Indie Film

Night Moves Movie

Superheroes rule the box office and the Guardians of the Galaxy have brought us the biggest film of the summer (which is about to dethrone Captain America to become the biggest film of the year). But talking about these big-budget behemoths with gigantic box office rewards (unless you’re the latest installment of the Expendables or Sin City brand) means talking about the same thing over and over again – a happy hour of strange creatures, diversified only by a couple comedies. Fortunately there’s a great mix of summer fare that kicked absolute ass on a very modest per-screen basis. One can’t exactly expect that a limited release in select big cities would fare as well if it expanded to thousands of theaters across the nation (averages generally shrink when/if they do), but it’s still great to see the “little guy” head into a release in a handful of theaters and earn a better average than the top summer film (Guardians had $23,118 on 4,080 screens). All of the following movies beat that average (save one that opened on only two screens), and offer everything from period dramas to modern comedy to films that took over a decade to capture. The men in tights, so to speak, may have won the box office, but I’m happy a selection of films like this still exists in this ever-mainstream movie world.

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Tim Burton Batman

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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Don Peyote

As it turns out, it’s completely possible to spend the warmest months without seeing a single superhero or explosion, and on this week’s show, Geoff and I proclaim our excitement for the indie/non-blockbuster pics that might provide greatness this season. We’ll also talk about our all-time favorite screenplays to read. Plus, Paracinema writer Matthew Monagle is our first participant in a segment called You Have a Year and a Half to Make Us Excited About Star Wars: Episode VII. Let’s see if he persuades you. Double plus, we’ll chat with Dan Fogler about 2012 conspiracies and getting beaten up by Anne Hathaway for the trippy Don Peyote. You should follow Matthew (@labsplice), the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis. Please review us on iTunes Download Episode #57 Directly Or subscribe Through iTunes

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Kiefer Sutherland in Pompeii

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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Short Term 12

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

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MoPix CEO Ryan Stoner wants your movie to find an audience. He also wants fans to find new filmmakers. His company is a turnkey digital distribution model that seeks to give up to 100% of profit made through online “ticket” sales back to the production. It’s a bold new business, and he joins us to discuss their goals, what drives them, and his vision for the future. Plus, Cinema Blend Editor-in-Chief and Operation Kino host Katey Rich joins the show to play Good News Bad News with this week’s top stories. Download Episode #144

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The Do-Deca-Pentathalon

The Duplass Brothers got into making movies by making movies. Some called it Mumblecore, but it should really be called The Nike Method. Their latest, The Do-Deca-Pentathalon features two brothers locked in an epic (yet secretive) sporting event that they take exactly as seriously as it needs to be taken. But as Mark and Jay Duplass explain in this interview, no matter the type of movie they make, they’ll always focus on the small moments and emotions that arise from them. One example? Battleship. If given the blockbuster, here’s how the pair would have delivered the littoral explosion-fest

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Video Game High School

The absolute, must-read article of the week is “Disrupted: Indie Filmmakers” from Brian Newman at Sub-Genre . The week isn’t over yet, but the article that shows how popularity on YouTube has sidestepped the traditional indie film festival track will be tough to beat. It may sound a bit counter-intuitive because videos that get millions of views on YouTube are How To Videos and shots of cats wearing monocles and stuff, but there are a handful of popular users that are translating a massive subscriber list (and an even bigger amount of views) into funding through KickStarter (the above image comes from Video Game High School) and IndieGoGo to raise funds for more projects. Meanwhile, filmmakers trying to find funding are still going through festivals like Sundance and, often, falling short. It’s a fascinating theory because it seems plausible. It might not make immediate sense that making mash-ups and quirky spoofs could lead to big screen bliss, but all the elements are there.

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As Todd Solondz explains, Dark Horse is a different kind of take on the Judd Apatow celebration of the Manchild. It’s a bit more aggressive, a lot more realistic, and complex in the way that fans have come to expect from the director of Welcome to the Dollhouse and Palindromes. Set beyond cheerful pop music, the film follows Jordan Gelber, looking a lot like Jeff Garlin, as he attempts to navigate what he views as a cruel, unfair world in the yellow hummer his parents bought for him. He discovers something like love with the depressed Miranda (a differently-named character reprised by Selma Blair from Storytelling), and he struggles (often hilariously) to understand a world shifting around him. Fortunately, Solondz took some time out to discuss his take on later-life childhood, how to respond to fans who laugh at child-rape, and how the indie filmmaking world has changed since the 1990s. Download Episode #135

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From a family legacy to positive portrayals of black youth to showing up at the club with your kids, Mario Van Peebles and his son Mandela cover it all while discussing their forthcoming flick We The Party. To the bass beat of The Rej3ctz and Snoop Dogg, we discuss rising above racism, staying hip, heading out in a hoodie and a whole lot more. Plus, Hollywood.com Movies Editor Matt Patches joins us for Movie News Roulette and weighs in on Bully and Ninja Turtles. Download Episode #127

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On January 11, 1991, the then-head of Disney studios, Jeffrey Katzenberg, circulated an incredibly important memo about the state of the movie industry and the products they were making. It was called, “The World is Changing: Some Thoughts on Our Business,” and it had a simple purpose: to locate the root of a growing problem and to take steps to avoid falling victim to it. Katzenberg began the memo by stating: “As we begin the new year, I strongly believe we are entering a period of great danger and even greater uncertainty. Events are unfolding within and without the movie industry that are extremely threatening to our studio.” As we begin a new year two decades after this memo was written, it’s critical to look back at the points Katzenberg made to see that his period of great danger is now our period of great danger, to note that the same events unfolding within and without the industry still threaten the entire studio system in 2012, and to predict our future based on the past.

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In our first show of the 2012 season, we set off the filmmaking fireworks by finding out why Innkeepers director Ti West doesn’t believe in spooks, and by talking to indie icon Ed Burns about the twitter revolution, his $9,000 budget, and his new must-see movie Newlyweds. Plus, Neil Miller stops by to dangle the hope and potential of 2012’s most anticipated movies over our noses. Will he say the movie you’re thinking of and validate his opinion to you, or will he neglect it, making everything he says in the future suspect? Be prepared to find out a metric ton about movies and their makers, because it’s our third season, and we’re only getting started. Download This Episode

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This week, on a very special episode of Reject Radio, we celebrate the end of an era, talk to a first-time writer/director, discuss the fine art of short film creation with a seasoned hand, and hear from movie icon Wings Hauser. Wings Hauser, people. Max Winkler hit the festivals hard with Ceremony, his coming of age story starring Michael Angarano and Uma Thurman. Now it’s seeing a limited release, and he’s stopped by to discuss the benefits of getting your heart broken and the wrong way to crash a party. We featured the short film The Candy Shop on the site recently, and director Brandon McCormick was nice enough to share his production methods, talk about working with Doug Jones, and tell listeners how they can help fight sex trafficking in their own backyard. As if that weren’t enough, Wings Hauser joins us moments before a special screening of the 80s classic Vice Squad at the Alamo Drafthouse to talk about the confusing, wonderful nature of his latest co-starring role in Rubber and to generally be a badass. Plus, Erik Davis of Movies.com and Eric Snider from Film.com fight to the pain in our Movie News Pop Quiz (and join Scott Weinberg to talk about the end of Cinematical (as we know it) and what happened with HuffPo/Aol). Loosen up your tie and stay a while. Listen Here: Download This Episode

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Every week, Landon Palmer and Cole Abaius log on to their favorite chat client of 1996 as Expressionalism23 and 5DollarMilkshake in order to discuss some topical topic of interest. This week, we avoid paradigm-shifting seriousness in favor of discussing what we love about film festivals. The energy, the electricity, the discovery, all of it comes together to create a communal experience that film demands but rarely sees anymore out of the festival circuit. We both missed SXSW, but that doesn’t mean we’re not there in spirit.

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In a recent, must-read interview, Francis Ford Coppola reveals at least two things that might come as a surprise to fans. The first is that his success with The Godfather actually derailed him from a plan to make intimate, personal stories that he was passionate about. The second is that he believes artists aren’t meant to be wealthy. Coppola points back to the beginnings of art and the benefactor model. He also points to the concept of having another source of income so that filmmaking can remain an arduous hobby and an outlet for taking risks. He’s absolutely, idealistically correct (even if he does question why art has to cost money (which is a little like asking why cameras have to cost money)), and amidst the radical concept that maybe people should be able to view art of all kinds for free, he offers his three rules for filmmaking.

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Every week, Landon Palmer and Cole Abaius log on to their favorite chat client of 1996 as NoWaveSurfer and KeatonRox2738 in order to discuss some topical topic of interest. This week, the purported death of indie films that’s reported upon faithfully every year (at least 4 times a year). In the face of the Independent Film’s best friend festival beginning this weekend, we tackle the real question: Indie films can’t actually be dead, can they?

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With recent events involving fresh piracy lawsuits, and people vehemently defending their right to steal, it’s important to check out what filmmakers think about piracy. In the case of Kiowa Winans and Rhett Reese, it’s not as black and white as you’d think.

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Matthew Vaughn Kick-Ass

With Kick-Ass, Matthew Vaughn wanted to go against the grain and against the studios, and it looks like he may have done just that.

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This week, on a very special episode of Reject Radio, Brian Gibson and I break down what’s hot and what’s sweaty here at South By Southwest.

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This week, on a very special episode of Reject Radio, we avoid getting hit by a volcano. By. That. Much.

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published: 12.23.2014
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published: 12.22.2014
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published: 12.19.2014
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