Joshua Caldwell

Layover Movie

The prevailing optimism tells us that whenever the Hollywood studio system is underserving an audience or an entire genre, indie filmmakers will appear like the cavalry to fill the gaps. If that’s true (and it probably is), it’s fitting that Joshua Caldwell‘s Layover was released the same week Warner Bros. announced its next thousand years of DC superhero movies. It’s an antidote to spandex, a movie that won’t set the world on fire that comes at a time when we should be questioning the virtue of movies that set the world on fire. What it is, is a beautifully mature work from a promising young director that calmly and confidently explores themes like the inevitability of life’s pattern and the unnecessary transformative effect of random experiences. It also does all this while being far less pretentious than that sentence is. Simone (Nathalie Fay) lands in Los Angeles after flying from Paris, on her way to Indonesia to see a boyfriend who she’s convinced will be proposing at the baggage carousel. Her connecting flight is delayed, the airline posts her up in a hotel for the evening, and her night blossoms when she meets up with her old friend, Juliette (Bella Dayne). They head out into the wilderness of the city, and Simone crosses tire treads with a mysterious motorcyclist (Karl E. Landler).

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Layover Movie

Let’s say you desperately want to make a feature film, but you don’t have any money to do it. Can you scrape together a few thousand? Good, because writer/director Joshua Caldwell and producer Travis Oberlander join us this week to explain how they made Layover for only $6,000. Beyond making a movie for a few months’ rent, Geoff and I will answer your screenwriting questions and continue our star-spangled conversation from last week by exploring the concepts of Freedom and Revolution as they apply (for better and worse) to filmmaking. You should follow Caldwell (@joshua_caldwell), Travis Oberlander (@tobewan), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis. Please review us on iTunes Download Episode #66 Directly Or subscribe Through iTunes

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Dig Short Film

Why Watch? There are few things as irritating as a group of college student characters sitting around a table waxing philosophical about things they learned 15 minutes ago. It’s so grating that it would make a great writing challenge for just about any screenwriter, but writer/director Joshua Caldwell and writer Travis Oberlander have already taken up the cause to make the cliche engaging and meaningful. In Dig, said stereotype is huddled around a restaurant table wearing the usual trappings of faux-intelligence while discussing ethics and Nietzsche and buzz words, but one of them is wrestling with something real. He’s a Holocaust survivor, and two decades after fleeing from Europe, he finds one of the Nazis responsible for his loved ones’ deaths. Now he has a beating heart blindfolded in his backseat instead of books and theories. They drive to the middle of nowhere, and one tells the other to start digging six feet down. The camera work is all strong — featuring tight close-ups early on, then letting the scenery of the desert fill in the silence between the two men. It’s also edited cleanly, technically proficient all the way around, but it’s the writing and interaction between the two enemies (the Nazi being played by Breaking Bad‘s bell-dinging Mark Margolis) that really sells an impossible tension between revenge and satisfaction. What will it cost? Around 24 minutes. Skip Work. Watch More Short Films.

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published: 12.23.2014
B+
published: 12.22.2014
C-
published: 12.19.2014
A-


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