Elias Koteas

mars

It’s not often that a director will amass a fanbase before he’s ever even helmed a feature, but that’s exactly what Ruairi Robinson managed to do, thanks to the buzz that surrounded his short films like The Silent City and BlinkyTM. Movie pundits have been predicting for years now that Robinson is a future name in the world of genre films, and now he’s getting his chance to prove them right, because his first feature, The Last Days on Mars, is ready to be released in the UK on September 19, and has put together a trailer to promote the occasion. In addition to watching it because of the buzz surrounding Robinson, you’re also going to want to give this trailer a chance if you enjoy biology-based horror movies, or thrillers in space, or when the two come together in something like Alien. And you’re going to want to check it out to appreciate the cast that Robinson has put together, who aren’t close to being A-listers, but who are really underrated talents down to the last performer. Robinson is probably really good at making mix-tapes. I’m jealous of all his teenage crushes. Click through for some Liev Schreiber goodness.

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This week, Fat Guy Kevin Carr grabs a protest sign and a test so he can occupy something. All the big cities are taken, so he decides to Occupy Hollywood, but being one of the 99%, he can’t afford a plane ticket from Ohio to California. So, he occupies his local multiplex, squatting in the front of their biggest screen. There, he has a chance to check out the loosely-related Tower Heist and later drinks some spiked egg nog and wanders into a later screening of A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas. At least that’s what he’s telling the authorities.

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The Policeman is a cypher. It’s a character that has practically everything going on internally. On the outside, he seems like a run-of-the-mill cop, but he isn’t. There’s a genuine warmth and sadness to Elias Koteas’ performance in Let Me In. He’s someone who’s way in over his head and doesn’t grasp what’s really going on. In any other film this would’ve been the character trying to ruin the kid’s fun and more so played as a villain, but he’s not. If anything, The Policeman is the most sympathetic character on screen. He never does anything wrong and there’s nothing morally questionable about him, unlike every other character in the film. Let Me In is an odd film in that it isn’t completely black and white. Nobody is singled out as good or bad, except perhaps The Policeman, who also plays into some very subtle religious undertones as well. Koteas brings a sympathy to a character that easily could’ve been played as the bad guy. Here’s what Elias Koteas had to say about his role in Let Me In, satanism, and working with some of the most talented directors still working today.

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It’s cold, and there’s blood on the ground. There are empty streets to get lost in, but there’s a monster on the loose. Let Me In is nearly relentless in its tone of isolation and the chance of finding friendship in the eye of the puberty hurricane. There are few warm moments that emerge out of the kid’s eye view, and they’re as beautiful as the silence. In fact, the whole movie is an exercise in the careful crafting of something we can all relate to by using something none of us can. Owen (Kodi Smit-McPhee) is bullied at school, left alone by a mother more wrapped up in her own impending divorce, and concerned mostly with eating Now And Laters and acting tough with a kitchen knife in front of his mirror. Abby (Chloe Moretz) moves into the building, and Owen’s life changes. He has finally found a friend. And that friend needs blood to survive.

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Chloe Moretz in Let Me In

For Cloverfield director Matt Reeves, the road to remaking one of the most prized international thrillers of the past decade has been a bumpy one. Speculation, skepticism and the ability of fankind to hold tight to the original has caused unrest over the mere idea that they would remake Let The Right One In so soon. That, and how can you improve upon near-perfection? But with this first international trailer for the remake, titled Let Me In, he’s taking a big step in the right direction.

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Just as Matthew Vaughn’s Kick-Ass will introduce us to psychotic children in masks and costumes, fighting crime despite their clear lack of any super-powers, Peter Stebbings’ Defendor will do the same for adult wackos.

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‘I Come With The Rain’ opens with someone beating the crap out of Josh Hartnett with a baseball bat. Sounds like a missed opportunity for the marketing department doesn’t it? You probably would have heard of the movie if that scene was the entire trailer.

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haunting-in-conn

The only thing haunting about The Haunting in Connecticut is how similar it is to every other haunted house movie of the last three decades.

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published: 12.18.2014
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published: 12.17.2014
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published: 12.15.2014
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published: 12.12.2014
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