Josh Lucas

Sundance: Big Sur

Hot on the heels of the trailer for Kill Your Darlings comes another film about the beat generation – but it’s no tale of fresh faces in a new movement, nor does it take place anywhere near ivy-covered halls. Michael Polish‘s Big Sur is the adaptation of the Jack Kerouac novel that chronicles his life long after the young and wreckless On the Road days have settled in the past. But that doesn’t mean that Kerouac (Jean-Marc Barr) has any less of an interesting life now that he’s older, wiser, more accomplished – he’s just restless  and looking for escape. So he heads out to Big Sur in search of both peace and company, and certainly finds it in friend Neal Cassady’s (Josh Lucas) mistress (Kate Bosworth). With a location like Big Sur, it’s hard for your trailer not to be a stunner. However, our own Allison Loring felt that the prettiness wasn’t enough to save it when she reviewed the film for Sundance earlier this year. Still, holding judgement based on the trailer alone, the film looks intriguing based on the premise that it’s based on a novel from the later part of the beat movement — meaning it’s not going to be as carefree or lively as something written in his younger years. We’re now observing a beatnik with responsibilities, is what I’m saying. Also, I’m just a sucker for when dialogue is written in the same fashion as an author’s writing style. Take a look at the […]

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Sundance: Big Sur

Jack Kerouac is best known for his novel “On The Road,” which helped inspire the Beat generation and brought the author fast fame, but his next novel, “Big Sur,” told the story of how success only made Kerouac feel more lost and trapped. Director Michael Polish attempts to bring the novel to life with Big Sur as we watch Kerouac (Jean-Marc Barr) travel to the beautiful area to secretly stay in his friend Lawrence Ferlinghetti’s (Anthony Edwards) cabin and try and find some peace.

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Josh Lucas in Red Dog

Actor Josh Lucas has certainly had a diverse career so far, from the quality of movies he makes, to the scope of the films he’s appeared in, to their level of success. It’s quite a leap going from David Gordon Green’s understated Undertow to Rob Cohen’s opus Stealth, and there was a time when it seemed as if we were going to see Lucas appear in plenty of Poseidons and Stealths. Yet, in recently speaking with the actor, it seem that type of “candy” entertainment just doesn’t peak his interest nowadays. When discussing his recent project Red Dog, Lucas sounded more interested in pursuing projects more in line with the feel-good Australian “dog” picture. It’s a movie where all the actors never veer from sentimentality, something that doesn’t bother Lucas, which, as he tells us, usually isn’t a part of his “less is more” approach. Here’s what Josh Lucas had to say about serving a project as a piece, wanting to tell entertaining stories, and wishing for a clearer relationship with how he feels about his films:

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Stolen Movie Nic Cage 2012

A general rule of thumb to follow when dealing with modern Nic Cage movies is that the more ridiculous his hair looks in the trailer, the more awesomely bad the movie is going to end up being. Given that criteria, it doesn’t seem like his latest film, Stolen, is really going to be anything to write home about. Just look at that relatively short, slicked back, graciously-accepting-the-receding-nature-of-the-hairline do that he’s sporting here—it’s almost typical for a man his age. Given the apparent lack of lunacy, is Stolen even going to be worth watching? Maybe. It’s important to keep in mind that this project is re-teaming the actor with his Con Air director, Simon West, and Con-Air is one of the seminal, balls-crazy Nic Cage action films. He plays a character named Cameron Poe in that one, for heaven’s sake. There’s bound to be at least some residual craziness seeping into this one, even if Cage has people hair and is playing a character named Will Montgomery. We do know that there’s at least one scene where Cage awkwardly holds a teddy bear in public. And Josh Lucas does seem to be pretty creepy playing some sort of cab-driving villain who looks like one of the bank robber surfers from Point Break if they got into meth. Plus, making a movie about a kidnapped daughter called Stolen after Liam Neeson had so much success getting his daughter kidnapped in Taken lends the whole thing a B-grade, ripoff charm. It looks like […]

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The aptly titled Hide Away (previously titled A Year In Mooring) is a quiet film that lives up to its name and premiered at the 2011 SXSW Film Festival where I called it a “meditation, intended to be slow and dwell in the melancholy.” Telling the story of an unnamed man (Josh Lucas) who hopes working to rebuild a rundown sailboat will also work to rebuild his own life, the film takes hold of you slowly, almost like grief itself. Plagued by a serious loss and struggling through that frustrating and undefined mourning period, Lucas truly embodies a man who has seemingly lost everything, but is still working to find his way back. I have long championed the talents of Lucas and this exclusive clip features his natural ability to take a simple scene and imbue it with a sense of heart and charm despite the pain his character is clearly carrying on his shoulders. Paired with accomplished actor James Cromwell, featured here as a more weathered mariner, Lucas steps up to the plate and it is their scenes together (and their shared sense of mourning) that were some of my favorites in the film.

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This week, Fat Guy Kevin Carr goes to war. He strips down to his muscular awesomeness and shimmies into a codpiece. After applying a solid gold breastplate, he’s too exhausted to actually go to war, so he heads to the local movie cinema to catch Immortals, wondering if Isabel Lucas has ever eaten a carbohydrate in her life. Then he slips into a housedress and sneaks into an early screening of J. Edgar. After a quick nap, he tries to escape the horror that is Jack and Jill, but alas, that did not happen. You can send him care packages now, courtesy of his local mental institution.

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James Franco has been a busy guy lately, hosting the Oscars and getting involved in just about every high-profile project in development. But did you know that he also does direct-to-DVD psycho-thrillers? I didn’t, either. But apparently he does. In Shadows & Lies, Franco plays William Vincent, a quiet and mysterious criminal. When he falls for a New York gangster’s (Josh Lucas) favorite call girl (Julianne Nicholson), Vincent is forced to flee the city, threatened with death if he should ever return. But after four years in exile, Vincent secretly returns intent on rescuing the woman he loves from her dangerous fate. In this clip, which we are pleased to present exclusively, we see the moment when the quiet criminal, having just stolen a wallet, meets gangster Josh Lucas in a chance encounter. I suspect it won’t be the last time.

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What is Movie News After Dark? This is a question that I am almost never asked, but I will answer it for you anyway. Movie News After Dark is FSR’s newest late-night secretion, a column dedicated to all of the news stories that slip past our daytime editorial staff and make it into my curiously chubby RSS ‘flagged’ box. It will (but is not guaranteed to) include relevant movie news, links to insightful commentary and other film-related shenanigans. I may also throw in a link to something TV-related here or there. It will also serve as my place of record for being both charming and sharp-witted, but most likely I will be neither of the two. I write this shit late at night, what do you expect?

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This week, Fat Guy Kevin Carr horses around this week with the legendary racehorse from the 1970s, hoping he too can go home with Diane Lane. After racing out to see Secretariat, he wonders if Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel would be anything more than a pretty couple. Then he gets down on his knees and prays: “Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray the Lord my soul to keep. If I should die before I wake, I beg you skip My Soul to Take.”.

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It’s difficult to find the words to express in reaction to Get Low, mainly because the film doesn’t say much in and of itself. This is not to say that the film is either terrible or magnificent; when one watches Get Low it’s hard to get the sense that it is good or bad as much as it is simply a non-event.

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Jon Hamm in Stolen

In Stolen tragedies link two fathers, living in the same town some 50 years apart. Each man abandoned his young son for a brief moment, never to see him again. The movie surrounding them is every bit the unpleasant slog one might expect, glum and murkily shot, wallowing in pedantic histrionics and badly lacking the breathing room it desperately needs.

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