Logan Lerman

Columbia Pictures

It wasn’t too long ago that war films painted their characters as clear-cut heroes and villains belonging solely to one side or the other, but by the time the darkness of the Vietnam War settled over America the movies discovered the muddy morality that exists in the real world. Our patriotic heroes could have flaws, and our mortal enemies could exhibit a recognizable humanity. The whites and blacks of the past are today’s grays, and what was once a revelation — that good guys can be troubled, weak and filled with doubt — is now the norm. Basically if you’re going to make a war movie it better be packed with more than a squad of morally challenged soldiers. Fury, the new film from writer/director David Ayer that leaves his precious Los Angeles streets behind in favor of the blood-soaked fields and shell-shocked towns of World War II Germany, takes those now familiar character staples and drops them into a far less common environment — the inside of a lumbering but deadly M4 Sherman tank. Sgt. Don Collier (Brad Pitt) and his four-man tank crew have been together for a long time, but their latest battle leaves their rumbling beast damaged and one of the men dead. They pick up a green replacement (Logan Lerman) and head back into the fray, but as the war and the men’s time in it winds down the new recruit is forcibly brought up to speed by a crew as hollowed-out as the tank in […]

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review percy jackson 2

Of all the young adult (YA) franchise starter wannabes that have graced the big screen only to disappear into obscurity, Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief is probably not the one you’d expect or want to get a sequel. (That honor goes to this year’s Beautiful Creatures, a conclusion I’m sure all twelve people who paid to see it in theaters would agree with.) But box office is a global game now, so when Percy and his friends grossed $226M on a $95M budget the sequel got the green light envied by so many others. But where the first film had a massive, Harry Potter-sized marketing campaign, a Potter director in Chris Columbus and a non-Potter shirtless Pierce Brosnan, the follow-up would have to make do with somewhat less. Namely a smaller budget, a director named Thor, and a bespectacled Anthony Head. After realizing his identity as the son of Poseidon in the first film, Percy Jackson (Logan Lerman) is now firmly ensconced in the world of the half-bloods and remains something of a legend at the fat camp where all of the twenty-something kids hang out and train for the Hunger Games. When a giant mechanical bull breaks through the magical wall surrounding camp it sets Percy on a quest for the only thing that can save them all, the legendary Golden Fleece. Together with Grover (Brandon T. Jackson) the satyr, Annabeth (Alexandra Daddario) the eye model, and Tyson (Douglas Smith) the surprise step-brother who can only see the world […]

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percyjackson

Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief had all the pieces in place to become the successor to the wildly successful Harry Potter franchise. It had a wide-eyed young protagonist (Logan Lerman), a bunch of mythical creatures, and even the same director (Chris Columbus) who successfully launched the Harry Potter franchise. While it didn’t quite become the cultural phenomenon that Harry Potter did, Percy Jackson did manage to make a good chunk of money—especially overseas—so now they’re going to try their hand at a sequel. A sequel that, from the looks of how much its scope has expanded, the studio is continuing to pin financial hopes on. This time around Columbus has handed the directing baton over to Diary of a Wimpy Kid helmer Thor Freudenthal, and if this trailer for the new film is any indication, his Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters is going to be relying on a snappier title, beloved-by-nerds actors from Joss Whedon shows, and especially huge summer spectacle in order to build on the foundation laid by The Lightning Thief and bring in even more box office dollars.

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trailer writers

Been itching to see a movie about introspective creative types? Then Millennium Entertainment has the film for you. It’s called Writers, and it stars the always likable Greg Kinnear as the patriarch of a broken family who all fancy themselves to be authors. As you might imagine, that means they’re all pretty bad with other human beings and relationships and whatnot, and they’re far too sensitive to make it in such an unforgiving world, so their lives are filled with all sorts of delicious drama. Don’t worry about things getting too heavy though… this is a movie, not real life, and poignant lessons about love and togetherness take the place of a head in an oven. But maybe you’re not looking for a movie about introspection. Maybe you’re looking for a movie that casts Lily Collins and Jennifer Connelly as an almost creepily pretty-in-the-same-way mother/daughter duo, or a movie that has Kristen Bell jogging around in a sports bra. Well, as you can see from its new trailer, Writers has that too. Aren’t you in luck?

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commentary-wallflower

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is the story of Charlie (Logan Lerman), a teenager struggling to fit in with those around him (including Emma Watson and Ezra Miller) while also dealing with traumatic memories from his past. It’s a rare film in that it manages to be very personal even as it speaks to so many people. The disc contains two commentaries, one with writer/director Stephen Chbosky and another with six cast members plus Chbosky. I watched the film twice, back to back, with each of the commentaries, and the combination of experiencing it (mostly) free of dialogue, where actors’ expressions and the film’s editing tells the story while the creative team explores what the film meant to them has altered the movie for me in a profound way. I liked but didn’t love it upon first viewing, but as someone who watches way too many movies I know that sometimes a re-watch under different circumstances or in a different frame of mind can have a dramatic effect on how you receive a film. The fact that it happened to me while watching with the commentary track on is a definite first for me though. Keep reading to see what I heard with this week’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower Commentary Commentary…

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The Perks of Being a Wallflower Review

In attempting to write a review for Stephen Chbosky‘s cinematic adaptation of his own novel of the same name, The Perks of Being a Wallflower, I ran into a problem (a problem big enough that I’d feel the need to use frequent “I” statements in said review, a big no-no in my book). It’s impossible for me to write a review of Perks that would, in any way, be able to masquerade as an objective take on the material (and, of course, no review is ever wholly objective, and you’d do well to remember that straight away), because Chbosky’s book made an indelible mark on me as a teenager, one that I’ve never been quite able to shake. Chbosky’s book was published on February 1, 1999. I got a copy of the book as a gift from my first boyfriend about two weeks later. For those of you not keeping track on my personal biography, I was fifteen in the winter of 1999, a sophomore in high school who, though lucky enough to have a ton of friends and great parents and good grades, still felt a bit awkward (being a bookworm and a movie buff and a modern art freak didn’t help — these weren’t cool things to be, yet). I’ll stop you there — yes, everyone felt awkward in high school, but the experience of being a teenager is a profoundly insular one, so most of us don’t know (often for quite some time) that everyone else felt […]

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While it’s seeming more and more possible that Darren Aronofsky won’t make the wish of flood enthusiasts everywhere come true by casting someone to play a giant wave or two (or three, or four…) in his Noah, he’s making up for that hideous oversight with a stellar cast that so far includes Russell Crowe, Saoirse Ronan, Douglas Booth, Logan Lerman, Emma Watson, Ray Winstone, and (probably) Jennifer Connolly – a litany of talents that he’s just rounded out with no less than Sir Anthony Hopkins. Aronofsky himself announced the news this morning via his Twitter, in a tweet that reads: “i’m honored to be working with the great sir anthony hopkins. we just added him to the stellar cast of ‪#Noah‬. ‪#methuselahlives‬” Methuselah lives! Hurray! Wait, who is Methuselah again?

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Darren Aronofsky‘s epic Noah continues to fill out, with Deadline Woodland Hills now reporting that Emma Watson is in talks to come on board the project as the love interest, Ila, of one of Noah’s (Russell Crowe) sons. The outlet reports that Ila will develop “a close relationship” with Douglas Booth‘s character, Shem. There’s a bit of confusion here, as Deadline’s post about the casting (which we reported earlier this week) indicated that Logan Lerman‘s Ham would be the one receiving a love interest, and this news says that it will in fact be Booth who will get the girl. Weirdly enough, this might not be a case of Deadline screwing up which son is which – different versions of the Noah story actually mix up the order of the sons (there’s even another one, Japheth), and that could certainly be a part of the problem. And that’s about as far as my lapsed Catholicism can take me on this one. The film is still in need of both a wife and a nemesis for Noah.

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Darren Aronofsky‘s Biblical epic Noah has been through enough chatter over the years to sink even the heartiest of souls, so it’s high time the filmmaker buckled down and began casting the rest of the film’s roles beyond just Russell Crowe as Noah. Just in the interest of getting this ship on the water and all. Deadline Las Vegas reports that Logan Lerman and Douglas Booth are now on board to play Noah’s sons. Lerman will be the oldest, Ham, with Booth taking on the younger role of Shem. This means we’re still in need of some feminine wiles – the boys need a mom and Noah needs a wife (Jennifer Connelly continues to be the name that comes up most often when it comes to this particular role), and Ham apparently gets a love interest (supposedly a “great role” for an up-and-coming young actress). The outlet also reports that, despite earlier chatter, Liam Neeson will not be playing Noah’s “nemesis” in the film. I never really pictured him as raging floodwaters either. That role is also still up for grabs.

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After his break-out performance in We Need to Talk About Kevin, it looked as if Ezra Miller would be permanently doomed to creeper status, haunting the edges of our collective cinematic nightmares forever, so I was predictably cagey about his casting as Patrick in Stephen Chbosky‘s The Perks Of Being A Wallflower. Author Chbosky has adapted his own (beloved) novel for the film (which he also directs), and while so much of the film’s other casting – namely Logan Lerman as protagonist Charlie – seemed spot-on, Miller bothered. Patrick is one of the first people who makes Charlie feel accepted in high school – a profound feat once you’re aware of how much young Charlie has already endured and how much Patrick himself is going through – and Miller hasn’t previously seemed to be the type of actor who could pull off such a kind-hearted character. Wrong. In the first trailer for Perks, Miller steals the show as Patrick – he’s hilarious, zingy, vibrant, and about as far removed from his We Need to Talk About Kevin character as humanly possible. Everyone else looks totally radical, too (after all, the book is set in the ’90s), but Miller is the main attraction here. Check out the first trailer for The Perks Of Being A Wallflower after the break!

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This week, Fat Guy Kevin Carr dresses up in a frilly lace cravat and some leather boots, grabs his sword and takes a trip to France to become a Musketeer. Unfortunately, he seems to be almost 400 years too late for those kinds of shenanigans. So he hops the English Channel to become a spy with MI-7. Of course, no one told him that MI-7 was actually nothing more than propaganda. So he heads back home for a good night’s sleep, and to make sure that happens, he videotapes himself throughout the house. While he doesn’t witness any paranormal activity, there are many unspeakable things that can be seen on them.

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When I first heard that a new version of The Three Musketeers was being made by Paul W.S. Anderson I initially thought that he was a bad choice for the material, that he would just end up making something ridiculous. Now that I’ve actually seen the movie, I’m certain that he was a bad choice for the material, because he did in fact make something ridiculous. You know this story by now, it’s been around for like 175 years or something, so too much plot summary probably isn’t necessary. There are three famous Musketeers, the king’s personal soldiers, Athos (Matthew MacFayden), Porthos (Ray Stevenson), and Aramis (Luke Evans). They used to be big time, but now they’re out of a job because a corrupt Cardinal (Christoph Waltz) is taking control of France and instituting his personal guard as the new power in the nation. Also there’s a young chap name D’Artagnan (Logan Lerman) who has traveled to Paris to become a Musketeer, but he finds the place in disarray. Backstabbings and power plays commence. But let’s get back to how bad most everything in this movie is. The most egregious of all the offenses this new Three Musketeers commits is the punishment it doles out to its characters in the form of horrible dialogue. Never have you come across a script with more hackneyed, generic movie clichés than this. Everything that comes out of the characters’ mouths is clunky and unnatural. It feels like the movie went through absolutely zero […]

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Ambitious. Bold. Serious. Groundbreaking. None of these words can be sanely used to describe the vibe emanating from the trailer for Paul W.S. Anderson’s “adaptation” of The Three Musketeers. This a W.S. Anderson picture through and through. This trailer does a fantastic job at selling a future camp classic in the making, and I don’t even mean that in an ironic way, either.

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Despite the fact that this series is all about characters from Mount Olympus, Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Sea of Monsters is looking to Thor for direction. Close enough, I guess it’s all mythology. When I first heard that a series about a boy with magic powers who discovers that he has a very interesting ancestry, which was once helmed by Chris Columbus, was going to continue with another sequel I got confused. Wasn’t Harry Potter supposed to be over? Okay, obvious joke, but it was pretty pathetic how closely Columbus and the marketing people on the first Percy Jackson tried to tie this already derivative sequel to the Harry Potter franchise aesthetically. Hopefully, with a new director on, this second film can go in a new direction. But seeing as how Thor Freudenthal’s previous work on films like Hotel for Dogs and Diary of a Wimpy Kid doesn’t share much with these tween fantasy series, it’s kind of hard to tell if he’s the right man to give this series its own sense of identity. I guess the best we can hope is that he has some mode other than “movie you would see on the Disney Channel on a Sunday afternoon,” which is all I’ve seen from him so far. What we do know about this new film is that Logan Lerman is once again signed to star as Percy, and the story follows the pursuits of Percy and a group of his friends as they seek […]

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Percy Jackson and 3:10 to Yuma actor Logan Lerman is attached to a new indie film whose title takes inspiration from a Simon and Garfunkel tune. The young actor is ready to start production this fall on The Only Living Boy in New York, a sort of coming of age, romantic triangle, boy coming to grips with the imperfection of his parents movie that is set to be directed by Seth Gordon, the man who made the universally beloved documentary The King of Kong, and who has recently been busying himself directing episodes of great TV comedies like Parks and Recreation, Modern Family, and Community. The reason the new film won’t likely start until fall is that Lerman is starting to become something of a hot ticket item over there in the Hollywood. Not only does he have a round of publicity coming up for his big summer blockbuster version of Three Musketeers, but he’s also about to start production on an adaptation of the ridiculously successful Stephen Chbosky teen angst novel, The Perks of Being a Wallflower. It looks like Lerman is subscribing fully to the Give Them an Action Movie/Give Them an Indie Drama model of career building. He may be one to keep an eye on. Source: Deadline State College

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So, Percy Jackson and The Olympians: The Lightning Thief wasn’t exactly the Harry Potter killer that Fox wanted it to be (but Percy Jackson vs Harry Potter could be a ridiculously cool movie). Still, they are moving forward with a sequel subtitled The Sea of Monsters – based on the second book by Rick Riordan in the series. According to the LA Times, virtually none of the creative personnel is back, but director Chris Columbus will magically turn into a producer, Karen Rosenfelt will magically stay on as producer, and writer partners Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski will write the screenplay (using no magic at all). Essentially, even though The Lightning Thief made $226 million worldwide, the film cost something near $100 million and made only $88 million domestically. The numbers weren’t clear indicators that the studio wanted to take on a sequel. Something has changed their mind, though. This might shoot as early as this Summer, but there’s no word on what part of the cast will return. It’s possible that this final decision was partially hinging on whether Logan Lerman got the Spider-Man gig, and now that he’s free for the Summer, he can come out and throw lightning bolts at monsters in the sea. That’s speculation, but if you’ve read this far, you’ll realize that the brunt of this story is “Average Young Adult Adventure Gets Seemingly Unwarranted Sequel,” and that doesn’t fly well on its own.

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A month ago, we reported on the short list of young talent that Sony was eying for their reboot of Spider-Man. All in all, the list was fairly average. There were no stand outs in particular, but all of them would be passable as the web-slinger. Jamie Bell, Alden Ehrenreich, Andrew Garfield, Frank Dillane, and Josh Hutcherson are basically the same actor with different haircuts. At least Sony knows what they want. The news today being passed around the horn is that…there is no news.

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Judging by the list of names released today, Paul W.S. Anderson has never read The Three Musketeers.

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Everyday, the internet will be bringing you another name on a list of possible names that might or might not play Peter Parker. But does that really even matter?

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Logan Lerman

Drew McWeeny over at Hit Fix broke the news today that Sony Pictures has pretty much locked in Percy Jackson star Logan Lerman as their Peter Parker in the Spider-Man reboot. It marks another step in a big change for the Spider-Man franchise. A big change that was spurred on by the failures of Sam Raimi.

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