David Morse

McCanick

One of the most buzzed-about films that will debut at the Toronto International Film Festival next month is Josh C. Waller‘s McCanick, which features recently deceased Glee star Cory Monteith in one of his last roles. Monteith plays a drug addict who took a secret with him about Detective Eugene McCanick (David Morse) when he was locked up. Now that he’s back on the streets, McCanick is overcome with paranoia and will do anything to stop the information from being exposed by the man he helped put away. The role is especially poignant because Monteith died from a heroin overdose after a lifetime stuggle with substance abuse and addiction. But morbid fascination aside, he seems to be holding his own in a genre that strays far, far away from his usual fare of “sing about our feelings” – which was his intention. Monteith was 31, and couldn’t keep playing a teenager forever. As for Morse, playing a deranged, paranoid cop sure does look like fun. Check out the latest trailer after the break.

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McCanick

When news broke late Saturday night that Glee star Cory Monteith had been found dead in his Vancouver hotel room, fans were shocked at the news of the thirty-one-year-old actor’s untimely death. Monteith, known for playing lovable jock-turned-artist Finn Hudson on the Fox hit musical, seemed as bubbly and healthy as the young adult he portrayed. In his downtime from Glee, Monteith was apparently busy building up his film career, including a role in Josh C. Waller‘s upcoming McCanick, a gritty crime drama. The story focuses on a drug-addicted street hustler (Monteith) who clashes with a detective determined to take him down (David Morse). Waller says he was initially reluctant to cast Monteith in the role, but the actor’s determination to get the part, as well as his connection to the role, changed the director’s mind. Monteith was very open about his past problems with substance abuse and addiction in his youth, and recently completed a stay in rehab earlier this year. “He was very vocal about his past, and said he wanted to tap into things from his youth that he hadn’t been able to use as an actor yet,” Waller said. “He didn’t say it was a cathartic experience, but you could sense it.” Though McCanick will ultimately be Monteith’s last role, he also shot the comedy-drama All The Wrong Reasons during Glee’s offseason. He plays the manager of a department store resisting the temptation to cheat on his wife. Neither film has a release date at this time, but […]

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wwz07

Spoilers Ahead: This article contains advanced talking points for Marc Forster‘s World War Z. We recommend reading it after you see the film. I know. It’s pretty futile starting up a list of unanswered questions regarding a popcorn flick about vaguely defined zombies co-written by Damon Lindelof. But just because something is futile doesn’t mean it can’t be fun. I haven’t read the original book by Max Brooks, which apparently doesn’t matter given how little the movie resembles the text. I also haven’t followed every little piece of the production, but that shouldn’t matter either since the movie on screen should stand alone. However, where there is some relevance to explaining something on screen by the issues of the rewrites and reshoots and such, so I do try to mention it if I’m aware of it. Speaking of the infamous production problems, they do tend to factor into narrative flaws and holes and confusion like those I raise below. Additionally the expectation that the story of World War Z will continue in sequels means the filmmakers might be choosing to flesh out some stuff later on. And of course, as usual, some of the questions are not answerable at all because they’re more criticisms in the form of a hypothetical query or simply disagreements with how the movie was plotted or how the characters thought or acted. All in all, let these talking points first and foremost serve as a means to discuss the movie in full without concern for spoilers.

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Are you a recently defrosted human from the year 1999 that woke up in the thirtieth century? If so, then do I have some news for you… Comedy Central has ordered two more seasons of Futurama for a total of a twenty six episode order. Each season will contain thirteen episodes, clearly the return of the show last year drew even stronger ratings than anyone realized, because it takes a bomb under the feet of a television executive to get an order this high. And to be honest, I would not put that out of the realm of possibility for Bender Bending Rodriguez. It took about five episodes to get its footing back, but once Futurama started delivering episodes, some of which surpassed the quality of the original run from FOX, it never stopped. So I’m more than welcoming of another season, and the fact that we can guarantee Futurama through 2013 is more than a happy surprise for the day. But unfortunately that news is counter balanced with the unfortunate announcement that FX has decided not to pick up the critically acclaimed boxing series Lights Out for a second season. This news though tragic does not come as a surprise considering the ratings were only slightly higher than Terriers, and like Terriers, the show was never able to cross the one million mark in ratings beyond the airing of the pilot in January.

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It’s been a week since Lights and Death Row went through a glass window courtesy of well, each other. The fight is on and the date is set, but this week Lights has much bigger fish to fry. While on an errand run with his sister, Lights runs into a old friend and retired boxer. But this is no ordinary run in, because this old friend can barely remember what he ate for breakfast that morning. And things get even worse when Lights learns that one of his “favors” has come back to bite him in the ass.

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Movies We Love

The year was 1998 and Michael Bay’s Armageddon was in the middle of sweeping the box office and Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan was just hitting it. But in a cluster of giant blockbusters sat a film from acclaimed music video director F. Gary Gray. It was his third feature and starred Samuel L. Jackson and Kevin Spacey. Yes, I’m talking about that amazing action/thriller known as The Negotiator. Danny Roman is the Chicago Police Department’s best hostage negotiator, and seems to be on an unstoppable reign of high profile cases. But things do a complete one eighty when his partner Nate is found dead in his car. Danny is now the prime suspect in a case that goes all the way to the top. His only recourse is to take over the CPD’s internal affairs headquarters in an attempt to unravel the mystery of his frame job. His only demand? A fellow hostage negotiator named Chris Sabian.

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