Father of the Bride

Father of the Bride

In the 1995 sequel to the charming 1991 comedy, Father of the Bride, a crazed George Banks (Steve Martin) is thrown into a dizzy (his default state, at least going on his behavior in the previous film) when he discovers that both his wife (Diane Keaton) and his daughter (Kimberly Williams-Paisley) are pregnant at the exact same time. George, never one to roll with the punches, freaks the heck out and is only cowed when Keaton’s ever-lovely Nina kicks him out and he gets a glimpse of what his life would look like without her (and, because he’s behaved so badly, probably also without their kids, their grandkids, and their sweet son-in-law). Nina is the brains of the Banks operation, a steadying force that somehow manages to weather every storm with grace and style. George, well, isn’t like that at all. The formula for the second Father of the Bride film wasn’t entirely original — again, it was still all about George not being able to handle big life changes — but the feature wasn’t afraid to go with a slightly offbeat and surprisingly progressive plotline. George and Nina were about to become grandparents just as they were becoming actual parents again, and although George couldn’t handle most of the action, the film didn’t smack of ageism or anything of the sort — it seemed like the Banks clan was creating a new, modern family, even though it was one that happened sort of accidentally. If Father of the Bride is going to continue on, why […]

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molly weasley in action

Moms have been an important part of cinema since the beginning, as one of the first humans to appear in a film was Sarah Whitley, mother-in-law of inventor/director Louis Le Prince, in the extremely short 1888 work Roundhay Garden Scene. Since then, we’ve had mothers serving important roles in quintessential masterpieces of Soviet cinema (Mother), Bollywood (Mother India), experimental film (Window Water Baby Moving), animated features (Bambi, Dumbo, etc.), documentary (Grey Gardens), political thriller (The Manchurian Candidate), science fiction (The Terminator), horror (Psycho, Friday the 13th, Carrie, etc.), comedy (The Graduate) and of course melodrama (the whole maternal subgenre). And we’ve all grown up identifying with certain movie moms, and actresses who often played moms; for me they were usually portrayed by Teri Garr, Melinda Dillon, Dee Wallace Stone and Diane Wiest. Therefore it would be an enormous task and read if I were to attempt to either list all or narrow down the best movie moms ever let alone handpick only a handful of scenes we love involving matriarchs. So I’ve asked the other FSR writers to help out by selecting a single maternal character they favor, and with one from yours truly included we honor ten of these varied women below.

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Earlier today screen legend Elizabeth Taylor passed away due to congestive heart failure. She was 79. People deal with death in different ways. If you’re one of those people who needs to wallow in good memories afterward, or it you are just woefully undereducated when it comes to the career of the late actress, then TCM is putting on a marathon of Taylor movies that should be essential viewing. The marathon will begin April 10th, starting at 6 am ET, and it is set to run for a full 24 hours. Over the course of the marathon many of Taylor’s best remembered performances will be aired, including the two that won her Oscar statues, her sexy portrayal of femme fatale Gloria Wandrous in BUtterfield 8, and her tortured performance as Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? The marathon in tribute of the great actress will run as follows:

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Ten Chick Flicks Guys Can Like Too

In the interest of keeping us sane while being deluged with romantic comedies and period pieces, here’s a list guys can use next time they’re at the video store with their significant other. When in doubt, check out one of these chick flicks that are safe for guys to like too.

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