Cold Comes The Night

Franco Nero is Space Jesus in THE VISITOR

Welcome back to This Week In Discs! If you see something you like, click on the title to buy it from Amazon. The Visitor John Huston and Jesus Christ (Franco Nero) are in a never-ending war with Satan, and their latest battleground is Atlanta, GA, where the soul of a child holds the key to saving the universe. Probably. Lance Henriksen, Glenn Ford, Shelley Winters, and Sam Peckinpah join in the fun as Huston struggles to stop the girl’s descent into evil and tendency towards causing bodily harm. It’s hardly news to say that this thirty four year old movie is a mental fingerbang that bends genres and somehow teases both brilliance and stupidity, but I’m saying it anyway. Both highly derivative and wholly original, the film cherry picks elements from The Omen, The Fury, Phantasm, and more, and then swirls them together in a psychedelic mélange of horror, sci-fi, fantasy, and pure nuttiness as it tells the story of good and evil battling over a young girl’s potty-mouthed soul. Drafthouse Films brings this gem to HD for the first time, and while the extras are unfortunately scarce the film alone is enough to warrant a purchase. Read my full review. [Blu-ray/DVD extras: Interviews, trailer, booklet]

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review cold comes the night

Chloe (Alice Eve) is single mom who works the desk of a small town motel when she’s not cleaning the rooms or taking care of her daughter. It’s a drudgery only made worse by a visit from a Child Protective Services agent who tells Chloe the motel is not a suitable living arrangement for her little girl. She’s given two weeks to fix the impossible situation, but before she can even dwell on her misery two men come looking to stay the night. One won’t survive to morning, but the other, a partially blind immigrant named Topol (Bryan Cranston), discovers that the Jeep he arrived in has been taken into police custody along with the other man’s body. He forcibly enlists Chloe’s help in retrieving a certain something hidden inside the vehicle, but Billy (Logan Marshall-Green), a local and very dirty cop, complicates things by being a greedy bastard. Cold Comes the Night is a simple little thriller that delivers the goods with a very economical style. It succeeds in part because it doesn’t extend its reach beyond the basics, but just as important are the trio of solid performances and some relatively sharp directing and writing by Tze Chun.

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Cold Comes The Night

August means the end of Breaking Bad (shhh, no tears), but it’s clearly only the beginning of great things for Bryan Cranston, who has really found his niche playing terrifying men. The trailer for the new thriller Cold Comes the Night has Cranston morphing into a menacing criminal with an impressive Russian accent, who’s hellbent on stealing back a duffel bag of cash from the cop who took it. Here’s the problem – even scary Russian thugs can be completely blind, so it’s going to take a little extra work to get that money back, like maybe using poor, struggling motel owner Alice Eve as collateral?

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