horror

Not content to deliver the same kind of movie as REC and REC 2, Paco Plaza has crawled way out onto a blood-covered limb to turn the third installment, REC 3: Genesis, into a romantic horror comedy set at a wedding. There are still some jaw-ripping practical effects and zombie scares aplenty, but the tone is purposefully meant to deny audience’s their expectations.The gamble is one that might alienate fans. This week on Reject Radio Horror Chit Chat, we speak with the director about the risk in making something beyond expectations (and how he plans on getting killed quickly when the zombie apocalypse goes down). Plus, we get into a thorough discussion about remakes with our old friend Scott Weinberg. Download Episode #143

read more...

Toad Road - Fantasia

Toad Road is an urban legend; a mythic trail residing in the woods of York, Pennsylvania. It is said to house the seven gates leading to hell, and any unfortunate pedestrian traveling this path at night will travel through each gate individually. Sarah (Sarah Joelle Hildebrand) is fascinated by this myth upon hearing of its existence from her new boyfriend James. Point of fact, Sarah has been experiencing many new things thanks to her new beau; not the least of which being a veritable buffet of hard drugs. She gets it into her head that sucking down a narcotic cocktail and traipsing into these woods after dark will allow her to achieve a higher form of consciousness. Unfortunately, like many ideas one concocts while in an altered state, her plan goes horribly awry. There is a perception in certain circles that films made by those who attend film school are inherently smarter, more artful, and requiring of a more refined palate to appreciate. While there certainly are films that fall under this distinction, the danger of that mentality is that it gives rise to a wave of lackluster fluff masquerading under these intellectual pretenses. Enter Toad Road, which had its world premiere at Fantasia Fest. Toad Road is an empty vessel, a thinly-veiled metaphor explored a hundred times before with nowhere near as much new to bring to the table as it desperately believes it possesses. Oh, really, delving into drug addiction is similar to descending into hell? How novel.

read more...

A Little Bit Zombie

Steve and Tina are about to get married, a prospect that gravely disturbs Steve’s sister who–in addition to being married to Steve’s best friend–thinks Tina is as right for him as an angry hornet’s nest is for a family picnic. Much in that same vein, Steve thinks it wise to take the quartet to the family cabin for the weekend so everyone can learn to play nice. Adding to the incredibly tense proceedings is a mosquito who managed to feed on a walking corpse a few miles over. You see, a pair of expert zombie hunters were just wrapping up the last loose ends of an undead carnival when the pesky insect sneaked a bite and made his way over to the cabin. The mosquito bites Steve several times, and soon he begins showing the classic tell-tale signs of zombism. But can this nice-guy zombie be cured?

read more...

Rites of Spring

In the indie horror flick Rites of Spring, some kidnappers snag a rich kid and then hides out in an abandoned building. Unfortunately for them, it’s the most dangerous spot they could have picked because there’s something monstrous waiting to take its yearly sacrifice. From writer/director Padraig Reynolds, it stars A.J. Bowen, Katherine Randolph, and Anessa Ramsey. Check out the trailer for yourself. It’s a good reminder that stealing children might be a bad idea.

read more...

Russell Crowe

It’s sort of fascinating that a vampire craze born from Twilight has shifted back toward Bram Stoker’s original vision: Tom Cruise and Sony are going vampire hunting with Van Helsing; Neil Marshall is boarding The Voyage of the Demeter; and now Russell Crowe might bring his Oscar statue to the set of Harker to play Dracula for Eli Roth. According to Deadline Romania, Roth is currently in talks to take over the chair for the Warners project where Jaume Collet-Serra used to sit. First of all, the prospect of Crowe taking on a classic character like this is pretty damned exciting. Granted, his Robin Hood was hampered by a lame movie, but Crowe would be walking in Bela Lugosi’s and Gary Oldman’s shoes (just to name a few). Secondly, it’s nice to see such a dusty character have so much life left in him – especially since it seems studios are more interested in a return to form (instead of simply sprinkling more glitter on everything).  

read more...

VHS Horror Movie

The red band trailer for V/H/S – the new horror anthology from a slew of indie writers and directors – was excellent, but there’s something magical about a green band trailer for scary flicks that makes a movie sing. The limitations either mean the trailer will sink miserably or soar to pants-wetting heights. This feature does the latter. From Adam Wingard, Simon Barrett, Radio Silence, Joe Swanberg, Dennis McQuaid, and David Bruckner, the movie wraps five horror tales inside a story about thieves trying to find a mysterious video tape amongst a pile of dangerous found footage. Plus, it might be the first movie to have two forward slashes in its title. Check out the new trailer for yourself:

read more...

The Tall Man - Jessica Biel

Remember that old argument that foreign directors who make the jump to English-language and/or Hollywood studio films, usually make something that’s not so good? Pascal Laugier (Martyrs) might be adding more proof to that theory. The international trailer for The Tall Man (aka The Secret) features Jessica Biel trying to find her son after he’s taken, possibly, by a sort of urban legend who wears a big black cloak and could probably play professional basketball. It’s pretty bland, but it might just be bitterness that this isn’t that Angus Scrimm documentary everybody’s been clamoring for. Check it out for yourself:

read more...

Who doesn’t love watching teenagers fight? These days it’s just nice to see them doing something that gets them outside and moving around – not to mention the wonders it does for team building skills and self esteem issues. Compared to them sitting in a moist den somewhere playing Skyrim and housing six servings of Zesty Salsa Combos, youth violence isn’t the worst fate for our nation’s children. Anyhoo – Here are some of the better films that celebrate the time-honored tradition of kids punching each other to pass the time.

read more...

VHS Horror Movie

Back at Sundance, Magnolia seized the forthcoming horror anthology from Bloody Disgusting which means we’ll all have a (limited) shot at seeing it in Octobers. V/H/S, featuring the talents of Adam Wingard, Simon Barrett, Ti West and Radio Silence just to name a few, has several different scare segments all tied together by the story of thieves breaking into a creepy house to steal a tape and watching a handful to find out which one is the right loot. So, it’s pretty much like every Wednesday around here. The first Red Band trailer showcases some excellent shots meant to draw the pee into an audience’s pants. Ghosts, monsters, blood-splattered everything. Check it out for yourself:

read more...

Tom Holland and Stephen King

It’s been 16 years since Tom Holland‘s last feature film, Thinner, hit screens. It came at the end of a career of writing work like Class of 1984 and Psycho 2 and directing Fight Night and Fatal Beauty. But now, it’s not the end. According to Deadline Castle Rock, Holland is going to make Stephen King‘s “Ten O’Clock People” his next feature film. Beyond this and Thinner, Holland also adapted King’s “The Langoliers” for TV and appears in The Stand. The story for Ten O’Clock People focuses on a man quitting smoking, who discovers that he (and others trying to kick the habit) are able to see hideous monsters who have disguised themselves and made their way to prominent positions in society. Just like we all knew all along. These Batmen pose a great threat, and it will be interesting to see Holland flesh out King’s short story which is, admittedly, a bit thin. Sorry for the pun. However, it seems as though King is having a filmic re-emergence with many different projects in the works (Dark Tower, Carrie and others). A million years ago, we posted a list of Stephen King short stories that would make great movies, and this wasn’t on there because (while this is incredibly interesting) there are a ton of other stories that would be better suited for the big screen. It’s a head-scratcher, but it’s cool to see Holland back in the saddle.

read more...

Drinking Games

More than thirty years ago, Ridley Scott directed the groundbreaking sci-fi/horror film Alien. Now, this summer, he’s prepping the release of the sister film Prometheus. As is the case when any sequel, prequel or remake comes out, fans will want to revisit the original film. Whether you’re planning on watching the entire Alien series (including the odious Alien Resurrection and the batshit crazy Alien vs. Predator: Requiem) or just the first – and possibly best – of the run, here’s where you’ll start. And what better way to enjoy this classic monster movie in space film than with a frosty drink in hand?

read more...

The Coroner

It’s fairly rare that a film can come along and generate a lot of attention just based on the premise. The Human Centipede was one such film. It claimed to be “100% Medically Accurate,” was viewed at Fantastic Fest, and took the world by storm by asking the question “What would it be like to sew a bunch of people ass to mouth?” At the time, I was hard on the claim that the flick was medically accurate, despite writer/director Tom Six‘s insistence. I’ve since changed my mind: sure, it’s entirely possible to sew a bunch of people together like that as long as you expect them to choke on feces and die relatively quickly. There is no shared digestion, but hey, he never said it was 100% a good idea! Unfortunately, that flick wasn’t 100% good. For me, I found it to be 52% good, which, as it turns out, is at least 30% better than the follow-up. Hey hey hey hey, listen to me. Spoilers ahead.

read more...

William Lustig’s original 1980 Maniac was of the highest, grainy midnight movie caliber. Perhaps it’s not sacred ground, but it’s a grisly example of an artifact from when terrifying and exploitative slashers were hacking their way onto big screens. It makes sense that there’s so much speculation surrounding Franck Khalfoun‘s remake starring Elijah Wood as a man with mommy issues trying to make the perfect woman. Now thanks to Cannes, there’s a teaser trailer to inform us all on the style. Is it gritty? Sort of. It’s the kind of gritty that you might take to a gallery opening or to an experimental ballet. Those exist right? It’s a little grit with gloss all over it. It will probably make you take a shower afterward, but the POV shots especially make this look like it came out of an NYU Film School grad’s portfolio. Check it out for yourself:

read more...

“In some cases however, the passage of time is a blessing…Time heals all wounds, makes us forget, or, allows us a chance to reflect. Three years is an abundance of time. A lot can happen in 36 months: wars have been fought and lost, relationships have blossomed and then been destroyed, children have been conceived, born, and taken their first steps. In the case of Mother’s Day, 3 years was the amount of time it took me to become disillusioned with the filmmaking process.” That’s director Darren Bousman revving the horror engine on a nightmare. It doesn’t involve a reverse bear trap or a team sent back for your organs, so it’s probably scarier. It’s the story of how a movie that Bousman made that simultaneously met his creative vision and received high praise from testing audiences went from a huge potential opening to a release last weekend that no one heard about. Bousman goes into deep detail, chronicling the journey of a movie that wrapped in 2009 and didn’t see the light of day until 2012. It’s a must-read piece for how candid Bousman is regarding a hell on the other side of development. Let’s call it Post-Production Hell. His segment on what watching a test audience react to his work is especially enlightening. Ultimately, the train of events looks something like this:

read more...

While both trying to cash in on a persistent craze and attempting to wipe the glitter off (it’s the herpes of the craft world for a reason), The Descent director Neil Marshall is the latest director ready to embark on The Last Voyage of the Demeter. The cruise will feature a vampire and a captive buffet aboard the high seas. According to a lot of nautical puns in The Hollywood Reporter, Millennium Films is taking the long-gestating script from Bragi Schut (Season of the Witch). It was written a decade ago, which means Schut has worked a long time to earn a single writing credit on a mediocre movie, but now his vision of extrapolating a minor plot point in Bram Stoker‘s classic novel will potentially see the light of day. For whatever reason, the project has attracted several directors (Robert Schwentke, Marcus Nispel, David Slade) and even a set of stars (Ben Kingsley, Noomi Rapace) but has never made it past the development stage. Now, it has a fresh start, an intriguing director, and a lot of potential for a trend that might be in its death throes (again) even if it’s going out with a prolific bang.

read more...

As an expert on Asylum movies, the bar isn’t exactly high here, but what’s most striking about the trailer for Jose Prendes‘s The Haunting of Whaley House is that it looks like an actual movie – not a CGI-from-1994 slathered abomination cribbing close to the legal limit of blockbuster theft. Granted, it’s a haunted house film, and it looks like it’s maintained the central tropes, but there’s lighting! And decent camera work! And the lines don’t completely read like they came from a a sophomore in high school with a loose understanding of grammar! Could it be? Could The Asylum have produced a good movie? It’s too soon to tell, but we’ve acquired proof that it’s highly possible:

read more...

How’d you like to be killed by Elijah Wood? You would have never seen it coming. For one, he’s one of the nicer guys on the planet. For two, we already saw how sneaky a murderer he can be in Sin City. He’ll most likely be a bit louder, ripping blood out of its veiny home in Franck Khalfoun‘s Maniac remake, though. Apparently, he’s also going to be slicing open mannequin heads. Just as everyone hoped he would. And co-star Nora Arnezeder will horrifyingly talk on a cell phone! Check out these first images from the production:

read more...

The Coroner

Doghouse, which was called Zombie Harlem in Japan (I can’t tell if that’s better or worse), is a British horror-comedy that’s been resting in my Netflix queue for the better part of two years. One of those films that sounds interesting, but has an air of uncertain quality about it. The official synopsis goes a little something like this: a group of men head to a remote village to help their friend get over a divorce, only to find it overrun with women who hunger for flesh. Sounds titillating right? And by titillating, I mean it should have a lot of boobs in it, right? And carnage? And death? Correct! That’s what it sounds like. But that’s not what it is.

read more...

The level of neon-glowing attention to detail in Panos Cosmatos‘s Beyond the Black Rainbow is intense. The first-time director has taken the images of forbidden horror VHS tapes on rental store shelves and transformed his imagined movies into something very real, and very frightening. It’s a trip into a lonely cult that mixes religion, science and pills. We’ll talk with the writer/director about his psychedelic terror-scape. Plus, Battleship Pretension hosts David Bax and Tyler Smith battle in our Movie News Pop Quiz, and the discussion turns to the nature of superhero movies. Are they an action subgenre? Can there be a superhero movie without any action? Is The Avengers the zenith? Reject Radio starts now. As soon as you click that. Download Episode #133

read more...

It’s rare that you don’t want to “spoil” a trailer. That sounds ridiculous, doesn’t it? Spoiling the very thing that so often spoils the movie itself? But this new trailer for Entrance earns a little reverence. It’s sharp, smart horror shot with a sort of modern casualness that takes practice, and the selling point is a monologue. Not flashy effects or gross-out gore. Just a simple, breathy bit of words leading to the true nature of the speaker’s dangerous intent. This is a goosebump factory. Check it out for yourself:

read more...
  PREVIOUS PAGE
NEXT PAGE  
Twitter button
Facebook button
Google+ button
RSS feed

published: 11.26.2014
B
published: 11.26.2014
B
published: 11.21.2014
D
published: 11.21.2014
B+


Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3