Dom Hemingway

Jude Law and Richard Grant in DOM HEMINGWAY

Dom Hemingway opens with the eponymous character locked away in prison receiving oral pleasure from a fellow inmate. While the inmate continues satisfying Hemingway (Jude Law), our protagonist delivers a rousing monologue about the aesthetic merits of his cock — comparing his genitals to the transformative works of Renoir and Van Gogh. Coincidentally this terribly overlong introduction is prophetic in nature. Like the rambling speech, Richard Shepard’s initially amusing, genre-less piece of filmmaking tragically expends its virtues thin by about the 30-minute mark. Law plays an infamous safecracker who has spent the last 12 years of his life in a prison cell. His sentence could’ve been reduced, but Hemingway was a loyal soldier and kept his mouth shut when the authorities asked him to rat out his accomplices. But silence has a price. Aside from being locked in captivity for a dozen years, Hemingway has missed out on the childhood of his daughter Evelyn (Emilia Clarke), subsequently losing his his wife and everything he built.

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Richard Shepard and Jude Law on set of DOM HEMINGWAY

Director Richard Shepard makes tonally risky choices. The Matador and The Hunting Party are broad comedies, but they also focus on characters with serious problems. Shepard doesn’t play those personal conflicts as jokes, either. He takes their predicaments very seriously, no matter how goofy his characters may act. These three dramatic comedies, including his latest film, Dom Hemingway, are driven by the loss of a loved one. In the case of Dom Hemingway, the narrative is also propelled by a potbellied, foul mouth, unhinged and egotistical safe-cracker named Dom Hemingway (Jude Law). This is a man who loves his name, himself, and, of course, his cock. You read that last part right. The film opens with Dom discussing what a wonderful piece of equipment he has. Needless to say, he’s a magnetic character who is, maybe not a good person, but someone you root for, if only because he knows how to talk about himself to exhaustive lengths. We discussed with writer-director Shepard how he made this incredibly flawed protagonist so damn appealing:

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A24

We’re not even halfway into 2014 and already this is proving to be a terrific year for movies. In March alone we had a slew of quality films: Enemy, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Raid 2, and Bad Words. This month is even better. What’s nice about this March and April is that they’ve given us some quality blockbusters that we’d expect from the summer without having to wait for the heat. While Noah had its flaws — a lot of them, to be exact — it was a grand and ambitious drama with the scope of a summer movie. A more consistent summer film is opening this week, and if you pay any attention to the world, you know which. A hint: it’s the one about a super soldier who was frozen for over 60 years and is now fighting a man with a metal arm that’ll make a gazillion dollars. The movie, not the guy with the metal arm. Not sure what his day rate is. The Marvel juggernaut isn’t the only movie you need to see this month, though. There are two movies in particular that will surely stand the test of time: Under the Skin and Only Lovers Left Alive. Those are experiences, not just movies. Before the busy summer movie season begins, make sure to make the time for them, in addition to these other eight Must See Movies:

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alexandre-desplat

Even though “Please Mr. Kennedy” is probably still stuck in most people’s heads, it is officially a new year full of films with music that will move us to tears, make us cheer, make us smile, or simply introduce us to something different. Sometimes a movie won’t hit all the marks, but the music will be unforgettable and other times the music ends up being the element that makes a film by tying all the other elements together. After looking over the titles set to hit theaters this year, the following 15 are the ones to keep your ears open for. From well-known composers embarking on new collaborations to popular artists once again taking to the stand to musicians stepping away from their usual genres into something new,  the upcoming year is poised to deliver films boasting an eclectic array of tunes. If you are still looking for something to use those holiday iTunes gift cards on, get ready to add these upcoming scores and soundtracks to your playlists for 2014.

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Dom Hemingway

After 12 years in prison for keeping his mouth shut to protect his mobster boss, Dom Hemingway (Jude Law) is back on the streets and looking for one or two ways to celebrate. Can you really blame him? Richard Shepard‘s Dom Hemingway follows the titular ex-con, a safecracker, as he travels to his boss’ (Demian Bichir) palacial estate to get what he’s owed for his loyalty. As you can see, it’s a fantastic prize, but it looks like Hemingway should have learned by now that things don’t generally work out in his favor. With no money, no girl, and no place to go, he decides the time is just super for reconnecting with his estranged daughter (Emilia Clarke) and getting 12 years of anger and the insatiable need to party out of his system in a matter of days. The trailer is a fantastic montage of Law in a drunken haze, doing things like humping a safe open, swimming fully clothed with a cigarette hanging out of his mouth and traipsing through a field stark naked (prominently featured: Jude Law’s extremely white butt). But while the trailer shows all of his fun, post-prison hijinks, it feels like the film is going to take a more serious turn just as this little glimpse ends. Eventually, he’s going to have to put the liquor bottle down and deal with the fact that he’s been gone for the last 12 years – especially with his daughter and grandchild. Maybe Bichir will have to answer […]

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a_560x0

Elegant white lettering reads: “Jude Law is Dom Hemingway, and you’re not.” Law himself slouches in a plush, lipstick-red seat, equipped with a drink and a smoke and a nasty sneer. High above Law sits a portrait of a baboon, proud and refined in all the ways Law isn’t. The poster for Law’s new film, Dom Hemingway, wants to create an image that’s totally unique. And it succeeds…sort of. Law’s self-important shtick doesn’t seem particularly new or different, but his primate artwork most definitely is. Plenty of posters put their lead characters (complete with an over-the-top personality) front and center, but far fewer posters devote half their allotted space to a baboon and refuse to explain the baboon’s presence. Dom Hemingway‘s second poster lacks baboon and therefore lacks the same level of interest. The only thing on display is an abundance of cheeky British wit, and the exact same sneer Law was sporting from under his primate pal. Check it out after the break, along with a new still from the film.

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