Like Father Like Son

Masaharu Fukuyama in

August is hot and sticky, to the point where many days it gets too uncomfortable to go outside even after the sun has gone down. That’s where a reliable air conditioner and a Netflix account come in handy. There’s bound to be at least a couple days out of this month where you just want to draw the shades, crank up the AC and avoid the sun. But what movies to stream while you’re in seclusion? Start with this list of new additions to the service, which are all worth a look. As always, click on the films’ titles in order to be taken to their Netflix page, where you can add them to your My List.

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Cannes Film Festival Jury Prize winner and Palme d’Or runner-up Like Father, Like Son is getting the remake treatment from Steven Spielberg and DreamWorks. The Japanese film, from director Hirokazu Kore-eda, is the story of a family that discovers their six year-old son is not theirs at all; he was switched at birth with their biological son in the hospital. They, along with the parents of the other child, must now deal with the impossible – do they give up the child they’ve been raising as their own and take back their biological son, or do they keep quiet and pretend nothing happened? “When I saw the film at Cannes, I was so impressed by its power to bring such a human story to the screen. Here at DreamWorks Studios, Stacey and our team recognized that it was a story we wanted to remake to bring to our audiences throughout the world,” said Spielberg in a statement. “I thank Hirokazu Kore-eda and Fuji TV for giving us this once in a lifetime opportunity.” Spielberg will not be directing the film, nor has he announced who will nab that role. Kore-eda will still have involvement though, in some capacity, as he stated that he’s looking forward to working with Spielberg.

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Cannes 2013

The Cannes Film Festival is all wrapped up for another year; the awards have been given out, and pundits are busy working out what’s going to go the distance in the coming awards season, and what will fall by the wayside. In my first time at Cannes, I managed to watch 41 films, including all 20 films In Competition, and have arrived at the 10 films that I feel were the best of show. Put simply, these are ones to watch out for:

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Three-hour lesbian drama Blue is the Warmest Color was announced the winner of the prestigious Palme d’Or at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival, a choice that many foresaw as likely but not a sure thing. The jury that awarded the honor was led by Steven Spielberg and also included Nicole Kidman, Ang Lee, Christoph Waltz and Lynne Ramsay. For the second place Grand Prix winner, they picked the latest from the Coen Brothers, Inside Llewyn Davis, while for Jury Prize (considered the third biggest deal) they chose Hirokazu Kore-eda‘s Like Father, Like Son. Like Father, Like Son was also recipient of an honorable mention from the Christian-based Ecumenical Jury, whose top prize went to The Past — the star of which, Bérénice Bejo, was named Best Actress by the main Cannes jury. Blue is the Warmest Color also earned multiple honors from the fest, taking the critic choice FIPRESCI Award for the In Competition category. The biggest surprise of today’s announcement seems to be Spielberg and Co.’s naming of Bruce Dern as Best Actor for the new film from Alexander Payne, Nebraska. After the jump, you can find a full list of main jury winners (from the festival website) and other honorees announced over the weekend accompanied by links to our review of the film where available.

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Like Father, Like Son is a film almost guaranteed to have gone down well with this year’s head of the In Competition jury, Steven Spielberg, what with its shared focus on riveting drama concerning an increasingly destabilising family unit. For all of the visual pizzazz of Spielberg’s blockbusters, his films almost always return to matters of the family, and as such, it’s easy to see how the latest offering from I Wish director Kore-ada Hirokazu would very much appeal to his sensibilities if not also those of the rest of the jury. Nonoyima and Midori are a certifiably middle-upper class couple who have provided a life of privelige for their 6-year-old son, Keita. However, early on they are summoned to the hospital in which he was born and informed that, in fact, Keita is not their son; he was somehow switched with another at birth. They soon enough meet the parents of the other child, the Saikis, who have in effect been raising their biological son for the last 6 years. Inevitably, the question of what to do rears its head: maintain the status quo, or return the sons to their rightful parents?

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