid of creativity and originality. Maybe you’re sick of seeing talented people get ignored and vapid hacks get splashed all over the trades. Maybe you’re tired of 3D everything and having to re-buy your movies every five to ten years. I’m not here to dissuade you of any of that. Hell no, I’m here to make it worse. Get ready, because this is some of the rottenest shit of which the film industry is capable. These are the things so terrible that Hollywood has to cover them up, lest God see their sin and smite them accordingly (and keep various government entities and lawyers off their backs, of course). If you still had any kind thoughts toward Hollywood, I suggest you prepare yourself for crushing disappointment. But first, I’d like to give a very huge shout out and thank you to writers C. Coville and Maxwell Yezpitelok for their help on this article. You guys are great! And now back to the shit storm, already in progress:

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drewgoddard

There’s eventually going to come a day that Marvel Studios is going to make a hiring decision regarding their live action superhero properties that the geek community is going to disagree with. Fortunately for all of us, today is not that day, because a report out of The Wrap is saying that they’ve found the man they want to write their upcoming Daredevil series for Netflix, they’re currently in negotiations to get him signed to take the job, and—my god—they couldn’t have possibly picked a more perfect person to offer the gig to. Seeing as Daredevil is the most recognized and most loved of the four characters Marvel announced they were making 13-episode Netflix series for, his series was the one that was destined to get the most scrutiny, and his was the one that was going to have to recruit the most exciting name to pen the scripts in order for fan enthusiasm to continue to build rather than wane under the uncertainty of the creative direction the world’s reddest superhero would be going in. Well, taking those pressure into consideration, Marvel wasted no time in going out and getting the TV writer who has maybe the most nerd-cred of anyone with television experience right now—Drew Goddard.

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Marvel Please Stop

Marvel has a bit of a surprise for you. Not satisfied with storming onto ABC and bringing Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (and the upcoming Agent Carter) into households each week, the studio is now teaming up with Netflix for an unprecedented new deal to move to the small screen. Beginning in 2015, Marvel will develop four original shows focusing on Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist, and Luke Cage. After those wrap, the four series will lead to a cumulative miniseries event bringing together a re-imagined version of The Defenders. Though this may not directly be part of Marvel’s under-wraps plans for cranking out movies until 2021, it’s certainly a way to lay the foundation for their goal: to prove that they’re “more than the five characters and five franchises” featured in The Avengers. Here are four more notable Marvel characters, ready for duty on Netflix. Once that miniseries has concluded, how soon until the new movies begin filming?

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phones

While it’s not yet certain what the future of movie exhibition is going to look like, what’s more than certain is that it’s not going to continue looking the way it has for decades for very much longer. There’s currently a battle being waged over how movie fans are going to be able to watch the newest products being produced by studios, and it’s a battle that’s being fought on multiple fronts—whether by theater screen, by phone, or by set top box, the war to acquire the loyalty of our eyes and our ears is on. The two parties who have been making the most noise lately are the theater owners who have ran the various venues where we’ve spent our whole lives to this point watching the latest that Hollywood has to offer, and Netflix, whose digitally delivered, all-you-can-eat subscription model of movie consumption has already destroyed the concept of the video store and is looking to set its sights on the movie theaters next. Recently, Netflix CCO Ted Sarandos has been making a lot of noise about exhibition windows, which are the agreements that let theater chains exclusively exhibit all of the new studio releases for a certain amount of months before they can hit the various home video platforms. These exclusive deals are in large part what keeps the theater system financially viable, they’re a big way that studios are able to maximize profits on each of their releases, and Sarandos believes that they’re the biggest obstacle […]

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In Time Movie

Early this year, Nathan Harden wrote about a bubble on the verge of bursting, saying that “Big changes are coming, and old attitudes and business models are set to collapse as new ones rise. Few who will be affected by the changes ahead are aware of what’s coming.” He was writing about higher education and the migration of university curriculum’s to the web, but he could have just as easily been talking about the film industry and our relationship to it as viewers. The parallels — particularly the emerging dominance of schools releasing lecture content through online networks — are apt. Minus the “free” part, of course. We all know about Steven Spielberg’s prescient-sounding condemnation of the top-heavy studio structure, and it’s easy to imagine as we watch the landscape of studio offerings roll by with their capes in hand that a fundamental shift in focus has already happened, but Harden’s piece got me thinking not of the content being created, but the structure of the movie’s themselves. Specifically, the 2-hour average hero’s journey that represents the most-typical formula. Approximately a billion thinkpieces have been written on the internet’s encroachment into the stale-as-popcorn atmosphere of the movie theater, and they all come to the conclusion that something big is going to happen. My question is whether movies will be able to survive in their current form when that paradigm shift happens. My guess is that we’ll have to greatly expand what we think of when we think of “movies.”

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escape-bench

Yesterday a fight broke out over who is killing movie theaters. Throwing the first punch was Netflix chief content officer Ted Sarandos, who gave a keynote address at the Film Independent Forum in L.A. “I’m concerned that as theater owners try to strangle innovation and distribution, not only are they going to kill theaters, they might kill movies,” he said regarding the industry’s protest of VOD releases being day-and-date with theatrical openings. Soon after, National Association of Theatre Owners president/CEO John Fithian countered with a weak blow of: “Subscription movie services and cheap rentals killed the DVD business, and now Sarandos wants to kill the cinema as well.” As a former longtime employee of the movie theater industry, I can say with some certainty that the most lethal enemy of cinemas is cinemas themselves. Sure, there is a lot to say about the convenience of lazily staying home and clicking the remote on our cable box or Roku or Xbox or using our smarthphones or tablets to watch a brand new movie in our beds with no pants on. But at some point Fithian and the rest of NATO’s scapegoating curmudgeons need to realize that going to the movies isn’t necessarily about the movie on screen. It hardly has been for the better part of a century, in fact. Moviegoing is an experience. That’s what NATO should be focused on, and much of that focus will always be on pressuring its theater chain partners to maintain a better quality experience […]

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Charlie Hunnam

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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Space Jam

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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published: 04.18.2014
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published: 04.18.2014
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published: 04.18.2014
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published: 04.18.2014
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