Filminute

Every year, Filminute challenges filmmakers all over the world to tell a story in 60 seconds. After combing through all the entries, they’ve created a shortlist of 25 films representing 19 different countries this time around. The online festival features a jury led by Richard Linklater that will pick an overall winner, but there’s also a People’s Choice Award, and voting ends this week. For innovation, for cleverness, for brevity — here are 10 entries that deserve recognition for their achievements (and your vote if you think they’ve earned it).

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Late Short Film

Why Watch? This entry from Chong Yuen Ping is direct but effective. A husband comes home to his wife already in the middle of having supper. Plaintive, he promises to her cold shoulder that he’ll change, but there’s something wrong that can’t be fixed. Acted with just the right notes of remorse and solitude, it’s a gut punch that aims slightly higher. We’re partnering again this year with Filminute, and we’ll be featuring a new short film every day this week (that you can go vote for) from the festival which highlights one-minute-long movies and runs through September 30th.

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Death and Life of Desmond Wolfe Short Film

Why Watch? The concept of flipping through brief moments in a person’s life to create a short film is tried and true, which is what makes this outstanding work from Brett Williams and Hayden Phipps that much more impressive. For one, it’s got a beautifully-shot stunt at its core. For two, it subverts that common flash-by-flash exploration of a person’s existence by introducing us to a man who is not at all what he seems. Top-flight in every department, it’s a stirring little shock of a movie. We’re partnering again this year with Filminute, and we’ll be featuring a new short film every day this week (that you can go vote for) from the festival which highlights one-minute-long movies and runs through September 30th.

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Migration Short Film

Why Watch? This short film from Andrey Levkovitch is simple and stunning. It features a flock of red balloons on a snowy field wandering wherever the wind blows them, and while it’s contemplative instead of plot-driven, the final sequence delivers a delightful how-did-he-do-it magic trick of beauty. We’re partnering again this year with Filminute, and we’ll be featuring a new short film every day this week (that you can go vote for) from the festival which highlights one-minute-long movies and runs through September 30th.

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Why Watch? Linus really wants his little brother to stop bothering him while he works on an elaborate system of mirrors for a highly important mission in this funny 60-second-long short from Norway’s Alexander Vestnesstraumen and Ola Martin Fjeld. It’s shot smartly and edited with sharp scissors, but it’s the bombastic score that stands out — driving the drama of this silly, aggravating situation all the way to the punch line. We’re partnering again this year with Filminute, and we’ll be featuring a new short film every day this week (that you can go vote for) from the festival which highlights one-minute-long movies and runs through September 30th.

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The Veil Short Film

Why Watch? Running into a blind alley during the early demonstrations at the start of Egypt’s Arab Spring, a young woman finds brief safety and a bleeding man. Without asking questions, she commits a profound act of humanity and spirituality. Shot with a sense of urgency (and a small camera budget), this 60-second short from Mohamed Salama is about intensity as much as it is about reflection. The only human voices are the disembodied, dream-like chants from the street punctuated by gun shots, and without any dialogue between the leads, it offers a direct signal about the power of actions over words — especially when they are transmitted from one person to another. We’re partnering again this year with Filminute, and we’ll be featuring a new short film every day this week (that you can go vote for) from the festival which highlights one-minute-long movies and runs through September 30th.

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filminute 2013

Filminute is back. The super short film competition is calling for 60-second-long entries from now through August 20th, so sketch out an idea, grab some friends and a camera, and tell your story quickly. And if you think that a minute is frivolous, too short an amount of time to make an effective movie — that’s the challenge of it. To condense your story into something that can be experienced (but not necessarily digested) in a third of the time it takes to microwave a bag of popcorn. Here are the details on how to enter (it’s open to everyone on the planet), and if you’re just looking for inspiration, here’s last year’s winner. No surprise, we’ll be featuring some of the entries on our site. Good luck to all!

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The Best Short Films

Editor’s Note: Today’s entry is done in support of Filminute, a really cool online festival that lets filmmakers tell their stories in 60 seconds or less. Why Watch? Our final Filminute entry is a simple tale of vacation stress painted on an interesting canvas. The filmmakers have taken a sandy beach and drawn their stop-motion film right on top of it. A bit crude, yes, but it makes for a nice afternoon distraction. What will it cost you? Only 1 minute. Skip work. Watch more short films.

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The Best Short Films

Editor’s Note: Today’s entry is done in support of Filminute, a really cool online festival that lets filmmakers tell their stories in 60 seconds or less. Why Watch? This Filminute entry is momentary perfection. In it, a woman carefully, almost joyously makes herself beautiful with a few dabs of make-up. Then, she hits the verge of emotional collapse, and we get to see why. It’s a delicate balance of ideas and a fantastic example of how the camera can be used to deceive. What will it cost you? Only 1 minute. Skip work. Watch more short films.

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The Best Short Films

Editor’s Note: Today’s entry is done in support of Filminute, a really cool online festival that lets filmmakers tell their stories in 60 seconds or less. Why Watch? The symbolism of Macromouse isn’t hard to spot, with its jagged edges and rough cuts of a mouse enjoying a piece of cheese while a trap snaps shut over it. Ending with that old saying about free lunches drives it home, but despite the hammer-to-the-head message, this filminute competitor has strong editing and visuals going for it to tell a complete story. It’s a quick story, and it’s an adorable story, but it’s also incredibly depressing. What will it cost you? Only 1 minute. Skip work. Watch more short films.

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The Best Short Films

Editor’s Note: Today’s entry is done in support of Filminute, a really cool online festival that lets filmmakers tell their stories in 60 seconds or less. Why Watch? Long sweeping shots, a foggy road, a rickety house. These are the elements of Folklore, the super short from Charles Yeager which feels equally like a trailer and as an ominous filmic threat. There’s no story in the traditional sense, but it’s excellent at building an eerie atmosphere and showing off what can be done with limited time and wallet space. What will it cost you? Only 1 minute. Skip work. Watch more short films.

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The Best Short Films

Editor’s Note: Today’s entry is done in support of Filminute, a really cool online festival that lets filmmakers tell their stories in 60 seconds or less. Why Watch? If you watch Brothers, you won’t have to work out today. The Russian short film opens with a young man running staggered and quick down a country road, presumably being chased by nothing. Flashes of the recent past illuminate the danger and combine old memories with new fears. It’s a sharp, relentless piece of filmmaking that ends with the same kind of shock it begins with. It’s a great, visual-centric squeeze to get your heart pumping. What will it cost you? Only 1 minute. Skip work. Watch more short films.

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The Best Short Films

Editor’s Note: Today’s entry is done in support of Filminute, a really cool online festival that lets filmmakers tell their stories in 60 seconds or less.  Why Watch? How many short film directors does it take to screw in a lightbulb? Munir Alper Dogan‘s answers with minimalist charm. This is story at its least complicated – there’s a problem followed by a solution. Although it ends with a great visual, the rest of the film does its best to create a sense of what’s going on even with overpowering darkness. It succeeds in varying degrees. Overall, it’s tough to understand why this particular moment has been captured in a movie, but maybe the answer lies somewhere in the stone-stillness of our hero at the opening or the blinded flash of surprise he shows at the end. What will it cost you? Only 1 minute. Skip work. Watch more short films.

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Editor’s Note: Today’s entry is done in support of Filminute, a really cool online festival that lets filmmakers tell their stories in 60 seconds or less. It’s the first of seven, so keep an eye out. Why Watch? A camera floats through a nursing home following a nurse carrying a tray while a narrator explains the bullet points of his life. Hol vs Rus is an enigmatic title until the film’s punchline – which acts as a sort of anti-pretension antidote to the ephemeral nature of the rest of the (minute-long) runtime. It’s a wink during existential pondering. It’s airy, but ultimately a delightful bite of what might be a larger tale; it could very well be the opening to a lost, Russian Wes Anderson film.  Plus, the visual approach – while simple – is a refreshing use of misdirection. What will it cost you? Only 1 minute. Skip work. Watch more short films.

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Filminute Festival

If you only had a minute to tell a story, what would you say? Would it be enough time to express great human sorrow? A gut-punch of a laugh? As it turns out, filmmakers from all over the world achieve this feat every year at the Filminute International One-Minute Film Festival. Currently in its 7th year, executive director John Ketchum is once again issuing the challenge to everyone to deliver a strong movie in only a minute. It seemed only fair to give him a single minute to pitch his film festival. We go slightly over, but maybe that’s just more proof of tough the challenge is. The online festival will run during the month of September, and you can check out the entire proceedings at Filminute’s website, but for now, here’s Ketchum with a bit about their philosophy and what you can expect. Check out the incredibly brief interview below: Download This Interview Enjoy More Reject Radio

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Filminute

Filminute, the International One-Minute Film Festival, is looking for filmmakers who can cram their vision into 60 seconds or less. It’s a compelling challenge for everyone except the 5-second film team. For them, this would be epic. But if you have a camera and an idea that’s collapsable, they’re hungry for your work. You’ve got to have it into them by August 20th, so get crackin’. For more information, check out their call for entries. For inspiration, check out their highly inspirational Pinterest page. For short films of all sizes, feel free to peruse our curated collection. If you’re not filmmaking-ly inclined, this is the kind of short attention span festival that is perfect for all sorts of spectators, and we’ll be hosting a handful of the shorts that make the cut and play at the festival. Keep an eye out for those later in the month.

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