David Mamet

2014 is shaping up to be the Year of Kevin Hart. The actor’s steady rise to fame has landed him major roles in four films next year – Grudge Match, Ride Along, About Last Night, and Think Like a Man Too. Now all he needs to do is lay low after 2014, pop back up twelve years later for another Year of Kevin Hart, and he might finally become part of the Chinese zodiac. But twelve years is a long time to wait, so entertain yourselves with the newest trailer for About Last Night:

read more...

Frankenstein 1931

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya?

read more...

review ricky jay deceptive

Magic, like many of the arts, seems to ebb and flow through our culture with its impact and essence growing and shrinking in importance from year to year. Of course, magic probably does far more of the latter. There was a brief resurgence a few years ago with the likes of David Blaine and Criss Angel, but both men quickly became well-deserved punchlines, leaving magic to hole up in the last place on Earth that still sees it as, well, magical. But outside of Las Vegas? Ricky Jay is one of a very select few who’ve not only made a living from their magic-related interests but also found success beyond the stage. (Penn & Teller are two more, but after that I’m stumped unless you count David Copperfield’s brief foray into acting with Terror Train. Which you shouldn’t.) Jay’s incredible sleight-of-hand skills, fascination with history, sharp sense of humor and distinctive voice have kept him working, educating and entertaining us for decades. A new doc offers a glimpse up Jay’s metaphorical shirt sleeves for a better look at what makes him tick, but unfortunately it does so by pointing the camera outwards.

read more...

Kevin Hart in Think Like a Man

According to Deadline Hollywood, Steve Pink (Accepted, Hot Tub Time Machine) is in talks to direct a remake of About Last Night… which will take the original David Mamet play’s title as its own. So, in all fairness, Sexual Perversity in Chicago isn’t so much a remake as it is a second adaptation of the Mamet play. Only 237 more to go before he reaches Shakespeare status. The movie, written by Leslye Headland (Bachelorette), has Michael Ealy and Kevin Hart set to co-star and Regina Hall rumored for a third role. The production is still looking for the second female lead. Here’s where I go out on a limb, so hear me out. The studious will notice that all three acting talents involved are 1) great at what they do and 2) all African-American. Thus, Screen Gems has a unique opportunity here, and I sincerely hope that they will not bury this project with niche-only marketing that hits the Tyler Perry sweet spot without reaching out organically to a broad base. Yes, I see the irony in me pointing out the obvious in order to ask Screen Gems not to point out the obvious, but there’s no reason they shouldn’t give the kind of advertising money necessary to treat this like anything other than a standard romantic dramedy. Except, you know, history.

read more...

Recently, our own Nathan Adams bemoaned comedian-turned-actor Kevin Hart’s decision to sign on to Valet Guys, as a sidekick to Kevin James in a surely unfunny Kevin James vehicle. But while that was perhaps a bad idea on Hart’s part, we should not forget Hart’s other recent project pick-up: a buddy cop comedy with Seth Rogen that has a misleading and/or totally brilliant tagline. Paired with today’s announcement that Hart is taking cues from Jim Belushi, it seems as if the funny man is seriously interested in mixing up his comedic outings – and, as is so rare when it comes to talking about Jim Belushi’s career cues (Snow Buddies, really?), that’s probably a fantastic idea. THR reports that Hart has joined the cast of Screen Gems’ remake of About Last Night. The 1986 film was directed by Edward Zwick and comes from no less than David Mamet‘s play, Sexual Perversity in Chicago. The film centered on a pair of twentysomethings (Rob Lowe and Demi Moore) who have a one night stand and attempt to make an actual go of it (in the form of a real relationship). All sorts of things bog them down – especially their disapproving best pals (played originally by Belushi and Elizabeth Perkins) who have no bones about trying to break them up.

read more...

Every week, Landon Palmer and Cole Abaius log on to their favorite chat client of 1996 as OhDaeSu2039 and CatsandDogsLvng2Gether in order to discuss some topical topic of interest. This week, the duo try to avoid the pitfalls of bad novel adaptations by exploring some of the best. How do you take a work by one and turn it into a work by thousands? How do you appease fans while introducing a new audience to the story? Does it always involve whale genitalia? What are the rules of making a great film adaptation of a book?

read more...

Spartan (2004) You need to set your motherfucker to receive. Synopsis Val Kilmer plays Bobby Scott, a selection member for an elite and very secretive branch of the military. His methods are anything but traditional, but his results are definite. When he is called in to help the secret service search for the missing daughter of a high-ranking government official (you can just assume that official is the President, though it’s never openly said), Scott soon realizes there is anything but a standard kidnapping taking place. Why We Love It In a word: Mamet. The story behind Spartan could have been handled with the minimal amount of effort put into characters and dialogue, and it probably could have still worked given a decent director and fine actors. This being a David Mamet films, you know you’re getting more than anything typical especially in terms of dialogue. The lines in Spartan crack like a whip and give you much insight into the characters who are delivering them.

read more...

This week on Print to Projector, we dream cast the anthology masterwork of J.D. Salinger and enjoy some bananafish.

read more...

Chuwetel Ejiofor in Redbelt

The overall writing is fluent, and the performance by Ejiofor is near perfect. It doesn’t shatter the earth nor does it revolutionize the martial arts subgenre, but it is the work of a storyteller rather than the work of an action junkie director; and the end result is refreshing.

read more...
Some movie websites serve the consumer. Some serve the industry. At Film School Rejects, we serve at the pleasure of the connoisseur. We provide the best reviews, interviews and features to millions of dedicated movie fans who know what they love and love what they know. Because we, like you, simply love the art of the moving picture.
Fantastic Fest 2014
6 Filmmaking Tips: James Gunn
Got a Tip? Send it here:
editors@filmschoolrejects.com
Publisher:
Neil Miller
Managing Editor:
Scott Beggs
Associate Editors:
Rob Hunter
Kate Erbland
Christopher Campbell
All Rights Reserved © 2006-2014 Reject Media, LLC | Privacy Policy | Design & Development by Face3