Michelle Williams

Meek’s Cutoff hit the festival circuit hard and received a strong amount of praise for its visual style and its look at lives on the line in the desert of 1845 Oregon. Michelle Williams leads a fantastic cast including Paul Dano, Bruce Greenwood, Zoe Kazan, Neal Huff, and Will Patton in what appears to be Oregon Trail: The Movie if everything went wrong and you couldn’t trust the person you depended on the most. Check out the trailer for yourself:

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This article is part of our Oscar Week Series, where you will find breakdowns and predictions for all of the major categories. Some of you might be confused as to what the Best Actress category is exactly. Don’t worry; it’s easy enough to explain. You see, Best Actress is just like the award for Best Actor, except it’s for people with lady parts only. Why there needs to be a gender distinction when it comes to giving out awards for acting performances is beyond me. Is there something inherent in one of the genders that would give them the edge when it comes to acting? Or maybe this is a relic of an older Hollywood where all of the really meaty roles were written for men and actresses didn’t have much more to do than be the object of affection? I think we’re past that point now. I would argue not just that female actors put out work equal to male actors in 2010, but also that they were on the whole given more interesting characters to play. I say that this is the year where we need to band together and call for the end of award discrimination. Who’s with me? Maybe you should look over the nominees first. They are as follows, with my winner prediction in red.

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Culture Warrior

A few months back, a fight for free expression was exercised by the Weinstein Company for the Sundance-indie favorite Blue Valentine to be theatrically released with an R-rating instead of the dreaded NC-17. Many things about this pseudo-fight are nothing special: there’s hardly anything surprising about fights with the MPAA or about the Weinsteins making a fuss – it’s how they’ve succeeded in the business for decades. But this fuss, and the anti-MPAA lobbying contained within it, seemed significantly more justified because it was exercised in the name of potentially getting an exceptional indie into more theaters across the country (and while the film does star two recognizable names, it is, economically speaking, very much a truly modest indie of the classic Sundance variety). In the end, the Weinsteins got their way, and justifiably so. The NC-17 rating has become an economic form of censorship: nothing associated with the label, or the institution that bestows that label, has the power to actively stop distribution of NC-17 films, but because of the rating’s associations with sexually-explicit content, and because of the liability and extra measures required of theaters in preventing young people from sneaking their way into such films, many theaters (and some entire theater chains) will not exhibit films with such a rating. This would have relegated Blue Valentine, at best, to arthouse theaters in big cities. Such theaters are no doubt where Blue Valentine will play best regardless, but the key word here is opportunity – an R-rating provides […]

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Someone should sit down all the Nora Ephrons of the world to watch director Derek Cianfrance‘s Blue Valentine, preferably Clockwork Orange-style. The Ephrons in the film universe are like little girls who play with ponies and dream of beach-side weddings, living in a picketed and beautiful suburban house and having everything be absolutely perfect. The greatest conflicts in their films are the tragedies of a broken nail or whether or not the wedding dress will make the bride look slim. Those films are mannequins; they’re artificial on the outside and hollow on the inside. Cianfrance despises those films, or at least that’s the impression I got while talking to the honest man. Honesty is what he seems to care most about, including the harsher truths of life and love that we don’t see too often represented accurately on the big screen. This isn’t a film that felt like it was written by some teenage girl who just found out what love is from another Katherine Heigl rom-com, but instead made by someone tired of artificial love stories. Where’s the imperfection? Where are the dark times? That’s what Cianfrance is interested in: no fantasy.

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I’m declaring today officially Michelle Williams Day here on Film School Rejects. I doubt anyone will object, as Ms. Williams has been an object of our affection for quite some time. Above you see the first look at Williams as Marilyn Monroe in Simon Curtis’ My Week with Marilyn. She’s one of two top-level actresses who will play the iconic dame, the other being Naomi Watts. The film is currently shooting at Pinewood Studios and in and around London. It follows the story of Colin Clark, a 23-year old assistant who spent an uninhibited week with Monroe during her time working on The Prince and the Showgirl in 1956. As you can see, the first image of Williams accurately captures both the beauty and the distance that defined the look of Monroe. The wait for a first look at Naomi Watts’ Marilyn begins now. [via Coming Soon]

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Earlier today news broke that Blue Valentine, one of the critical darlings of this past year’s Sundance Film Festival, was slapped hard with an NC-17 rating by the 14th century progressives at the MPAA. The development is one that has brought shock to anyone who has seen the film, including yours truly, who reviewed it at the ‘dance in January. The offending scene, according to a report from Deadline Nacogdoches, is one that features a very awkward hotel room scene between Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams, who play a couple on the verge of watching their marriage erode away. The scene shows a last-ditch attempt for the formerly happy couple to save their relationship, delivering several moments that comprise the heart of the gut-wrenching tale. Cutting it in any way would be criminal. But the MPAA wants director Derek Cianfrance and The Weinstein Company (who acquired the flick at Sundance) to cut it down, it seems. Here’s hoping that doesn’t happen. In the mean time, the first trailer for the film’s fall theatrical release can be seen right after the jump.

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If this were a tabloid, the headline above would refer to a strange sex tape involving comedian Sarah Silverman and Christoph Waltz. However, being just slightly better than a tabloid, it refers to Silverman’s revelation that she’s done a nude scene for noted actor/director Sarah Polley (Away From Her). The scene is for Take This Waltz, a dramedy that also features Michelle Williams and Seth Rogen in lead roles. We reported on the odd acting pairing back in January, and it looks like they’ll be joined on screen by full frontal Silverman, a reality that Silverman claims, “is going to be awful. It’s so not pretty.” Silverman is known more for stand-up and for her television show, although she’s appeared in films like School of Rock. Still, it brings yet another strange dimension to an already interesting-sounding project. [Moviefone]

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Kevin Carr sits his chubbiness down weighs in on Shutter Island and the slate of Oscar-nominated short films, in theaters this week.

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There’s nothing more predictable going into Sundance than the fact that there will be some heavy drama. The only question is: will it be great, or will it be not-so-great? This time, it’s great.

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Michelle Williams to lower her standards from Ryan Gosling to Seth Rogen.

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Production Weekly is reporting this week that Michelle Williams (Wendy and Lucy, Brokeback Mountain) is in talks to play Marilyn Monroe in My Week with Marilyn. We find this interesting.

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The first trailer for Martin Scorsese’s upcoming thriller Shutter Island, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Ben Kingsley, has arrived online today. And I’ll be damned if it doesn’t bring some intense creepiness.

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Empire Magazine does an exclusive behind-the-scenes look at Shutter Island and catching the director and starring cast hard at work on location.

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FSR

Kevin Carr looks at The Day the Earth Stood Still, Nothing Like the Holidays, Slumdog Millionaire and Wendy and Lucy, in theaters this week with the FSR Report Card.

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Overall, this movie is something to envy of our friends in the major markets, to hope gets a wider release, and to impatiently wait for until the DVD comes out.

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Philip Seymour Hoffman and Charlie Kaufman on Synecdoche, New York

When you think about Charlie Kaufman, you aren’t going to be thinking about movies that are simple, or easy to understand when taken at face value. But for those paying attention to his work, they know that it is often brilliant.

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Look Out! Huge Jackman Is Trying to Decieve You!

If you want a film to have this many twists, it’d be best to not name the movie Deception. That would be like naming Citizen Kane something like It’s a Sled or renaming Psycho with Norman Bates is the Killer Who Dresses Like His Dead Mother.

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Drink In Michelle Williams and Huge Jackman

Enjoy this drinking game, and you might be wearing the goggles that turn someone like me into Huge Jackman.

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Hugh Jackman, Michelle Willams and Ewan McGregor in Deception

Deception is a sexy, intriguing thriller that features the acting talents of Hugh Jackman and Ewan McGregor. It also features the alluring tandem of Michelle Williams and Maggie Q.

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Heath Ledger

Heath Ledger’s out-of-date will could have caused problems, but it appears that it will not.

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published: 11.21.2014
D
published: 11.21.2014
B+
published: 11.19.2014
C+
published: 11.19.2014
B-, C


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