Glengarry Glen Ross

Glengarry Glen Ross

What is Casting Couch? Quite simply, it’s a casting news round-up that takes its name from the place where young actors trade their dignity for a shot at fame. Today we learn who had to service Miss Piggy to get a role in her new film. When everyone thinks of James Foley’s 1992 film adaptation of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross, they think of a bunch of competitive men trying to tear each other’s throats out to get ahead, they think of Alec Baldwin’s testosterone-filled motivational speeches about how coffee is for closers, and generally they think about a bunch of macho posturing and heartless ambition. So Jason Reitman’s latest live reading of a Hollywood script should be fun, because it re-imagines Glengarry by giving it an all-female cast. Who’s he got? According to Inside Movies, his cast will consist of Robin Wright playing the Al Pacino role, Catherine O’Hara the Jack Lemmon one, Maria Bello the Ed Harris one, Allison Janney the Alan Arkin one, and Mae Whitman the Kevin Spacey one. A replacement for Baldwin has yet to be announced, but I think we can all agree that the dream casting would be Beyoncé. The reading takes place at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on February 21.

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We love television, but we love movies more. And we love movies a lot more than awards for television. So, why would we watch the 2012 Emmy Awards when we can just watch any number of this year’s nominees in their great film works, a lot of which are streaming on Netflix. Classics that you’ll find from the Watch Instantly service featuring Emmy nominees include Platoon, Fatal Attraction, Reservoir Dogs, Black Hawk Down, The Terminator and plenty others. But I noticed a bunch of recommended titles with the special circumstance of involving two or more Emmy-nominated talents, including a few from the contending directors. Speaking of which, I could have counted Louis C.K.‘s Pootie Tang, but I still haven’t seen it. Maybe that’s what I’ll be watching this evening. Check out the list and links after the jump.

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Alec Baldwin: Coffee is for Closers

Monologues are to actors what analogies are to bullshit writers who have no idea how to start their list article about monologues. What I mean is that every actor should have a really good understanding on how to perform a monologue – at least I assume so considering that they are the most common tools for auditioning for a part. To someone like myself, who couldn’t act even if Hitler’s death depended on it, I really have no idea what goes into a monologue – however I do know what comes out of a good one. So when I judge the talent of these I’m really just judging how effective they seemed to be, not necessarily the amount of artistic effort that was put into it. Simply put, these are some terrific monologues.

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Don’t you dare talk about Fight Club or something really, really, really bad is going to happen.

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Every week, Landon Palmer and Cole Abaius log on to their favorite chat client of 1996 as OhDaeSu2039 and CatsandDogsLvng2Gether in order to discuss some topical topic of interest. This week, the duo try to avoid the pitfalls of bad novel adaptations by exploring some of the best. How do you take a work by one and turn it into a work by thousands? How do you appease fans while introducing a new audience to the story? Does it always involve whale genitalia? What are the rules of making a great film adaptation of a book?

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Culture Warrior

I was living in New York in September 2008, and took some time a couple of days after the stock market crash to visit way downtown Manhattan and see what was going on. The quietude was shocking, as the alarms being sounded on cable news networks made it sound like I shouldn’t be surprised to see brokers peddling on the street, people running around on fire for no apparent reason, or CEOs segway-ing off of cliffs. As I rarely visited the Financial District, I had no idea whether or not this was normal. Maybe the crash had invoked a necessary meditation or speechlessness, a rare time of reflection for capitalists-run-amok. But the truth was that such panic wouldn’t be visible on the street amongst the common folk (houses around the country owned by low and middle-income families told that story), rather the chaos was happening inside the buildings themselves. Oliver Stone’s latest entry into his “W” trilogy dealing with major 21st century American events (alongside World Trade Center and W.), Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps, is an attempt to inquire on the conversations that may have gone on in those buildings.

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