David Cronenberg

Thanks to Netflix, it has become easier to watch controversial movies at home, but it’s also harder to find the quality. Often times a movie’s description is more misleading than helpful and may lead a person to feel duped once the credits have rolled. Following the website-generated suggestions only takes you so far—or right into the awaiting arms of something too line-crossing for a newbie – and a quick Google search turns up pages and pages of porn. I think it’s time someone makes this search a little less difficult. Yes, there are tons of lists out there compiled by reputable sites detailing which sex-centric movies are the quintessential, the most titillating, and even the most disgusting, but what if you just want to put your toe into the sex movie pool? You can have a movie that’s all about sex but doesn’t have one hot sex scene or a drop of chemistry in it…hello Last Tango in Paris!

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Every day, come rain or shine or internet tubes breaking, Film School Rejects showcases a trailer from the past. What’s this trailer working on? A machine that will transport Jeff Goldblum from one side of the room to another. In a word? Teleportation. But the machine demands inner pure. He was not pure. Now, his medicine cabinet has become the Brundle Museum of Natural History. Wanna see what else is inside it? Think you know what it is? Check out the trailer after the jump.

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Somewhere out there, a movie geek already lamenting the death of exclusivity and the sacrosanct nature of heroes just broke into the tears he or she has been holding back. “That guy from Twilight” is going to be in a movie with the director of Videodrome. According to The Wrap, the young actor will replace Colin Farrell as the star of Cosmopolis – playing Eric Packer, an insanely wealthy man who treks across a huge slightly-futuristic metropolis while someone’s trying to assassinate him. There will be speculation about whether this will help Pattinson move beyond Twilight, but…he already has. He’s been in two minorly successful indie flicks, and he’s appearing in Water for Elephants later this year. In fact, there are probably a ton of people out there that don’t even think of him as the Twilight guy either because they haven’t seen the movies (and also don’t own Hello Kitty merchandise of any kind) or because they’ve seen his other work. This sounds like a great pairing, and an opportunity for Cronenberg to rip a great performance from a fairly sleepy actor who can’t seem to express emotion beyond lovesick irritation. Colin Farrell would have been better, but Pattinson will be more interesting.

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As the only literate Reject, it’s my duty to find the latest, the greatest and the untouched classics that would make great source material for film adaptations. I read so you don’t have to. This week, Print to Projector presents the story of a man buried alive buried alive in his car trapped in space stuck between two boulders stranded in between two highways on a small grass island where his survival and sanity depend on a few cases of wine and the sheer will to live.

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Criterion Files

Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence is a truly unique film by several definitions. Japanese master filmmaker Nagisa Oshima’s first English-language film (and it is worth noting here that much of it is in Japanese) embodies some dense discourses about Japanese identity, yet in many respects this is a film without a nation. But that’s exactly the point, for Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence embodies a host of contradictions in terms of how we’re used to experiencing films of its relative ilk: it is a film about war, yet it is never about patriotism or combat; it is a film about an intersection of cultures, yet it never seeks to deliver a message of sameness of common ground; and it is a film about sexual tensions between males, yet homosexuality is never explicitly addressed in a way that would place it fittingly in the canon of “queer cinema.”

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Criterion Files

Landon and Adam usually have the lock down on all things Criterion, but lately I’ve been inundated by the important films of old times and new. First it was the package I received from my good friend Travon who took advantage of the Barnes and Noble 50% off sale and his last few days before heading back to Iraq to fight for our freedoms to send The Red Shoes, Paths of Glory and House my way. And, no, there’s nothing ironic about an American soldier sending me movies from the UK and Japan. That’s what this country is all about. In addition to that bountiful harvest, I was also invited to blather on inanely for the Criterion Cast – the podcast whose title is incredibly self-descriptive. That Criterion Cast gang and I were talking Videodrome – one of the best films of all time featuring a chest vagina. Of course, the conversation covered our fears of technology, the future-casting from Cronenberg, and the likelihood that we’ll all grow new VHS-compatible sex organs (hint: we will). Even with my inclusion, the episode is a fascinating one, and I highly encourage you to check it out over at the Criterion Cast site. Then bookmark the site to further bask yourself in the warm glow of film love with future episodes.

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For 36 days straight, we’ll be exploring the famous 36 Dramatic Situations by presenting a film that exemplifies each one. From family killing family to prisoners in need of asylum, we brush off the 19th century list in order to remember that it’s still incredibly relevant today.

Whether you’re seeking a degree in Literature, love movies, or just love seeing things explode, our feature should have something for everyone. If it doesn’t, please don’t make us watch as your body parts fall off.

Part 27 of the 36-part series takes a look at “Fatal Imprudence” with The Fly.

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Welcome back to Junkfood Cinema; eat up while it’s still free! If you are unfamiliar with this column, congratulations on retaining all of your IQ points. Junkfood Cinema is where, every week, I bring the cinematic pain in the form of some truly bad films. While these movies lack a certain…everything, there are aspects of each of them that I can’t help but enjoy.

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Another day comes, and another opportunity for us to lay down some of the day’s hot news stories is upon is. But instead, we begin your Thursday with The B-Roll. Or as we like to say, “And now, for something completely different.”

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Hot off success with The Brood, the shocking director has chosen psychic horror for his next. But what does that mean for Frankenstein?

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Earthling

We’ve covered foreign horror, cult horror, and documentaries focusing on exploitation cinema and the war-crimes against Sci-Fi perpetrated by George Lucas. Earthling marks the first narrative Sci-Fi film I’ve seen at the festival. It also marks the first film so far that I have disliked.

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‘Splice’ recycles a lot of horror movie conventions, but does so in a unique, genuinely weird way.

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culturewarrior-horror60

1960 changed horror filmmaking forever. Don’t believe me? Read on.

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RachelWeiszKarynKusama

The director of Jennifer’s Body is looking for a new playmate, and Rachel Weisz is the right woman for the gender-bending job.

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Don

Everyone just calm down. Put the entire bottle of luudes away. It’s going to be alright. Or maybe it won’t. Instead of threatening self-inflicted bodily harm, just rant about how stupid this remake will be inside. Long live the old new flesh.

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cronenberg-romero

A new trend appeared this week with famed directors trading in the clapboards and megaphones for inkwells and laptops.

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tom_cruise

Two major stars will go head to head in a Cronenberg spy thriller. Sadly, it seems unlikely that Cruise will grow a chest vagina.

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timecrimes_header

Foreign Objects travels the world of international cinema each week to look for films worth visiting. So renew your passport, get your shots, and brush up on the local age of legal consent, this week we’re heading to… Spain!

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Aaron Boone is a troubled young man who may or may not be responsible for a series of brutal murders…

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Frank Carveth shares custody of his daughter with his estranged wife, Nola, and one day finds bruises and welts on the little girl’s body after a visit with her mother.

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published: 11.26.2014
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published: 11.26.2014
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published: 11.21.2014
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published: 11.21.2014
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