Film Business

The middle class in China is a juggernaut that has been growing steadily for at least the past decade. It was only a matter of time before a foreign-sales-obsessed studio world moved in to deliver the content that the hungry giant has an appetite for. Warner Bros. is officially the first to break into the People’s Republic of China to offer their films On Demand through television. According to a press release, Warner Bros. will be partnering with You On Demand (complete with its creepy, winky-face logo) to provide Pay-Per-View movies to an estimated potential 200 million households. The films become available this summer, and by the end of the season, You On Demand anticipates their service will be in 3 million households – the equivalent of some of the top cable providers here in the US. This is a large opportunity for the studio financially, of course, but what’s more fascinating is the door it leaves open for a US-based studio to start producing movies specifically for a foreign market. Hollywood is already highly aware of the global market and have catered more and more to foreign markets by making tentpole films more generic (and thus easy to digest in any culture or language), but with a direct line into the homes of the Chinese people, Warner Bros. might see an incentive to bypass American audiences altogether and start making a few movies every year specifically aimed at China. That’s just speculation, but it doesn’t seem too far fetched. […]

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Over the weekend, discounted tickets through Groupon helped The Lincoln Lawyer‘s box office numbers, which once again draws the question of ticket prices back into the forefront. It’s no secret that ticket prices are a cause for concern for both movie fans (like us) who feel hoodwinked by inflated prices of admission and movie studios who, despite record-breaking years recently, still want to make more money. Since lowering prices wholesale is apparently not an option, another solution has to be found, and Steve Zeitchik over at the LA Times gives about as smart and in-depth an exploration of flexible ticket pricing as you could hope for. Just like hotels and airfare, the movies that aren’t popular become cheaper while the huge hype of blockbusters comes with a bigger price tag. While a movie like Limitless starts to sell out, the prices go up, but as ticket sales for Paul stay low, the price drops. It’s almost as simple as that.

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With recent events involving fresh piracy lawsuits, and people vehemently defending their right to steal, it’s important to check out what filmmakers think about piracy. In the case of Kiowa Winans and Rhett Reese, it’s not as black and white as you’d think.

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So you’ve been thinking about quitting your job at Steak N Shake? A position just opened up that might interest you!

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Expect to see more political documentaries in the near future. Also expect to see more campaign ads pretending to be documentaries in the near future.

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BestOfdiscussion

Every publication (including this one) is stuffing their Best Of lists down your throat. The Rejects want to turn the tables and ask what YOU think the best movies of the decade were. Give your (adjusted for inflation) three cents inside…

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This week, on a very special episode of Reject Radio, we avoid getting hit by a volcano. By. That. Much.

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mgm-header

While driving around your neighborhood in two weeks or so, you might be drawn in by the allure of a poster board sign pointing you in the direction of a nearby garage sale where you can get a bag of clothes for $1, a VHS of Zeus and Roxanne for $1, and MGM for a negotiable price.

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buydvds-header

Basically a new DVD/Blu-ray would be released for sale only both online and on the shelves at Target, Wal-Mart, etc. If you want to see it, you have to buy it… or wait the additional few weeks for the sale-only window to close so you can rent it from your DVD peddler of choice.

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Discuss-DVDTheater

Despite this being highly unscientific, I’m curious to know whether to base my new bootlegging business in theater lobbies. (FSR does not condone bootlegging or standing around in theater lobbies).

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With everyone clamoring to get more 3D movies in theaters and not enough screens to hold them, it’s a crucial time to either invest more or take a step back and question whether 3D is really going to last a while this time.

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theweinsteincompany

So it turns out that The Weinstein Company is in a little financial trouble. Maybe. At least that’s what it seems like. Let’s take a quick look and try to make sense of it all.

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Hollywood Sign

In most jobs, if you don’t produce quality work for a third of the year, you get fired. In Hollywood, however, you twiddle your thumbs and wait for Summer.

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