Melissa George

Triangle 02

Take a look at any list of movies dealing with autism — we tend to get them around this time, as yesterday was World Autism Awareness Day and April is National Autism Awareness Month — and you’ll never see Christopher Smith‘s Triangle alongside such serious titles as Rain Man, Temple Grandin and the documentary Refrigerator Mothers. Maybe it’s just not well-known enough, although the terribly under-seen Snow Cake (featuring Sigourney Weaver’s greatest performance) is on those lists, and it’s even more obscure. The problem for Triangle is likely to do with its autistic character getting so little screen time. The movie is not about autism or autistic persons on the surface, like those mentioned above. However, there is an argument for the whole thing being representative of an autistic mind. Occasionally filmmakers attempt to depict disorders narratively in the form of metaphorical plots. We’ve seen one that ended up taking place completely inside the head of a man with dissociative identity disorder (aka multiple personality disorder), yet that particular movie is a little too direct in what it’s doing (I’d name it, but I guess that’d be totally spoiling it for anyone who hasn’t seen it). Triangle, on the other hand, might not even be intentionally figurative. Even for a mind-fuck mystery thriller, it’s spawned a lot of discussions and theories about what’s really going on in the story of a woman stuck in a murderous time loop during a sailing excursion, but only a few touch on the idea that […]

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For some people the great outdoors doesn’t get any more frightening than the 1988 Dan Aykroyd/John Candy film, but genre fans know that nature is filled with all manner of deadly terrors. From animals out to feast on your flesh to hillbillies out for the same (after they rape you of course) to the raw danger inherent in rough weather and terrain, the outdoors will kill you if given half the chance. The odds of survival grow even slimmer when you toss highly talented and motivated killers into the mix. A Lonely Place to Die sends five friends on a hiking and climbing trip in the Scottish mountains, but when they find a young Eastern European girl buried alive in the woods their collective vacation takes a turn for the nightmarish. The good Samaritans try to get her back down the mountain to the safety of town, but they quickly find themselves targeted by the two professional killers responsible for her captivity. What goes up must come down… some faster, harder, and deader than others.

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The Scottish highlands are without doubt one of the most beautiful places on earth. In my mind, they are inexorably linked to Christopher Lambert’s Connor MacLeod and the Highlander series. There can be only one! While it may induce some snickers as audience members recall the TV series and sing the intro song in their heads, the Scottish highlands are the perfect setting for Julian Gilbey’s new film A Lonely Place to Die. A group of five friends take a vacation to hike and rock climb through the Scottish highlands. Their fun is cut short when they discover a young Serbian girl being held captive in the woods. Trying to save her, the inadvertently embark a new, more dangerous outdoor adventure. When the girl’s captors discover her missing, they begin hunting for her and those who uncovered their secret. With mercenaries sent by the girl’s father on their way for the ransom exchange, a deadly game of cat and mouse ensues.

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First Look Studios has provided us with an exclusive clip from their upcoming release Triangle…

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Well, it’s Halloween, and there are scant few horror films in the theaters. However, films like Things We Lost in the Fire and The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford are scarier than anything else on the screen because they’re bore you to death. We can’t help you with boredom from Oscar bait, but we can help ease the pain from Alaskan vampires.

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Here is something new for all of the gentlemen (and some of the ladies), courtesy of the Fat Guys at the Movies. If you are in any way offended by gratuitously hot women from the world of cinema, please move on to something more appropriate. We would recommend our own Kevin Carr’s review of Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married?. Trust us, it’s a scorcher.

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Actress Melissa George called 30 Days of Night director David Slade a “modern-day Hitchcock.” We’ll say this: he did make one intense, scary ass flick.

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published: 11.21.2014
D
published: 11.21.2014
B+
published: 11.19.2014
C+
published: 11.19.2014
B-, C


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