MTV

Catfish

Last night, MTV premiered the second season opener of its erstwhile docu-reality series, Catfish, the television arm (fin?) of the tiny empire started by Catfish film star Nev Schulman that now swims unstoppably, improbably on. Like the eleven episodes before it that only focused on the couples caught in the net of Internet romance (we won’t count reunion episodes, because who would?), this episode is titled after its paramours – “Cassie and Steve.” Even if you’ve never watched Catfish, “Cassie and Steve” is a strangely prototypical episode of the show, one made season premiere worthy by its even more strangely heightened emotions and situations. Sure, Cassie is now in love with a guy from the Internet who she has never met in real life, but they are engaged. He doesn’t send her a lot of hot pictures, but they frequently have phone sex. He’s in the studio a lot because he’s a rapper/producer, but his songs sound totally amateur. Oh, and he came into Cassie’s life unexpectedly after a major traumatic event in her life. This sounds really, right? Guys? Right? Like most people who watch Catfish the show, I’m enthralled and flummoxed by the bare facts that 1) people continue to go on it, despite the fact that not a single episode has ended with both people on the other end of the modem (just go with it) being exactly who they’ve said they are and a true romantic connection that translates to the real world (a handful episodes […]

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Rebel Wilson

It’s hard to take any awards show seriously that gives away “awards” in such categories as “Best On-Screen Dirtbag,” least of all one that’s put together by MTV, but the network’s own MTV Movie Awards have now suddenly, stunningly proved their worth and relevance by picking Rebel Wilson to host their next kudos-giving shindig. The Aussie comedienne, show-stealer, and personal queen of my heart will take time out of her busy schedule of ass-kicking to host the awards in April, swiftly making the awards show a must-see event for anyone who likes things that are good and brash and funny. Wilson will next be seen in Pain & Gain (making the Michael Bay film still more awesome than it already looks) and is currently working on her brand new ABC sitcom, Super Fun Night. After the break, check out the announcement video, featuring Wilson shining bright like a diamond.

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Channel Guide - Large

MTV’s new raunchy, boy-teen series The Inbetweeners probably isn’t as dull as it appears to be. It’s probably a delightful little comedy that resonates with its intended demographic. What stops me from appreciating the show? It’s a remake of a British series and fails to match the edge or spirit of the original. This import is the latest in a recent string of scripted MTV fare that moves the network further away from whatever its format was when it was first launched (something about music? But really, who can remember that far back?) and the second British to North American remake—last year’s Skins was quickly axed after the Parents Television Council made a big stink about the depiction of teen sex. The Inbetweeners is a high school sitcom about four friends—lovelorn Simon, prim Will, loudmouth Jay, and himbo Neil. They’re all standing on the precipice of adulthood and floundering socially. The coming-of-age mischief is distinctly male, with all of their bawdy misconceptions about girls and sex and the all-too-common constant razzing being the crux of the show’s humor and appeal. In the first episode, the boys skip school because they think it will help them get laid (girls love rebels!) and relentlessly tease dimwitted Neil about his maybe-gay father. In theory, The Inbetweeners is a nice complement to MTV’s witty, female-centric comedy Awkward and a perfect addition to this channel for the teenage set. But two episodes have aired and so far it is practically a shot-for-shot copy of the […]

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Culture Warrior

The music video is in terminal condition, if not certainly dead. MTV hasn’t been associated with music for a long time, and nobody invests real money in the format that formerly revolutionized the relationship between audiences and musicians. The music video had a great run, introducing us to visionary directors and creating profound visual iconography whose power was unmatched by album covers and promotional materials, but beyond the occasional breakout video that circulates on YouTube, it’s time to say goodbye to the format that brought us everything from “Billy Jean” to “Frontier Psychiatrist.” In the past few years a new music/video hybrid has become increasingly prevalent. The “visual album” (as coined by Animal Collective) continues to emerge as a means of creative visual expression and (often) as a form of cross-promotion for an album. Unlike music videos, visual albums stage, sometimes with interruptions, the majority of a musician or band’s LP. Even though this format seems designed to exist exclusively through web distribution (visual albums can occasionally be too long, interconnected, and narratively or stylistically cohesive to be parsed out as standalone shorts or individuated music videos, but aren’t long enough to be feature films), the visual album is also a risky declaration in the age of iTunes, proclaiming albums to be cohesive works of musical artistry rather than conveniently divisible bits of audio information.

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Could the endless weeks of rampant speculation be over? Is it possible that we finally know what Brett Ratner’s next directing project after Hercules is going to be? Not necessarily, but Variety has some news on a new film that he’s definitely involved in as a producer, and that he might end up directing if things work out. His Rat Entertainment is in talks to adapt “I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Video Revolution,” a chronicle of the early days of MTV written by Craig Marks and Rob Tannenbaum. Ratner has earned a lot of criticism over the years due to his ADD directing style, but what better project for him to take on than a historical look back at the people who invented vapid, quick-cut nonsense? Factor in that the man’s last film, Tower Heist, was actually mostly unoffensive, and we may be at the beginnings of a Brett Ratner revolution. Especially now that he has all of that Oscar controversy behind him. Sure, we’re not yet certain that he’s going to end up directing this one, but it’s probably an easy bet that he’ll at least be in the room when they’re auditioning young actresses to play Nina Blackwood and Martha Quinn; so both this movie and the girls should end up with his fingerprints all over them.

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After viewing the premiere back in June, it seemed like MTV’s Teen Wolf had plenty of bark but lacked bite, but after seeing the season finale, I have a feeling that statement was made under a personal bias against the supernatural beings genre as a whole, because frankly, the finale was down right awesome. Part of my problem with media of this type – the CW, teen friendly, I-love-you-even-though-you’re-a-monstrous-killing-machine media – is that often times it lacks substance (I know, this coming from the dude with a hard on for Michael Bay). Usually it’s a cheesy, skin deep love story that revolves around a black hole of emotionless nothingness. There’s simply no reason to care about what happens to anyone. And in the first episode, Teen Wolf did have that problem. The very quickly forming romance between Scott and Allison was everything I can’t stand, and it just left a bad taste. But what made Teen Wolf eventually work is that the show grew beyond that romance. It offered more relationships that didn’t even revolve around its main character.

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Since last summer MTV has been slowly moving their way back into scripted television, something they stepped out of right around 2000. Their first attempt came in the form of the absolutely terrible The Hard Times of RJ Berger, this was followed by a remake of the hit British series Skins. Unfortunately, while a solid (but ultimately failed) attempt at a remake, the series was met with harsh backlash against its content. The backlash combined with the show’s poor ratings ultimately led to its cancellation this past week. Now here we are, saddled with the network’s latest attempt at scripted drama, Teen Wolf. This may be a re-imagining of the Michael J. Fox film from ’85, but the differences are major. MTV’s version is more of an adaptation in name only, and while the series is fraught with problems (many, many problems), it does show, much like Skins, that MTV is willing to grow on a creative level because this is the network’s best scripted series to date.

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Boiling Point

Apparently the MTV Movie Awards happened Sunday night. If this is something you care about, enjoy your summer break. It’s a big step to High School this fall. While perusing Twitter to see if anyone had retweeted the cool things I say (they hadn’t, because I don’t say cool things), I noticed a fair amount of people and peers complaining about the dominance of Twilight, which won a shit ton of awards alongside Harry Potter and Justin Bieber. I’m sure Hot Topic also unofficially won “Best Store.” There is a very simple way to view the MTV Movie Awards and MTV itself. Ask yourself this question: Am I 16 years old? If you answered ‘yes’ to this question, congratulations, go about your day. If you answered ‘no’ to this question and you spent more than 30 seconds thinking about the results of the movie awards, pour hot cocoa on your nipples – male or female, I don’t care. Do it. For the past twenty years, MTV hasn’t been relevant to anyone who isn’t 16 or the parent of a 16 year old, and that’s a travesty.

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Months back it was announced that MTV was putting a series into production that would serve as a remake/reboot of the Teen Wolf franchise of the eighties. Well today we get our first glimpse of the series in a three minute trailer courtesy of MTV themselves. So the first two minutes of this trailer suck. Really bad. I would actually put SyFy’s Being Human (which I do not like) above this. This trailer looks like a bad cross between Being Human, Skins and any generic sports film. That said, the final thirty seconds do contain some promise. It looks like the story picks up, and some action goes down with the main character and some badass looking hunters. So maybe it’s just a matter of getting past all the character and story introductions. This will be MTV’s third recent attempt at a scripted series following the atrocious Hard Times of R.J. Berger and their remake of SKINS. Like I’ve said before, at least MTV is trying to get more creative and I appreciate that. We will know more when the series premiers June 5th on MTV after the MTV Movie Awards.

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Boiling Point

Is that a provocative headline? I’m not sure. No more provocative than my first assignment from Neil Miller for FSR, “Why Blacks Don’t Deserve the Vote.” Just kidding, that wasn’t my first article, my first article was a review of The Pound Puppies on VHS. But really, that joke may be tasteless. Some people may be upset by it. You may run off and tell your friends not to read this article, or this site. By all means, go ahead and do that. Make sure to link them to the article too. So they can see it first hand. So that one article no one in your social group was going to read is now read by all of them. Do it. The more you send it around, the the more hits it gets and the more hits it gets the more Milk Duds I receive in compensation. There seems to be a bit of controversy over controversy these past weeks. Last week we had Ricky Gervais say some funny and mean things (the best kind of things) and people got upset. This week Judd Apatow stole that idea and said a lot of mean things that were barely funny (being just remakes of Ricky Gervais jokes) about the chubby Brit. We’ve also got some thick headed religious types protesting Red State because of its subject matter (I say only protest it if it sucks, or because Kevin Smith is a douche nozzle) and similar socially conservative people up in […]

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On Monday MTV premiered their latest play on the field of scripted dramas. The show is a remake of the popular U.K. show SKINS. The series follows the lives a group of teenagers who like to “explore” the boundaries of social behavior with everything from drugs to illicit sex. When it was announced that MTV was going to create an American version, it was met with less than stellar responses. People were convinced that the network was going to water down the show, and I’ll be honest, I felt this way too. But guess what, we were all wrong. Except for taking out the full frontal nudity and the many variations of the word “fuck,” the show is pretty much script for script the same program as its U.K. counterpart. And since it’s the same show, as you might imagine, it’s been met with the response worthy of such a vulgar series. Thanks to outrage from parents groups across the board, the fire the show lit under MTV was so bad that Taco Bell pulled their sponsorship of the series. But that’s not the part I take issue with. On Wednesday, The New York Times‘ Brian Stelter put out an article pointing out the fact that many executives and parents group alike are concerned with the possibility that the show violates child pornography laws. Let that sink in for a moment. A massive corporation (Viacom) thinks they quite possibly put out a product that may violate arguably one of the […]

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Is the MTV Movie Awards self-defeating? Probably. But does it make money off your 12 year-old? Definitely. And you didn’t even know you had a kid, did you?

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MTV, bane of all things music-related, is set to make its name that much more bafflingly obsolete by ordering up yet another series with no connection to what made the network unique to begin with.

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tyler_posey_header

The legacy of Michael J. Fox and Jason Bateman are about to be tarnished a bit by the Twilight movement. Or at least, that’s how the history books will remember it — if in fact, it makes it into the history books.

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bp-jerseyshore

Robert Fure gets teased by the tale of violence on MTV, then lashes out when he’s denied his blood lust.

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The Rocky Horror Picture Show

MTV, in their infinite wisdom, has decided to remake Rocky Horror. Why? I don’t know.

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published: 12.23.2014
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published: 12.22.2014
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published: 12.19.2014
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