Liam Neeson

Hugh Laurie

What is Casting Couch? Today it’s mostly concerned with the comings and goings of British actors, but we also let Lea Seydoux slip in there because she’s wonderful. So far the only things we know about Brad Bird’s super-secretive upcoming film, Tomorrowland, are that George Clooney is going to be starring as a character who may or may not be Walt Disney and, though the film is said to be in the vein of Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind, it may or may not have something to do with aliens. That’s not a lot to go on. But now we at least know that the film’s story is going to involve a villain of some sort, because Heat Vision is reporting that Hugh Laurie is currently in negotiations to join this film as the bad guy. So, what do you imagine that means? Is Laurie playing an alien? A rival theme park owner? Are any of the things we think we know about this movie actually correct at all?

read more...

Liam Neeson

Liam Neeson seems intent on making money off his somewhat-newly-minted role as Hollywood’s Only Action Star, as Deadline Hollywood reports that the actor has now signed on to star in the Brad Ingelsby-penned Run All Night. Warner Bros. is also reportedly negotiating with with director Jaume Collet-Sera to helm the project. Neeson and Collet-Sera are currently filming Non-Stop together, that Neeson-as-air-marshal actioner that sounds like a ton of fun, though obviously the merits of the resulting project remain to be seen. The real fly in the ointment? The lackluster Unknown, the pair’s first team up from 2011, which disappointed audiences eager to embrace a post-Taken Neeson. As long as they don’t bring Unknown co-star January Jones on board for Run All Night, we should be just fine. The story of Run All Night seems to be relatively straightforward, so hopefully it’s got some tricks up its sleeve. Neeson will star as “a mob hitman who, in a single night, is forced to take on his former boss. The guy has to protect his son and family, and winds up on the run from the mob and the authorities with his estranged son.” Sounds kind of basic, but fun, and just the type of project that Neeson can make his own.

read more...

A Look Back at the Cinematic Facial Hair of 2012

The movies released in 2012 have been notable for many reasons, impacting or reflecting news events both positively and negatively. It’s also seen new innovations, the most notable being the first release of a film in 48 frames per second. However, cinematic historians will also look back on 2012 as being a banner year for facial hair. The entire crew of Film School Rejects relishes glorious facial hair (and yes, that also includes the ladies on staff). We all wish we could have half the style that characters in the movies this year displayed on their lips, chins and cheeks. Now, as the year draws to a close, we reminisce on the many styles we’ve seen on movie screens in 2012, and maybe give some tips on how to grow your own face so glorious.

read more...

The Grey

As was rumored last week, Joe Carnahan‘s The Grey will be getting a brief and limited theatrical re-release later this week in order to allow the Liam-Neeson-punches-wolves-and-stuff-and-also-you-cry extravaganza to get a late-breaking awards season push. Why anyone would not already have Neeson down as a lock for Best Wolf-Punching Performance of the Year is unknown, but hey, attention spans are short in Hollywood. Caranhan confirmed the news via his Twitter, tweeting out: “Guys, December 7th ‘THE GREY’ begins a two week run at the Laemmle Santa Monica theatre & the Laemmle Town Center, Encino. GET THE WORD OUT!” As our pals over at /Film note, the film is already on both DVD and Netflix (it was released nearly a year ago, after all), but if you’re not interested in seeing Liam Neeson fight a wolf with his bare hands and broken bottles on the big screen, I’m not sure what you could possibly be interested in. Also, now you can see The Grey and Flight in theaters back-to-back for one hell of a double feature, one that will guarantee you won’t want to fly anywhere, possibly ever again.

read more...

Bill Murray at Cannes 2012

What is Casting Couch? It’s the casting roundup that’s got news about what weird, clown-related thing Peter Stormare is going to do next. Read on for the juicy details. If your name is Dan Aykroyd or Ivan Reitman, then Bill Murray has been spending the last ten years or so trying to convince you that he doesn’t read scripts. That’s got to sting, because Deadline has a new report that proves this to be balderdash. Murray read Ted Melfi’s script for St. Vincent De Van Nuys and identified with the writer’s work so much that he called him up and invited him out for a drive. One negotiating process later and Murray is reportedly ready to sign on to star in the film, which is about a cantankerous old coot who bonds with a twelve-year-old boy over rounds of drinking, gambling, and generally despicable behavior. Sounds like it’s going to be a hoot.

read more...

What is Casting Couch? Today it’s proof that if you star in something about sexy young vampires, you will continue to get more work. Warner Bros.’ Lego movie already had names like Chris Pratt, Elizabeth Banks, Will Arnett, and Morgan Freeman signed for its voice cast, thus making a stupid-sounding idea suddenly seem promising, but now they’ve really gone and made Lego into a movie that you can start looking forward to. Deadline reports that the film has just added Will Ferrell to its cast as the bad guy, President Business, Liam Neeson as the bad guy’s main henchman, Bad Cop, Parks and Rec’s mustachioed Nick Offerman as a revenge-obsessed pirate, and Community’s cheery-voiced Disney Princess Alison Brie as a member of the protagonist’s team who holds a powerful secret. That may just be the weirdest/most fun cast ever assembled, and it almost makes up for the fact that the movie is going to be in 3D.

read more...

When will criminals learn to leave Liam Neeson alone? As Taken 2 illustrated, the lesson illustrated in Taken was well illustrated: human traffickers are no match for Neeson’s temper. If these fools insist on trifling with this (particularly) surly Irishman, they will only end up with a screwdriver in the skull to go with the vengeance in their hearts. I mean screwdriver in the figurative sense of course, because it’ll actually be a hammer. Now there’s talk of a Taken 3, which took everyone outside the accounting department by surprise. Still, we wondered what was possibly left for these covetous rapscallions to take that would send Neeson over the edge. So we came up with a few options.

read more...

Taken 2

Pierre Morel’s 2009 hit Taken was an unexpectedly pleasant surprise on several levels. It turned the 56-year-old Liam Neeson into a legitimate action star, it re-framed the idea of January being a dumping ground for Hollywood leftovers and best of all, it was damn entertaining in its ridiculous simplicity. Its box office take guaranteed a sequel, but what should have been a sure thing was instead kneecapped by co-writer/franchise-creator Luc Besson‘s decision to hand the reins to the awesomely named  but otherwise utterly incompetent Olivier Megaton. In the sequel, ex-CIA agent and current bodyguard Bryan Mills (Neeson) finally has the relationship with his daughter Kim (Maggie Grace) and ex-wife Lenore (Famke Janssen) that he’s so desperately craved. An upcoming protection gig in Istanbul seems like the ideal locale for a “family” vacation so the ladies surprise Mills after his assignment for some Turkish R&R. But they’re not the only members of the surprise committee.

read more...

Taken 2

Few people have looked quite so uncomfortable talking about YouTube and Tweeting as Liam Neeson does as he intros and outros this new trailer for Taken 2. But don’t tell him I said that. Everything in between reminds us that Neeson is not the kind of guy you should be messing with. He’s still got his particular set of skills. He’s still without a great deal of money. And now he’s got more trouble, because he’s the one being taken. Thus, the title of the film… Get it?

read more...

Taken 2

The thesis statement of Taken 2 seems to hold that once you’ve dipped your toe into the criminal world, you’ve entered a murky swamp with an undercurrent that’s just going to keep pulling you deeper down into depravity. When Liam Neeson’s daughter got snatched up by kidnappers in the first Taken, he didn’t handle things by going to the proper authorities, he handled them by tracking the kidnappers down and brutally murdering them one at a time until he got her back. If you’ll remember, it was completely awesome. But it turns out all of those people he killed had families – criminal families – and now they’re out for revenge. In this trailer for Olivier Megaton’s Taken 2, it’s not just the daughter that gets taken, it’s the entire family. So Neeson is going to have to fight extra hard, he’s going to have to dig deep into his cache of skills, and he’s going to have to be as steadfastly brutal as he’s ever been on film before…because he’s got a whole lot of people to kill.

read more...

Over Under - Large

Ever since names like Spielberg and Lucas brought us the first summer blockbusters back in the 70s, film fans have slowly morphed into film fanatics. And perhaps the pinnacle of this phenomenon is the cult of personality that has developed around Christopher Nolan since he gave us his wildly successful interpretation of the Batman universe, The Dark Knight. Whether it was because of Heath Ledger’s electric performance as the Joker, Nolan’s realist approach to the material, or the sheer scope of the action, something about this Batman movie captured the attention and adoration of hordes of fans in a way that no other adaptation of the character’s story has before; and Batman has been one of the most popular fictional characters in our shared culture for at least half a century now. But one thing about The Dark Knight that I don’t hear mentioned all that much anymore is that it wasn’t Nolan’s first go-around with the character. Everything that was paid off in that film was set up, three years earlier, in the director’s first attempt at tackling a superhero story, Batman Begins. Not only was this movie successful enough at the box office to spawn a very well funded sequel, but it’s the film that’s actually responsible for bringing us Nolan’s grounded and relatable vision of the character. This was the film that revitalized a property whose big screen potential had been tarnished, and it gets treated like it doesn’t even exist when fans gush over their love […]

read more...

Boiling Point

They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, though I’ve never been one to ascribe to that notion. In Hollywood, virtually everything is, at some level, derivative. Hell, not just Hollywood. Virtually every story has been told before, whether it’s comparing the Bible to ancient Egyptian beliefs or Star Wars to The Hidden Fortress. Telling a similar story is okay, hey, there’s only so many ways the good guy can beat the bad guy, right? The details are where the magic happens, and the devil lives. Samurai swords? No. Lightsabers. Transformers are the good guys? How about Transmorphers are the bad guys! However, these are all broad strokes. If we travel further into the script, past plot, past character, past props, we have dialog. Dialog is where the real difference can be made – this is where the magic lives. It’s how a movie like Clerks or My Dinner with Andre or a show like Mad Men can keep you riveted without much going on other than characters talking. But what happens when characters start using the same phrases?

read more...

Taken 2

Why would this family go on vacation to Eastern Europe? Why? Why do it? After your daughter was kidnapped, forced to wear a glittery bikini and stood minutes away from being sold into a harem, why would you not bed down in the exact center of the United States (Lebanon, Kansas by the way) and resume life as quietly as possible? The new trailer for Taken 2 raises this important question, but it also continues to prove that Liam Neeson is a badass not to be trifled with. The opening sequence is perfect, taking on the perspective of the sex trade mafia as Bryan Mills has become somewhat of a legend that needs to be taken out. And take him out, they shall. Or at least they’ll try. Check out the trailer for yourself as you ponder why Maggie Grace is pretending to be 14 years old when her character is at least 20.

read more...

Darren Aronofsky‘s Biblical epic Noah has been through enough chatter over the years to sink even the heartiest of souls, so it’s high time the filmmaker buckled down and began casting the rest of the film’s roles beyond just Russell Crowe as Noah. Just in the interest of getting this ship on the water and all. Deadline Las Vegas reports that Logan Lerman and Douglas Booth are now on board to play Noah’s sons. Lerman will be the oldest, Ham, with Booth taking on the younger role of Shem. This means we’re still in need of some feminine wiles – the boys need a mom and Noah needs a wife (Jennifer Connelly continues to be the name that comes up most often when it comes to this particular role), and Ham apparently gets a love interest (supposedly a “great role” for an up-and-coming young actress). The outlet also reports that, despite earlier chatter, Liam Neeson will not be playing Noah’s “nemesis” in the film. I never really pictured him as raging floodwaters either. That role is also still up for grabs.

read more...

When a “loose” adaptation of Hasbro’s iconic board game Battleship was announced, it didn’t take a genius to figure out what type of film was in the making: big, loud, manic summer fun. The man to deliver on that promise was none other than Peter Berg, a director whose filmography ranges from Friday Night Lights to Hancock. After over three years of working on the film, Berg didn’t make a film that passes itself off as anything it’s not; he’s made Battleship. Battleship features the expected markings of all commercial tentpole films, something Berg did not want to shy away from. As the anti-film school director put it, he wanted to make a global event film, one that doesn’t take itself too seriously. When your film’s based on a popular board game, how could you? Berg, along with his potential blockbuster, could not be more self-aware. Here is what Battleship director Peter Berg had to say about letting life inform storytelling, his organic and actor-friendly approach to filmmaking, and how to keep your sanity while crafting a $200m event film:

read more...

On December 7, 1941, the naval base at Pearl Harbor was attacked by 353 Japanese planes. It was a day that lives in infamy, but now director Peter Berg has reconciled the Americans and Japanese (finally!) in the dumbest, broadest, most pointlessly explosive way possible with Battleship. This obnoxious chore of a movie suffers from two cardinal sins. One, it’s probably the smallest-feeling big movie of the past three decades. Two, it steals so much from other, better movies that there’s no doubt Universal‘s legal team spent time considering possible action. Everything from the script to the CGI are low quality, making this $200m tentpole feel like it was made for fifteen bucks and a pack of gum.

read more...

These days we kind of take it for granted that Liam Neeson is the biggest badass on the planet. But, once upon a time, he was just a budding action star, an actor making a transition from the dramatic roles of his youth to the more throat-punching direction his career has taken recently. Then Taken happened, and suddenly he became the biggest action star on the planet. That modestly budgeted actioner took in $226m worldwide, becoming such a surprise hit that we now find ourselves in the position of eagerly awaiting the sequel. This week, “Entertainment Weekly” is taking advantage of the anticipation by debuting a few stills from the movie, as well as having a little chat with Neeson about what danger his character is going to face this time around. When asked about how Taken 2 ties in to the end of the first film, Neeson explained, “The action is supposed to take place about a year or a year and a half after the first story. It’s a very clever sequel with the usual thrills and spills, but the ante is upped quite a bit in this one.”

read more...

There is absolutely no place for kidnappers in the world as long as Liam Neeson is still around. After jump-starting his new career as movie badass for hire with Taken (soon to be followed by Taken 2: More Takener), Neeson has a found a nice little niche for his work when he’s not busy being nominated for Oscars and stuff. That niche? Ass-kicking bad dudes (and, on occasion, bad wolves). And, in Neeson’s cinematic world, there is no one as bad as kidnappers. Coming out of Cannes is the news that will star in A Walk Among the Tombstones, a film about a guy who (guess what!) goes after some nasty kidnappers. Seriously, kidnappers, put away your duct tape and tiny little magazine letters, it’s over for you. Scott Frank (who wrote Out of Sight, Get Shorty, and Minority Report, and made his directing debut with The Lookout) will write and direct the film, which is based on Lawrence Block‘s “Matt Scudder” book series. There are currently seventeen Scudder books, so if the film is a success, it could swiftly turn into a new franchise. The film is described as such: “Formerly a cop with the NYPD, now an unlicensed private eye and a recovering alcoholic haunted by past mistakes, Matt Scudder is hired to find the kidnapped wife of a drug dealer.  He operates just outside the law where the police don’t go to track down the kidnappers, who he discovers have been involved in multiple kidnappings and brutal […]

read more...

Take a deep breath and prepare to learn everything you need to know about Comic-Con Episode IV: A Fan’s Hope straight director Morgan Spurlock‘s fast-talking mouth. Will it change the world? Probably. Plus, Junkfood Cinema enthusiast Brian Salisbury accepts the dangerous mission to play Movie News Roulette. Download Episode #128

read more...

After fighting kidnapping pimps involved in the sex trade, after fighting wolves, after fighting Nazis in black and white, Liam Neeson is in talks to fight terrorists on a plane. According to Variety, Warners wants him for Non-Stop, and it’s easy to see why. The story is focused on an Air Marshall (who Neeson would play) that gets hip to a terrorism plot on an international flight (one that apparently doesn’t have any transfers or scheduled refueling sessions). He then, most likely, kicks a bunch of ass and tells people to get off his plane. The script was written by John Richardson and Chris Roach – both of whom are newcomers to the writing game – and will be directed by Jeff Wadlow (Cry_Wolf). The poster is going to be great. Neeson looking stony with a cut or two on his face, a plane looming in the background, the tag “The Flight is Non-Stop. So Is He.” Goosebumps.

read more...
  PREVIOUS PAGE
NEXT PAGE  
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Comic-Con 2014
Summer Box Office Prediction Challenge
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3