Kate Bosworth

John Travolta in Killing Season

There are plenty of films about a variety of dangerous career paths. Firefighters, police officers, paramedics, that one where Ashton Kutcher is a Coast Guard, all branches of the military, construction crews, vigilante superheroes, lifeguards, pilots and conductors, detectives and inspectors, astronauts — they’ve all had their due. But one sector of selfless, high-impact human service has largely been ignored by the film industry: linemen. It doesn’t matter what kind, be it those who lay railroad tracks or those who install and repair electrical, telephone or telegraph wires. They’ve gotten the short end of the stick. With the last film to commemorate their work premiering in 1937 (Slim the Lineman, which starred Henry Fonda), it’s now up to John Travolta and a merry band of brethren that includes Kate Bosworth and Devon Sawa to right this wrongs with Life On The Line. The indie drama, directed by David Hackl (Grizzly) and written by the team of Peter Horton, Primo Brown and Dylan Scott, will follow a crew of “eccentric” electric linemen as they fight the elements and presumably each other.

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Sundance: Big Sur

Hot on the heels of the trailer for Kill Your Darlings comes another film about the beat generation – but it’s no tale of fresh faces in a new movement, nor does it take place anywhere near ivy-covered halls. Michael Polish‘s Big Sur is the adaptation of the Jack Kerouac novel that chronicles his life long after the young and wreckless On the Road days have settled in the past. But that doesn’t mean that Kerouac (Jean-Marc Barr) has any less of an interesting life now that he’s older, wiser, more accomplished – he’s just restless  and looking for escape. So he heads out to Big Sur in search of both peace and company, and certainly finds it in friend Neal Cassady’s (Josh Lucas) mistress (Kate Bosworth). With a location like Big Sur, it’s hard for your trailer not to be a stunner. However, our own Allison Loring felt that the prettiness wasn’t enough to save it when she reviewed the film for Sundance earlier this year. Still, holding judgement based on the trailer alone, the film looks intriguing based on the premise that it’s based on a novel from the later part of the beat movement — meaning it’s not going to be as carefree or lively as something written in his younger years. We’re now observing a beatnik with responsibilities, is what I’m saying. Also, I’m just a sucker for when dialogue is written in the same fashion as an author’s writing style. Take a look at the […]

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homefront

History has proven that the only things one needs to make an entertaining movie are Jason Statham, a reason for Jason Statham to fight a bunch of goons, and a bunch of goons for Jason Statham to fight. So seeing as Homefront has even more good stuff going on in it than that, chances are it’s going to be the best thing action movie fans have seen in a while. I mean, its bad guy is James Franco playing a loud-mouthed, small town meth cooker named Gator, and it’s coming to us from the director of Things to Do in Denver When You’re Dead (Gary Fleder). What more could you ask for? The basic story here is that Jason Statham is playing Jason Statham, but this time around he has a young daughter who he’s moved out to the country. Once said daughter has a playground scuffle with the local mouth-breathing fat kid, and said fat kid’s mother turns out to be a crazy trashball (Kate Bosworth) with ties to the would-be local drug kingpin (Franco), conflict escalates to confrontation, and then confrontation escalates to Statham putting a bunch of people’s heads through plate glass windows. Click through to watch it all go down for yourself.

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and while 2

Sometimes, even when you’re living out your life on a breathtakingly picturesque Italian island and look like Kate Bosworth, life can be hard. You can have a mean composer husband who doesn’t want to spend time with you, a sense of misdirection in a foreign country and another man, sweet as he may be, trying to win your affections and sway you from your crummy marriage. As Jane (Bosworth) finds out in Kat Coiro’s And While We Were Here, vacation time off the Italian coast might be the best time to let go of inhibitions and give in to making out with a cute dude. An homage to the many great romantic Italian films (I spy at least one dreamy Vespa ride), the film explores what happens when a person you meet on the street (Jamie Blackley) could turn out to be the love of your life. Though the trailer doesn’t give us too much in terms of plot besides the assertion that the characters will “laugh. cry. love. live,” that actually seems like all we need to know. It’s Italy; they’re in love.

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image001

Smack in the middle of a fizzy-skewing resume that includes titles like L!fe Happens and A Case of You, writer and director Kat Coiro‘s And While We Were Here has long occupied a space of drama and romance that doesn’t seem to come with the kind of belly laughs the filmmaker’s other fare spawns. Based on a set of audio tapes that Coiro made in conversation with her own grandmother, the film follows American writer Jane (Kate Bosworth) as she embarks on what should be a dreamy trip to Italy with her husband (Iddo Goldberg), one that soon becomes mired in her own attempts to adapt tapes of her grandmother’s WWII-set life story for a memoir. Oh, and then there’s that affair with a younger man (Jamie Blackley). It sounds like one heck of a trip, and the film’s newest poster, exclusively debuting here, conveys the wistfulness and dreaminess of a journey worth taking. And While We Were Here will hit VOD on August 13th and theaters on September 13th.

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review black rock

Here’s the thing. If your movie is going to feature two attractive women, completely nude, my first reaction shouldn’t be to laugh. And my second reaction most definitely shouldn’t be to hope they get dressed as soon as possible. But I’m getting ahead of myself. Black Rock is a new thriller with a fairly unusual pedigree. Katie Aselton (The League) stars and directs from a script by her traditionally light-hearted husband, Mark Duplass, and the resulting film is an occasionally successful hybrid of character piece and generic slasher. It essentially drops well-written characters into a highly traditional genre scenario, and while the combination has its benefits it also allows for more than a few issues.

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Sundance: Big Sur

Jack Kerouac is best known for his novel “On The Road,” which helped inspire the Beat generation and brought the author fast fame, but his next novel, “Big Sur,” told the story of how success only made Kerouac feel more lost and trapped. Director Michael Polish attempts to bring the novel to life with Big Sur as we watch Kerouac (Jean-Marc Barr) travel to the beautiful area to secretly stay in his friend Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s (Anthony Edwards) cabin and try and find some peace.

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Black Rock Trailer

As if relations between the sexes weren’t strained enough already, along comes Black Rock, a new thriller from writer Mark Duplass (from everything) and director Katie Aselton (The Freebie) that looks like it’s going to fan the flames further, ensuring that we get at least another year of clueless nincompoops publicly declaring their unsettling opinions about rape. The basic story follows three ladies (Aselton, Lake Bell, and Kate Bosworth) who trek out to an isolated island where they used to have camping trips when they were young; you know, to rekindle lost youth or something. When they’re out there though, the island proves to not be as isolated as they thought. They happen upon a group of three very male hunters (Will Bouvier, Jay Paulson, and Anslem Richardson), one of the ladies gets a little frisky with a bearded gentleman around the campfire, and then he gets way handsy and his buddies suddenly turn super-psychotic. While it doesn’t seem like this story ever reaches Straw Dogs or I Spit on Your Grave levels of grossness, things then degenerate into a battle of survival between the sexes that seems to have more than a little bit of that revenge movie/backwoods horror vibe crossed with a smidge of the Surviving the Game/Hunger Games man-being-hunted trope.

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Multi-hyphenate Katie Aselton returns to Sundance with her second film, a much different outing than her gorgeous and melancholy 2010 entry, The Freebie. This time around, Aselton has ceded writing duties to her husband, Mark Duplass, and the pair have made what will likely be referred to as “Deliverance for girls” for many years to come. But Black Rock is a twisty little horror outing that perhaps shares more with The Freebie than might be obvious from first blush. Both films hinge on interpersonal relationships, the confusion of behavioral signals and perceptions, and mistakes that have far-reaching consequences. Yet, Black Rock is most certainly a thriller and a genre picture, and its wooded island setting, thumping soundtrack (with remarkably sage picks from The Kills), and grim plotline only serve to show how well Aselton can cross genres with style.

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Writer-director Rod Lurie was in a bit of a lose-lose situation when it came to dealing with the hardcore Straw Dogs fans. Like all remakes, if Lurie deviated too much, many critics would ask, “Why call it Straw Dogs?” If the Nothing But the Truth director stayed too faithful, then he’d get ripped on for making a carbon copy. There’s a tough middle ground between those two sides, and Lurie made enough changes to try to find it. For one thing, unlike Sam Peckinpah, Rod Lurie doesn’t hate women. All jokes aside, the original film earned controversy, partly because Peckinpah’s depiction of his female lead was deemed misogynistic. That’s not much of a surprise — Peckinpah treated that character with such disgust, as he treated all the main characters in that film with disgust. His film was about David (played in this version by James Marsden) finding his inner animal, while Lurie opted for David finding his inner man. Here’s what Rod Lurie had to say about the commercial potential of a Straw Dogs remake, the fine line between David being manly and narcissistic, and Peckinpah’s depiction of Amy versus his own: Note: this interview contains spoilers.

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This week, Fat Guy Kevin Carr feels the weight of the fall movie season. It’s September, and while the kids are heading back to school, he’s playing hooky with Sarah Jessica Parker chick flicks and yet another not-quite-70s-video-nasty remake. Kevin is consoled by the release of Drive, however, because Albert Brooks as a crime boss makes him chuckle. And his love for 3D and Disney meet head-on in a collision of awesomeness.

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“EVERYONE HAS A BREAKING POINT,” Yeesh. There’s a good poster in here, but that unneeded and silly tagline doesn’t help matters much. But, really, how many taglines are genuinely good nowadays? Pretty much none. Screen Gems has just putout this lesser homage (via director Rod Lurie’s twitter feed) to the original 1971 Straw Dogs poster; something that’ll anger fans, but will probably work for the average filmgoers who have no idea what a Peckinpah is.

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This Straw Dogs trailer ain’t too pretty, but neither is the audience it was cut for. Screen Gems made this for all the youngin’s going to see Priest (*shudders*) this weekend, and it plays well for that demographic. The audience I was with didn’t look to be the types that are Peckinpah fans, a.k.a. the young and texting generation. To fans of the original and Peckinpah, yes, this is not a good trailer. But for those completely unfamiliar with the original, it works. It is completely by-the-numbers, but why wouldn’t Screen Gems cut a trailer to showcase the main showdown at the end? The trailer does reveal a whole lot, except for the “big” scene, which is surprising. Rod Lurie is a solid writer/director, so I have faith that he’s made something far less generic than this first glimpse implies. Also, to those complaining about the idea of having James Marsden playing a wimpy and passive man, that’s ridiculous. Far more masculine men or equals to Marsden have played those characteristics greatly, even Stallone, someone that doesn’t exactly have a wide “range,” did it well in Cop Land. Marsden has got the chops to pull it off. Check it out for yourself:

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So, in case you didn’t know, Len Wiseman is directing a remake of Total Recall for Sony Pictures. I know what you’re thinking, “Total Recall was a perfect film, how could they possibly remake it and not make something disappointing and stupid, especially in this age of homogenized action movies?” Well shut up you, we will have none of that negativity here in this casting rumors article. Even though Arnold Schwarzenegger is once again free to start acting, this update has Colin Farrell signed on to step into the Hauser/Quaid dynamic. So what we need is a couple of chicks for him to knock boots with. If you recall, the Paul Verhoeven classic had four big female roles. The first is the undercover secret agent playing Quaid’s doting wife. The second is his spicy space mistress Melina, who he hooks up with as part of a rebel uprising on Mars. The third is the hooker with three boobs. And the fourth is the midget hooker who blows a bunch of guys away with a machine gun. We have yet to get any word on the casting of the second two roles, but Deadline Thal has dug up some info on the process behind filling the first two.

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Yes, that one shot does make The Warrior’s Way look like a remake of The Birds featuring ninjas, and the rest of it looks like an effects-driven martial arts movie. Sometimes that can be a bad thing, but it honestly feels like the natural evolution from the Wire Fu movies of the past, and here it looks like everything is carefully done. Plus, it’s cowboys vs ninjas. How can that go wrong? Cross your fingers for decent-looking CGI blood (or no blood at all). The film stars Geoffrey Rush, Kate Bosworth, Korean star Dong-gun Jang, and Danny Huston. What do you think?

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The actors have signed up for the drama featuring young teen girls who run away to Los Angeles to do bad stuff with skaters.

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Ten Skinny-Ass Ladies Who Used to Be Hot

Too many actresses are believing the line that you can’t be too thin. Please, ladies, eat a sandwich or something at the craft services cart. Here are a special shout-out to ten skinny-ass celebs that used to really turn heads.

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21 Movie Review

21 galvanizes you from frame one and never lets go. It’s the most entertaining movie about Sin City in recent memory; right up there with Ocean’s Thirteen.

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21

While the actual concept and events in the film are real, they have been so gussied up with glitz and flash that we lose the essence of the drama. It tries to be as slick and as cool as an MTV music video, but it completely busts. [Grade: C]

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Anyone who has ever been to Vegas knows that you get free drinks at the blackjack tables. And while this will cloud your mind and hinder you in counting cards, free drinks would be great in a movie like 21.

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published: 12.22.2014
C-
published: 12.19.2014
A-
published: 12.18.2014
C-


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