Keifer Sutherland

After the crucible of Antichrist, Melancholia is the closest thing to a palette cleanser that Lars von Trier is capable of producing. The problem is that a palette cleanser is not what anyone should want from the director who normally pushes the envelope to the point where it can’t even be called an envelope anymore. This is von Trier at his least challenging. The film consists of two halves that almost make a whole. They both focus on a pair of sisters — the first giving more attention to depressive Justine (Kirsten Dunst) on her wedding night, the second to the troubled mother and wife Claire (Charlotte Gainsbourg) on the eve of the earth coming into contact with another planet. However, more than just characters, the pair act more as a platform for delivering archetypes, ideas and more than a bit of visual poetics.

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Despite assertions that I would never consciously put myself through the draining experience of watching one of his films again, this morning saw the first screening of Lars Von Trier’s Melancholia, a film about the end of the world, as well as one that presents the triumph of melancholia, or the feeling that everything we know is hollow. So, now the credits have rolled, the world has ended and again, I find myself challenged by the dichotomy of a film that consciously aims to jar and jolt, rather than be pleasurable (is there any other way for this director though?). Like Malick’s The Tree of Life, Melancholia is experiential cinema, a film that has limited commercial appeal aside from the names attached to it, that is as much a manifestation of Von Trier as an artist as it is a film in its own right, and long after this film festival is done, it will be those two films that will command the most debate, side-by-side. Both are endurance tests, but Melancholia is something entirely different to that other film, even though both will no doubt split the festival. Is it successful? Incredibly so. Though it’s certainly not an enjoyable experience. But at the end of the day, that’s exactly what the infamous director set out to achieve.

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What is Movie News After Dark? This is a question that I am almost never asked, but I will answer it for you anyway. Movie News After Dark is FSR’s newest late-night secretion, a column dedicated to all of the news stories that slip past our daytime editorial staff and make it into my curiously chubby RSS ‘flagged’ box. It will (but is not guaranteed to) include relevant movie news, links to insightful commentary and other film-related shenanigans. I may also throw in a link to something TV-related here or there. It will also serve as my place of record for being both charming and sharp-witted, but most likely I will be neither of the two. I write this stuff late at night, what do you expect?

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Movies We Love

“Isn’t it funny? You hear a phone ring and it could be anybody. But ringing phone has to be answered, doesn’t it?” I don’t think there is anyone out there who doesn’t agree at this point that Joel Schumacher has lost his edge. But before falling of the face of the earth with films like The Phantom of the Opera and The Number 23, he delivered what would be his last great film: The 2003 morality thriller Phone Booth. Stu Shepard is a publicist working in New York City, and he’s everything except a decent human being. From his wife, to his “girlfriend” and his personal assistant, Stu takes advantage of everyone and everything at his disposal. Little did he know how everything was going to change once he picked up the phone today.

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Movies We Love: Stand By Me

There was a time when Rob Reiner’s name being mentioned meant that there was a project we should watch out for; in a good way. Stand By Me is one of the big reasons that was so and is one of the best films of its kind, no matter what kind of film you categorize it as.

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24-71

With the day winding down, Tony finds away to re-constitute the virus using the toxins in Jack’s blood; Olivia Taylor has to fess up to what she’s done; Kim Bauer is still being held captive at the airport.

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24-71

Tony puts Jibraan on a train with the canister set to blow up; Olivia has to deal with the repercussions of Hodges’ death while Aaron Pierce gets suspicious.

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24-71

Jack has to tell Chloe about his infection; Tony stages a bin Laden-esque message for his captive Muslim; Olivia Taylor gets involved with a shady man, asking him to do an equally shady thing; Henry Taylor gets transferred from the hospital to the White House.

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24-71

Tony contacts “The Group,” a collection of people who have to decide what to do with the final gas canister; Jack gets the FBI to reinstate the CTU server and needs Chloe to run it; Hodges having survived the suicide attempt may actually play into President Taylor’s favor.

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24-71

Hearing about Agent Moss, Walker and Jack head up a unit to try and contain the man that stole the gas canister. Tony, still undiscovered as the villain, is helping the man get through the FBI blockade.

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24-71

Jack and Renee get the go-ahead from President Taylor to run a covert operation utilizing Tony on Starkwood’s headquarters, while Jonas Hodges meets with the President to discuss his requests.

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24-71

Agent Moss calls down a stand-off with Hodges’ troops, but creates a diversion so Tony can get inside the compound to find WMDs. Jack is struggling with his infection. Olivia Taylor meets with a newsmaker to get a story covered up.

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24-71

Jack is trying to clear his name after being set up for Ryan Burnett’s death with the assistance from Renee, who leads him to Senator Mayer’s estate.

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24-71

The hostage situation in the White House leads to a daring sacrifice, the dude from Empire Records turns up as Jon Voight’s right-hand man.

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24-71

General Juma takes center stage now that Dubaku is out of the way; Ryan Burnett, one of the masterminds behind the day’s events and Senator Mayer’s (Kurtwood Smith) Chief of Staff, plan to go to the White House; Jack has to ask Chloe to do something questionable (shocking); Walker makes a ballsy decision when seeing that an attack is imminent.

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24-71

Once Matobo arrives at the White House, Jack, Bill, and Walker meet with President Taylor, outlining why they had to deceive her and others in order to regain the CIP device. While there, Taylor receives a phone call from Dubaku saying that they’ve taken her husband Henry captive.

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24-71

The new makeshift CTU team (Jack, Tony, Bill, Renee, and Chloe) follow Matobo to the location Dubaku has set up his base of operations. Dubaku, meanwhile, has chosen a plant in Ohio to inflict damage on 30,000 people using the CIP device which disrupts safeguard firewalls.

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Jack Bauer

The attorney general’s office spares no time coming after Agent Walker’s torture method. Moss has to deal with that at FBI headquarters, along with the fact that Jack and Tony (still presumed to be terrorists) and Emerson have taken Walker captive.

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24-71

The second of a two-night premiere for the Fox hit 24 aired last night, completing the first two episode’s of the Emmy-winning drama’s seventh season.

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24-71

The first of a two-night premiere for the Fox hit 24 aired last night, showing the first two episode’s of the Emmy-winning drama’s seventh season.

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