Lea Michele

Dorothy of Oz

The voice cast for Dorothy of Oz is a blend of rising stars and veterans, especially from TV screens. Lea Michele from Glee plays Dorothy, Kelsey Grammer plays the Tin Man and Patrick Stewart plays a talking boat that keeps tugging his uniform down. The notable names go on, but what’s more notable is how empty the animation feels in this trailer (via ScreenRant). Granted, it’s from the independent Summertime Entertainment, but the quality is years behind the major players, and the sad result is that it looks pretty lame. That money/technology gap is one thing, but the character design (which should be free) looks bland in general and a lot of times the focus of a shot seems incredibly far away. Whoever believes that cinematographers shouldn’t win awards for CGI animation work should absolutely take a look at this. Check it out for yourself:

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Here’s something sort of bizarre – director Garry Marshall and writer Katherine Fugate‘s latest star-crammed desecration of random, non-religious holidays is not monumentally or irremediably terrible. It is also not good, but it’s certainly better than its predecessor, the rancid Valentine’s Day (though that’s not saying much). New Year’s Eve is not so much a film as a gimmick – tons of stars! lots of plots! all kind of connected! just one day! – and such a gimmick can yield some unexpectedly positive results just as often as it can ending up being simply terrible entertainment not worthy of being called cinema. New Year’s Eve is not so much a film as a two-hour piece of wish fulfillment for the sort of people who read US Weekly on, well, a weekly basis. Unlike Valentine’s Day, its very existence is not offensive, but it’s bloated and kind of boring and really, just really, tremendously unnecessary.

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The horror…the horror… The best part about this poster for New Year’s Eve is either that it features all of the names and pictures of the actors, but not in the same order, or that the catchphrase “Let The Countdown Begin” lets us know that it’s a Doomsday Movie. Garry Marshall, who should be ashamed of himself for directing Valentine’s Day, proves once and for all that he owes some serious men down at the race track by stepping up to direct this sequel which seeks to squeeze even less screen time out for even more famous faces. Also, Homeless Hector Elizondo is kind of cruel considering they made everyone else look halfway decent (except for Ashton Kutcher who clearly didn’t show up for a photo shoot and forced the marketing department to find a paparazzi shot of him smiling). Enough with the words! Check it out for yourself, and feel free to largify it by clicking (if you dare):

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If the multiple storylines, loose connections, and a total lack of chemistry of Valentine’s Day was simply not enough for you, director Garry Marshall has yet another holiday-themed film for the masses – twice the storylines! twice the loose connections! twice the total lack of chemistry! Wait, that math isn’t right. Even less chemistry! Everyone, meet New Year’s Eve. Like last year’s chillingly empty Valentine’s Day, Marshall’s latest film tracks a group of romantically challenged love losers across the course of one holiday. Will they find love? Will I hiss in the theater again? When is he making Flag Day? New Year’s Eve moves the action to New York City, though it inexplicably features two stars of VD (Ashton Kutcher and Jessica Biel) who appear to be playing totally different roles than in the previous film. If that hints at some sort of alternate universe, well, that’s still not very interesting to me. The really strange part about this trailer is the sense it gives off that all of its many stars were thrown into a blender, set to “frappe,” and poured out onto the pages of the script. How else can we possibly account for a film that pairs up Katherine Heigl with Jon Bon Jovi, Michelle Pfeiffer with Zac Efron, Lea Michele with Ashton Kutcher, or Jessica Biel with Seth Meyers? And that’s only about a quarter of the cast, everyone else flew by so quickly that my own mother could be in this film, and I wouldn’t […]

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This should have been the episode where Glee jumped the shark, at least commercially. Of course, in true form, Ryan Murphy and team take something obviously dangerous and turn it into something creative, inventive and fun.

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Glee

Where do you go when everything works out? What happens to the hero and his damsel after that glorious last kiss? These are the questions that Executive Producer Ryan Murphy and the creative team behind Glee were faced with when their first season went to break after New Directions won sectionals and coach Will Schuester (Matthew Morrison) finally got the girl. It is a task that they’ve hit head-on in the energetic and blissfully self-aware opening episode to the second half of their first season.

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Sometimes, there is work to be done. And sometimes, the world needs a hero. That work is science, and I am the world’s hero. This week I watch the first season of Glee in one sitting, and live to tell the tale.

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